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Legacies Project Oral History: Chuck Warpehoski

Thu, 01/16/2020 - 9:32am

Chuck Warpehoski was born in 1978 and graduated from Grinnell College with a BA in sociology. He worked in Washington D.C. for the Nicaragua Network and Latin America Solidarity Coalition before moving to Ann Arbor in 2003. He directed the Ann Arbor nonprofit organization Interfaith Council for Peace and Justice (ICPJ) for sixteen years, focusing on issues such as nuclear disarmament and affordable housing. He also served on the Ann Arbor City Council from 2012 to 2018. He and his wife Nancy Shore have two children. 

Chuck Warpehoski was interviewed by students from Skyline High School in Ann Arbor in 2015 as part of the Legacies Project.

Dr. Bass dies at age 90

Dr. Bass dies at age 90 image
Parent Issue
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18
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November
Year
1997
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Kwanzaa Celebrates African Heritage

Kwanzaa Celebrates African Heritage image
Parent Issue
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26
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December
Year
1997
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Taking Root

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Parent Issue
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26
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December
Year
1995
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African-American Holiday Enters 30th Year

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19
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December
Year
1995
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Pastors On Trial

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13
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March
Year
1993
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AACHM Oral History: Dorothy Wilson

Sun, 09/28/2014 - 12:16pm

Please take a moment to take our Living Oral History Survey and let us know what you learned.

Dorothy Wilson was born November 28, 1911, in Mount Vernon, New York. She grew up in New York, where she also met her husband, living for several years in Brooklyn. She became a Licensed Practical Nurse and worked at the Brooklyn State Hospital. After her husband’s death she retired and moved, in 1972, to Ypsilanti to be near her family where she became active in volunteer work for Church Women United through Brown Chapel AME Church in Ypsilanti, the Beyer Hospital Auxiliary, and the Ypsilanti Historical Society.