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UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra

UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, May 10, 1892: Choral Union Series -- Boston Symphony Orchestra image
Day
10
Month
May
Year
1892
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Season: 1891-1892
Concert: FIFTH
Complete Series: XVII
University Hall, Ann Arbor, Mich.

University Hall, Ann Arbor, Mich.
Tuesday Evening, May 10, 1892.
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY.
FRANCIS W. KELSEY, Ph.D., President. ALBERT A. STANLEY, A.M., Director.
1891.--CHORAL UNION SERIES--1892. THIRD SEASON. FIFTH CONCERT. FULL SERIES, XVII.
C. A. ELLIS, Manager.
F. R. COMEE. Assistant Manager.
The next Concert in this Series will be given May 27. "THE DAMNATION OF FAUST."--BERLIOZ.
Choral Union. 266 Voices. Full Orchestra. Mrs. Genevra Johnstone-Bishop, Mr. Chas. A. Knorr, and Mr. Heinrich Meyn, Soloists.
. . THE . .
National Conservatory of Music of America,
126 & 12S East Seventeenth St., New York.
OFFICERS:
Mrs. JEANNETTE M. THURBER, President.
Hon. HENRY W. CANNON, Treasurer.
CHAS. INSLEE PARDEE, A.M., Secretary
To American Composers and Authors :
The National Conservatory of Music of America, desirous of emphasizing the engagement of Dr. Antonin Dvorak as its Director by a special endeavor to give an additional impulse to the advancement of music in the United States, proposes to award prizes for the best Grand or Comic Opera (Opera Comique), for the best Libretto for a Grand or Comic Opera (Opera Comique), for the best Piano or Violin Concerto, and for the best Symphony, Oratorio, and Suite, or Cantata, each and all of these works to be composed or written by composers and librettists born in the United States, and not above 35 years of age. The prizes shall be as follows : -SUBJECTS AND PRIZES.
For the best Grand or Comic Opera Opera Cniuiqiiit), words and music, $1,000
For the best Libretto for a Grand or Comic Opera (Opera Comlque) . 500
For the best Symphony.................... 500
For the best Oratorio.................... 500
For the best Suite or Cantata................. 300
For the best Piano or Violin Concerto ............. 200
GENERAL CONDITIONS.
1. Each work must be in manuscript form and absolutely new to the public.
2. Its merits shall be passed upon by a special jury of five or more competent judges.
3. The works to which the prizes shall be awarded shall be made known to the public under the auspices of the National Conservatory of Music of America, whose operatic conductors, vocalists, instrumentalists, choral forces, etc., insure an ensemble that must add largely to the effectiveness of the compositions.
4. The National Conservatory of Music of America reserves the right to give three public performances of the works to which prizes shall be awarded: these shall afterwards be the property of composers and authors.
5. Manuscripts shall be sent for examination, to the above address, between September 1 and October 15, 1S92. The award of prizes will be made on or about November 15, 1892.
THE JURIES:
Grand Opera. Dr. Antonin Dvorak. Mr. George W. Chadwick, Boston. Mr. Arthur Nikisch, Boston. Signor Romualdo Sapio, New York. Herr Anton Seidl, New York.
Opera Comique. Dr. Anton Dvorak. Signor Paolo Giorza, New York. Mr. Bruno Oscar Klein, New York. Herr Adolf Neuendorff, New York. Mr. Frank van der Stucken, New York.
Libretto.
Dr. Antonin Dvorak. Mr. Thomas Bailey Aldrich, Boston. Mr. Elwyn A. Barron, Chicago. Mr. C. A. Bratter, New York. Mr. Henry A. Clapp, Boston. Mr. Eugene Field, Chicago.
Mr. George P. Goodale, Detroit. Col.Thomas Weiitworth Iligginson, Boston Mr. M. G. Seckendorff, Washington. Mr. Edmund C. Stedman, New York. Mr. Benjamin Kdward Woolf, Boston. Mr. William Winter, New York.
