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Fantastic Children's Non-Fiction

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When Planet Earth Was New - by James Gladstone & Katherine Diemert -
This starkly beautiful picture book introduces very young readers to the geological history of planet Earth. Beginning with the very early development of the solar system, billions and billions of years ago, 'When Planet Earth Was New' shows the earth as it passes through various geological epochs, through the beginnings and the evolution of organic life, and into the human-dominated present. You'll find a great appendix at the end, giving a wealth of additional details. This little gem is a great way to show your child the basics of geological and biological history, years before they will first learn it in the classroom.

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Pocket Full of Colors: the magical world of Mary Blair, Disney artist extraordinaire -by Amy Guglielmo & Jacqueline Tourville-
The authors chart the course of the life of Mary Blair, the creative talent behind Disney classics like Cinderella and Alice in Wonderland. Mary's creative instincts and professional ambitions collide with gender discrimination in the highly male-dominated work-spaces of mid-century America. Mary perseveres though, and single-handedly drags the Disney Studios from it's black and white past, and into the lush colors of it's storied golden age.

While there is much to love in this slender book, as and adult, my favorite part of 'A Pocket Full of Colors' is how carefully the illustrator captured the various incarnations of Mary's personal style, from Betty Page bangs, to late 50's June Cleaver pearls, and finally into ultra-trendy 60's Mod. This beautifully illustrated, audaciously colorful picture book is a great way to introduce your little one to biographies.

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Yum! MmMm! Qué rico! : Americas' sproutings - by Pat Mora -
Featuring vibrant, warm colors and a playful style, Pat Mora manages to pack an enormous amount of quality content into a tiny little picture book. 'Written as a series of haiku, Yum! MmMm! Qué rico!' teaches kids about the history of many of the great foods that originated in the Americas (chocolate, corn, peanuts, potatoes, and many more). Be sure to check out the fun and informative histories of each food item, always in small print on the left-hand side of every page. Your child will be both educated and entertained.

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Poison : deadly deeds, perilous professions, and murderous medicines - by Sarah Albee -
Written for more advanced readers, this book is sure to satisfy kids with a passion for chemistry, history, spy-craft, or maybe just anything morbid. While the author is careful to state that 'Poison' is not an exhaustive index of poisonous materials, at nearly 200 pages, Sarah Albee manages to cover an enormous amount of ground. Your child will learn about how humans have wrangled with chemistry throughout history, focusing on the where, when, and why of how people have come into contact with dangerous chemical compounds. Be sure to check it out!

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Solar Eclipses

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A total solar eclipse will be visible in North America on Monday, August 21. Although in Ann Arbor only a partial eclipse will be visible, it will still be an exciting event! In honor of this event, we have gathered some articles and pictures from past solar eclipses as seen in Ann Arbor. Ann Arbor News' photographer, Cecil Lockard, captured the 1970 eclipse in [http://oldnews.aadl.org/aa_news_19700308_p37-solar_eclipse|time lapse.] Examples of how to view the event include an [http://oldnews.aadl.org/N011_1479_003|Ann Arbor resident's pin hole box] created for the 1963 solar eclipse, and the use of paper to project an image as seen in this picture from the [http://oldnews.aadl.org/BN218_19940511_eclipse_002|1994 eclipse.] See additional photos and articles from the News pertaining to solar eclipses [http://oldnews.aadl.org/taxonomy/term/115244|here.]

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From the Page to the Screen: Hidden Figures

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The new movie [http://www.foxmovies.com/movies/hidden-figures|Hidden Figures] is in theaters now, and is already generating positive reviews and a plethora of award nominations. This amazing true story, first published as [b:1496469| Hidden Figures: the American Dream and the Untold Story of the Black Women Mathematicians Who Helped Win the Space Race] by Margot Lee Shetterly, chronicles the trials and tribulations of a group of extraordinarily talented and dedicated African American female mathematicians, whose calculations launched John Glenn into Earth's orbit and won the space race. These "human computers" used slide rules, pencils, and adding machines to perform the advanced mathematics needed to calculate trajectories, launch windows, and navigational charts in case of electrical failures, among others. These brave women faced adversity through sexism and segregation, but persevere through it all to become key players in evolution of NASA and space exploration. This amazing story is also available on [b:1499766| audiobook] and [b:1499982|Large Print].

Author Margot Lee Shetterly will be speaking at Rackham Auditorium on January 24th from 4-8:15 PM. More information is available [http://www.engin.umich.edu/college/about/cal/events/2017/january/iamnothidden|here].

Looking to learn more about the phenomenal women scientists that propelled us into space? Check out [b:1490344| Rise of the Rocket Girls: The Women Who Propelled Us, from Missiles to the Moon to Mars] (also available [b:1496442|here] in Large Print. Or learn more about the many women who have since traveled to outer space through items such as [b:1215047| Promised the Moon], [b:1335692| Almost Astronauts: 13 Women Who Dared to Dream], and [b:1348684| Astronaut Pam: Countdown to Commander] (an especially interesting nonfiction movie that follows Commander Pam Melroy and her crew aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery). We also have books about women inventors, such as [b:1262497| Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women].

