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Scott Westerman and David Hessler Review New Instructional Materials at Jones School, August 1967 Photographer: Duane Scheel

Scott Westerman and David Hessler Review New Instructional Materials at Jones School, August 1967 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, August 11, 1967
Caption
U.S.-Financed School Materials: W. Scott Westerman Jr. (left), assistant superintendent for instruction for the Ann Arbor Public Schools and acting superintendent effective Sept. 1, and David Hessler, director of school libraries and instructional materials, look over materials being prepared for distribution to local schools at Jones School. The materials were purchased with funds from the federal Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Nearly $60,000 in federal funds have been used here in the last two years to buy instructional materials.

AACHM Living Oral History Project Walking Tour

Presented in Partnership between the African American Cultural and Historical Museum of Washtenaw County and the Ann Arbor District Library

Community High School, 1985 Photographer: Susan Wineberg

Community High School, 1985 image

Park at Community High School, 1974 Photographer: Susan Wineberg

Park at Community High School, 1974 image

Community High School

Community High School (CHS) is an alternative public high school serving grades 9-12 located at 401 North Division Street in Ann Arbor's historic Kerrytown District. It was one of the first magnet schools to arise from a nation-wide wave of experimental schools that drew on the social movements of the late 1960s and early 1970s, and was specifically influenced by social and political activism in Ann Arbor at the time.

Jones School

Jones School was an anchor of Ann Arbor’s historically Black neighborhood (what is now Kerrytown) from the early twentieth century until 1965. Many living Ann Arbor residents remember attending Jones School during the Civil Rights Era. In 1964 the Ann Arbor Board of Education acknowledged that, with over 75% Black students, Jones was a “de facto” segregated school. Jones School closed in 1965, and several years later the building reopened as Community High School.