Oratorio and Cantata. Dr. Antonin Dvorak. Mr. Dudley Buck, .Brooklyn. Mr. William W. Gilchrist, Philadelphia Mr. Benjamin J. Lang, Boston. Mr. William L. Tomlins, Chicago.
Symphony, Suite, Violin, and
Piano Concertos. Dr. Antonin Dvorak. Mr. Asger Hamerik, Baltimore. Mr. Rafael Joseffy, New York. Prof. John K. Paine, Boston. Mr. Xaver Scharwenka, New York
UNIVERSITY HALL, ANN ARBOR.
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Mr. ARTHUR NIKISCH, Conductor.
Eleventh Season, i8gi-g2.
CONCERT
Tuesday Evening, May 10, 1892,
AT EIGHT.
WITH HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE NOTES.
PUBLISHED BY C. A. ELLIS, Manager.
1854.
1892.
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Boston
Symphony
Orchestra
University Hall, Ann Arbor.
SEASON OF 1891-92.
Mr. ARTHUR NIKISCH, Conductor.
Tuesday Evening, May 10, 1892, At Eight.
PROGRAMME.
Beethoven ------Symphony in A, No. 7
Poco sostemito; Vivace.
Allegretto.
Presto ; Assai meno presto; Tempo primo.
Allegro con brio.
Chopin Concerto for Pianofoite in E minor. Op, 11
Allegro maestoso. Romance -larghetto. Rondo vivace.
¦ Mr. EUGEN. D'ALBERT. Saini-Saens Symphonic Poem, " Le Rouet d'Omphale"
Soli for Violoncello. a Chopin ----------Nocturne
i Schubert --------Moment Musical
c Klengel Capriccio
Mr. ALWIN SCHROEDER.
Wagner Prelude, " Die Meistersinger"
SOLOISTS:
Mr. EUGEN D'ALBERT.
Mr. ALWIN SCHROEDER.
THE PIANOFORTE IS A KNABE. (3)
TEACHBRS' FAVORITES.
A List of Standard Educational Works.
Foundation Studies in PIANOFORTE PLAYING.
By Stephen A. Emerj
The very best method yet published for use with beginners, and especially adapted for children.
________Price, $1.50. Net,
HEAD AND HANDS.
By Stephen A. Emery.
Fundamental Technique for the Pianoforte. An introduction to Tausig's Daily Studies.
_______Prlce$ 1.60. Net._______
SPECIAL STUDIES IN
PRESTO SCALES FOR PIANOFORTE.
By Stephen A. Emery.
Op. 20.
_________Price, $1.25. _______
PREPARATORY EXERCISES IN
PIANOFORTE PLAYING.
By Carl Faeltbn. _______Price, 75 cts. Wet._______
METHOD OF
PIANOFORTE TECHNIQUE.
By Charles Buttschardt,
With additions by Arthur Footh.
________Price, $1 -OO. Net._______
TWO PIANOFORTE PEDAL STUDIES.
By Arthur Foote. For the proper use of the Damper Pedal.
___________Price, 35 cts.___________
ETUDE ALBUM FOR THE PIANOFORTE.
A collection of Etudes for the Pianoforte, selected and arranged in progressive order.
By Arthur Foote. __________Price, $1.00. Net.__________
100 ORIGINAL DAILY EXERCISES For the Pianoforte.
By Edmund Nhupert.
Op. 57. ___________Prioe, 75 cts.___________
24 SHORT MELODIOUS STUDIES
FOR THE PIANOFORTE.
By A. D. Turner. Op. 30.
Price, Pt. I, $1.50; Pt. 2, $1.2530 EASY AND MELODIOUS STUDIES
FOR THE PIANOFORTE. j By Henry Maylath. Op. 163. fn two books. Price. SI 25 each book.
13 EASY OCTAVE STUDIES
(In the Major kevs)
FOR PIANOFORTE.
By A. D. Turner.
Op. 20. Price, go cts.
PROGRESSIVE VOCAL STUDIES
FOR MEDIUM VOICE.
By Alfred Arthur. Price, 75 cts. Net.
METHOJD
By Charles E. Tinney. Price, $1.00. Net.
