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Rabbi Neal Borovitz With Shofar, September 1973

Rabbi Neal Borovitz With Shofar, September 1973 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 29, 1973
Caption
Jewish Holidays Rabbi Neal Borovitz of the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation here, sounds the shofar, heralding the arrival of the Jewish High Holidays. The shofar, or Ram's Horn, is an ancient symbol which is blown on Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Traditionally, no member of the Jewish household, man or woman, was permitted to taste food at noon on Rosh Hashanah unless he or she had heard the shofar. For people confined to their beds or who are confined to a hospital, the shofar is carried to the sick room and blown in private homes or in the hospital room. The shofar is also blown on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, concluding the Ten Days of Penitence. Yom Kippur begins Friday at sundown.

Rabbi Allan Kensky and White Cloth Covering Torah During Jewish High Holidays, Beth Israel, September 1971

Rabbi Allan Kensky and White Cloth Covering Torah During Jewish High Holidays, Beth Israel, September 1971 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 22, 1971
Caption
White Cloth Covers Torah White cloth covers the Torah as a symbol of the Jewish high holidays, Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. Rabbi Allan Kensky of Beth Israel Congregation also wears white.

Rabbi Harold S. White explains Holy Days to Ann, Michael, and Gene Sperling, September 1966

Rabbi Harold S. White explains Holy Days to Ann, Michael, and Gene Sperling, September 1966 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 9, 1966
Caption
Holy Days Rabbi Harold S. White of Beth Israel Congregation demonstrates the art of blowing the shofar (ram's horn) to three young members of his congregation: Ann Sperling, 5, and her brothers, Michael, 10, and Gene, 7, the children of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Sperling, 2563 Esch. Shown are the Ark and Torahs (scrolls of the law) with their crowns and breastplates which are used un the high holiday rituals.

Harold S. White Teachers Beth Israel Nursery School Children About Yom Kippur, September 1965

Harold S. White Teachers Beth Israel Nursery School Children About Yom Kippur, September 1965 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 24, 1965
Caption
Learn of Holy Days Beth Israel Nursery School children watch Rabbi Harold S. White blow the shofar (ram's horn) used in High Holy Day services at the synagogue. The girls are (left to right) Anna Burton, Joanne Cohn and Dorothy Farber, and the boys (left to right) David Lawson, Mark Friedman and Teddy Spears.

Rabbi Harold S. White Blows Shofar For Glenn, Elaine, and Bruce Galler, Beth Israel Center, September 1964

Rabbi Harold S. White Blows Shofar For Glenn, Elaine, and Bruce Galler, Beth Israel Center, September 1964 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 4, 1964
Caption
Fascinated Observers Rabbi Harold S. White, spiritual leader of Beth Israel Congregation, blows the shofar, the ram's horn, for Glenn, Elaine and Bruce Galler (left to right), junior members of his congregation. Their parents are Mr. and Mrs. Bernard A. Galler. The ram's horn is employed during the High Holy Days to recall the redemption of Isaac from the sacrificial altar by a ram. The Torah (center), the scroll of the five books of Moses, will be cantillated during the services.

Rabbi Harold S. White Demonstrates Blowing the Shofar for James Paper, September 1962

Rabbi Harold S. White Demonstrates Blowing the Shofar for James Paper, September 1962 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 28, 1962
Caption
Holy Days: Rabbi Harold S. White demonstrates the art of blowing the Shofar (Ram's Horn) to Master James Paper in preparation for the Jewish High Holy Days, commencing at sunset. Also in the picture are the ark in which the Scrolls of the law are kept and the crown which is placed above them.

Jewish Holiday Symbols at Beth Israel Community Center, October 1957

Jewish Holiday Symbols at Beth Israel Community Center, October 1957 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 4, 1957
Caption
For Yom Kippur: Worshippers at Yom Kippur services at Beth Israel Community Center are accustomed to these items of religious significance. Af left is a prayer book in Hebrew and English, lying atop the talis, or stoll, worn by males at all services. Resting on the book is a velvet pouch for the talis. At center is the Scroll of the Five Books of Moses, written by hand on parchment. With it is an ornamental breastplate on which the 10 Commandments are written. To the right are "the hand," a silver pointer used in reading the scroll, a white skullcap worn by males and the shofar, or ram's horn, sounded at the end of Yom Kippur. The cap's color signifies purity, sought by man during the Holy Days.

Yom Kippur Services at Lydia Mendelssohn Theater, September 1947

Yom Kippur Services at Lydia Mendelssohn Theater, September 1947 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 24, 1947
Caption
Kol Nidre Services Held For Jewish Students: Jewish students and townspeople observed the Kol Nidre rites at Lydia Mendelssohn theater last night which opened the 24 hours of prayer and fasting that marks Yom Kippur or Day of Atonement. On the rostrum before the ceremonial curtain which covers the Ark of the Law are, left to right, Eugene Mallitz, Rabbi Herschel Lymon, Milton Jacobson and Jay Singer. Mallitz, Jacobson and Singer are University students who assisted Rabbi Lymon at the traditional ceremonies.

Second Generation remembers

Second Generation remembers image
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2004
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