Also check out our resources regarding two very famous pioneering female astronauts: Mae Jemison and Sally Ride. Books on Sally Ride for an adult audience include [b:1480733| this photobiography] and [b:1452149|Sally Ride: America's First Woman in Space]. [b:1486458| To the Stars], [b:1460437| Sally Ride: Life on a Mission], and [b:1460762|Who Was Sally Ride?] are all intended for kids interested in learning more about Sally Ride. We also have many resources on Mae Jemison, the first African American woman to travel to space, such as [b:1468226| this biography], [b:1498844| You Should Meet Mae Jemison] or [b:1460746| Mae Jemison, Awesome Astronaut!]. You can even read books written by the astronaut herself, such as [b:1460718| The 100 Year Starship].

Just into space? We have lots for you to check out here at the library, such as [b:1468041| Eyewitness Space Exploration], or the [b:1315327| Astronaut Handbook]. [b:1261850| The Dream is Alive] is a fascinating DVD that uncovers life on a space station, and witnesses the first space walk performed by an American woman. We also have a [:node/347117|Library Space Camp] program for kids coming on Thursday, April 6th at the Downtown branch, where you can learn all about what makes a successful astronaut and complete cool space activities.

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Library Space Camp!

Thursday April 6, 2017: 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Downtown Library: Youth Story Corner
Grade K-5

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The Supermoon Lunar Eclipse Is Coming!

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Check out a library [b:1406969|telescope] or pair of [b:1458116|binoculars] for the [https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vKAw_wrIr5s|rare supermoon lunar eclipse] occurring on September 27. It won’t happen quite this way again until 2033, so this is your chance - provided Michigan weather cooperates, of course!

A “supermoon” is the point at which a full moon is closest to Earth and appears 14% bigger, and a lunar eclipse occurs when the moon falls into Earth’s shadow and looks reddish. Both events will happen concurrently on the evening of September 27, so get out after sunset and look up! Things start just after 9 pm, with the total eclipse occurring between 10:11 pm and 11:23 pm and ending around 12:30 am on September 28.

Washtenaw County Parks and Recreation is hosting a public hike and viewing of the eclipse, weather permitting, and telescopes will be set up at the Project Grow site about 100 yards south of the County Farm Park parking lot at 2210 Platt Rd.

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Library Space Camp!

Thursday February 18, 2016: 1:00pm to 3:00pm
Downtown Library: Secret Lab
Grades K-5

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Build a Bedroom Planetarium

Saturday December 5, 2015: 2:00pm to 3:30pm
Malletts Creek Branch: Program Room
Grades K–8

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Today is a good day to place a hold on a telescope

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Why? Because over the next two weeks Jupiter and Venus - both prominent in the western sky at dusk - will be moving closer and closer together until their conjunction, Tuesday, June 30, when they’ll be only .3 degrees apart and visible together in your field of view. This is [http://earthsky.org/space/dont-miss-jaw-dropping-venusjupiter-encounter|the celestial highlight of early summer], folks, so [b:1406969|place a hold today]!

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Nature Anatomy: a book for the eye and the mind

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The awesome new book [:catalog/record/1468883|Nature Anatomy], by Julia Rothman, is a delight for the eyes and the mind. In it, Rothman takes “the curious parts and pieces of the natural world” and diagrams and explains them beautifully. “If you’ve ever wanted to see how mountains are formed or wondered about the life cycle of a mushroom or the different types of feathers on a bird, you’ll delight in exploring Rothman’s diagrams, drawings and dissections,” reads the back cover of the book. I loved how “un-textbook” Rothman’s work is. Her drawings and explanations are simple, well-placed, and alternatingly cute and beautiful. There is enough detail to really learn about a given subject, but not so much that the casual reader would feel bogged down or bored. Truly, Nature Anatomy is a gem for both the least and the most science-minded.

Rothman is also the author of Farm Anatomy, a similarly designed and equally rewarding read.

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All About That Space, No Tribbles!

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Readers interested in astronauts, planets, stars, and discovery will love AADL's new youth nonfiction books on space!

[b:1465214|Professor Astro Cat's Frontiers of Space], by Dr. Dominic Walliman and Ben Newman, will have you hooked from the first page! Professor Astro Cat and friends travel through space to discover the composition of the sun, relative sizes of the planets, and a step by step process of how the Apollo II astronauts landed on the moon! Each page is highly visual with engaging graphics and interesting facts. Did you know that the International Space Station orbits the Earth 15.7 times every day? Or that objects falling into a black hole experience spaghettification? Check out this colorful book for a wild ride and even more amazing space facts!

[b:1467565|How to Be a Space Explorer: Your Out-of-this-World Adventure] by [a:Brake, Mark|Mark Brake] makes YOU the astronaut! First, get ready for space in a gravity simulator and use light-years to discover just how far apart the planets really are. Check out all the different materials used in your space suit like nylon tricot, spandex, and mylar. Real photographs of different types of spacecraft and tips for making your own bottle rocket take you on your way! Up, up, up into space until you're touring the moon and looking for signs of life. You'll feel like you're really there with this incredibly fun and interactive book.

[b:1462198|Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos] by Stephanie Roth Sisson paints a beautiful picture of the life of celebrity scientist Carl Sagan! A trip to the World's Fair as a child inspired him to dream big. He spent a lot of time at the library learning about stars and one day became the astronomer and cosmologist that so many people know about today! This book is a great biography for beginning readers with stunning illustrations.

Are you like Carl Sagan and just can't get enough science? Check out AADL's other [http://www.aadl.org/catalog/search/keyword/space?age=youth&search_format=a|books on space] and [http://www.aadl.org/sciencetools|science tools]!