THE ART OF PHRASING.
30 Vocalises by
C. Gloggner-CastelH. Edited by G. Federlein. Book I. Price $1.50. Soprano or Tenor,[Contralto, Baritone or Bass.
Book II. Price $2.50. Soprano or Tenor, Contralto.
ETUDE ALBUM
FOR THE ORGAN.
A collection of Etudes for the Organ. Selected and arranged in progressive order with Registration, Pedaling and Fingering carefully indicated. By Everett E. Tkuetth. Price, $1.50. Net.
ETUDE ALBUM FOR VIOLIN.
A collection of Etudes for the Violin. Selected and arranged in progressive order by
Charles N. Allen. Price, $1.25, Net.
DICTIONARY OF MUSICAL TERMS
AND ELEMENTS OF MUSIC.
By Edwin M. Lott and O. B. Brown. Price, 50 cts. Net.
PRIMER OF MUSICAlT FORMS
By W. S. B. Mathbws.
A Systematic View of the Typical Forms of Modern Music.
Price, 80 cts. Net.
ELEMENTS OF HARMONY.
By Stephen A. Emery.
A clear and concise method of teaching Harmony, used for many years by the leading Conservatories and teachers.
Price, $1.25. Net.
SUPPLEMENTARY EXERCISES,
Chants, and Chorals to Elements of
Harmony.
By Stephen A. Emery. Price, 50 cts. Net.
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Symphony No. 7, In A. Beethoven, 1770-1827.
Poco sostenuto (vivace).
Allegretto.
Presto (presto meno assai).
Finale (allegro con brio).
Beethoven's seventh symphony followed the sixth (" Pastoral ") after an interval of four years. Beethoven has left no record of his purpose when composing it. We know he valued it highly, for in his correspondence he refers to it,-an exceptional happening. In a letter to Salomon, he remarks, " The Grand Symphony in A, one of my very best." To Neate, he says, " Among my best works which I can boldly say of the symphony in A." Commentators, who by reason of their intimate study of Beethoven are authorities, disagree in interpreting the seventh symphony, whose composer has given them no key. Berlioz would have us believe that the first movement is a rustic wedding, and, we are therefore to suppose, drawn from the same scene of village mirth that suggested the dance in the " Pastoral" symphony. Lenz looks on the symphony and its companion,
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the eighth, as one result of the military enthusiasm which produced the "Battle of Vittoria" symphony, and, as Grove says, "bends and warps every passage to give it a warlike intention." Marx sees in the work Moorish knighthood ; OubibichefT, a masked ball; Bischoff, a sequel to the "Pastoral"; Ambros sides with Berlioz, while Wagner declares it is the apotheosis of the dance, the ideal embodiment in tones of the bodily movement.t So the doctors disagree.
The symphony remained in MS. for eighteen months, when it was first performed in the hall of the University of Vienna, Dec. 8, 1813, at a concert for the benefit of soldiers wounded at the battle of Hanau, where the Austrian and Bavarian troops endeavored to resist Napoleon's retreat from Leipzig. Grove's description is as follows : -" The programme consisted of three numbers : the symphony in A, described as 'entirely new'; two marches performed by MalzePs mechanical trumpet with full orchestral accompaniment; and a second grand instruFor a performance of the seventh symphony in Dusseldorf, in 1S60, L. Bischoff wrote a " programme," of which the following is a translation : ' To us it has always appeared as though there were some connection between the A major and ' Pastoral symphonies; and if the latter presents us, in a series of tone-pictures, with the blossoming of the spring, the murmuring of the brook, the trembling of the earth in the fructifying showers, that confident hope of the husbandman in the coming blessing, the A major symphony leads us into the joyous autumn, the rejoicings of the gleaners and yine-dressers, who celebrate the reception of the blessine contained in the sheafs, grapes, and fruit under the lindens and beeches in the holiday to which they looked
ay,
ne whispers sweet words of hope into his ear: 'Dry your tears: youth and hope beckon you. See! how beautiful is nature!1 and the alluring flutes, oboes, and shalms again summon {scherzo) all to the merry dance. . . .
