Press enter after choosing selection

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Welding Class, February 1955

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Welding Class, February 1955 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 18, 1955
Caption
MEN FROM MARS?: No, they're students of welding in the Ann Arbor Public Evening School learning how to operate an electric arc welder. The piece of metal on the welding table is not visible because of the brilliant glow, the only light used by News Photographer Eck Stanger in making the picture. Behind the masks, worn to protect eyes from the blinding light, are (left to right) Jerry Marsh, Richard Straith, William Maier, Lewis Walther and Richard Gillespie. Welding is one of about 45 courses being offered adults in the spring semester. Courses include culture and leisure time business, homemaking and industry subjects.

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Auto Shop Class, February 1955

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Auto Shop Class, February 1955 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 18, 1955
Caption
KNOW YOUR AUTO: That's the title of a night school course designed to help the average car owner - women as well as men - understand the mechanics of their vehicle. It also helps them detect and make simple repairs. Donald Staebler (right), the instructor, identifies parts of an automobile engine for his class. Students (in clockwise order) are Dian Brockmiller (foreground, back to camera), Rosalyn Bondy, Tom Corkin, Helen Rocheleau and Maxine Clapper.

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Jewelry Class, February 1955

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Jewelry Class, February 1955 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 18, 1955
Caption
SHAPING JEWELRY: Dr. Harold L. Wright, jr., a University resident physician, shapes heavy silver wire into a bracelet in the jewelry class. In night school classes, persons from all walks of life - professional, housewives, business, factory, clerical, retired - develop new interests. Mrs. Pearl Sellards, jewelry instructor, notes that some students come to her class to mount gems cut and polished in lapidary classes.

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Tailoring Class, February 1955

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Tailoring Class, February 1955 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 18, 1955
Caption
CHECKS SEAM: Tailor Max Aupperle checks a skirt seam done by Mrs. Perry Brown, a student in one of his tailoring classes. Aupperle, the teacher, is a tailor and designer for Wild & Co. Teachers of other courses are drawn from various fields in the community - some public school teachers, some professionally employed in jobs related to their courses and others with special training or experience in the field.

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Metalcraft Class, February 1955

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Metalcraft Class, February 1955 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 18, 1955
Caption
INTO THE KILN: It's not clay but enamel on copper that Mrs. James D. Corfield, jr., is putting into the kiln to fire at 1,500 degrees Fahrenheit. Enameling on copper is one of the skills learned in the metalcraft class where students learn to shape, hammer and decorate metal into household articles. Small items being fired above will be enamel earrings. There also are ceramics classes where students work with clay.

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Rug Hooking Class, February 1955

Ann Arbor Public Evening School - Rug Hooking Class, February 1955 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 18, 1955
Caption
A PICTURE OF CONCENTRATION: Tending closely to their rug hooking are Mrs. Richard Leggett (foreground), Mrs. Earl Peterson (left, background) and Mrs. John Lunden. With a simple awl-like tools, shreds of material in various colors are transformed into intricate and colorfully designed rugs for the home. A hoop, similar to but much larger than an embroidery hoop, holds the working area taut.