" Suddenly a brilliant ray of light meets all eyes. _ The sun bursts forth once again from behind dark clouds which lie on the horizon, the hilltops glow in the evening red, the breath of God trembles through the beech-tops, heads are uncovered, eyes turned to heaven, four voices begin the evening hymn, which is repeated in chorus from the fulness of the hearts of the grateful people. Then joy beckons again, and the dance melodies float out upon the air {finale), and none stand idle. The ground trembles, joyous shouts sound through the merry din, and old and young are borne off in the mazes. For a long time some hesitate, and enter on the second quarter, until the power of the rhythm and the wild frolic draw everything into the whirlpool of joy."
t Here is the version of a humorist which appeared in 1825 in a German musical paper called C&cilia : " When the symphony was first performed, most diverse speculations were rife respecting the meaning of the work. Some said Beethoven had sought to illustrate no particular programme, others that he had endeavored to musically portray the spirit of the age, while some suggested that it was the impression resulting from a visit to a lunatic asylum. For my part, it seems to imply the following ideas : The opening bars announce a marriage to be celebrated with much pomp. The poco sostenuto represents the opening of the doors of the grand reception-rooms after the ceremony, the ascending and descending passages of the strings the finishing
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mental composition,by ' Herr Van Beethoven,' the so-called Battle of Vit-toria," op. 91. Beethoven conducted the performance in person, hardly, perhaps, to its advantage, notwithstanding the extravagant gestures described by Spohr, since he was at that time very deaf, and heard what was going on around him with great difficulty.
" The orchestra presented an unusual appearance, many of the desks being tenanted by the most famous musicians and composers of the day. Haydn was gone to his rest; but Romberg, Spohr, Mayseder, and Drag-onetti were present, and played among the rank and file of the strings. Meyerbeer (of whom Beethoven complained that he always came in after the beat) and Hummel had the drums, and Moscheles, then a youth of nineteen, the cymbals. Even Beethoven's old teacher, Kapellmeister Sa-lieri, was there, 'giving time to the drums and salvos.' The performance, says Spohr, was ' quite masterly,' the new works were both received with enthusiasm, the slow movement of the symphony was encored, and the success of the concert extraordinary. Beethoven was so much gratified as to write a letter of thanks to all the performers. The concert was repeated on the 12th of December with equal success, including the encore of the allegretto."
In form the seventh symphony closely follows the accepted model, although the scherzo contains the Beethoven innovation of a repeated trio, which he first introduced into his fourth symphony ; and, as in the eighth, an allegretto is substituted for the usual andante or larghetto.
touches of the servants to the banquet, the double basses evidently are the aged parents, who make a final tour of inspection around the rooms. With the vivace, the guests begin to arrive. All the variety of face and costume, each grotesque or beautiful, is here fully and admirably expressed by the music. The next movement, the allegretto, is a perfect picture of the nuptial ceremony. The phrases of the violoncellos represent the touching address by the priest, and the rest of the movement consists of the termination of the mass and the felicitations of the guests. In the third movement {presto) Venus and Bacchus reign supreme. By the time the allegro con brio is reached, the guests have completely lost their heads. The measure is that of a common dance tune, from which all grace is absent. Bacchus rules, disputes arise, and blows are exchanged. Suddenly the dance is interrupted by a terrific ' Hurrah!' After this comes a short lull; but the festive dance is soon resumed, and increases in wildness till tables are upset, candelabra broken, and the utmost disorder prevails,-accident clearly set forth by a motive given out by the double basses. In short, Ih&fpte terminates in a wild orgy, from which only a few strong heads escaped."
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Concerto for Pianoforte, in E minor, Op. 11. Chopin," 1809-1849.
Chopin wrote only two works (his concertos for pianoforte) with orchestral accompaniment, and these represent his only orchestral compositions. Ehlert, in one of his discriminating essays, says: " Chopin felt himself compelled to satisfy all demands exacted of a pianist, and write the unavoidable pianoforte concerto. He composed two of them at an early period, before his Paris time, and acquitted himself of his task as best he could. It was not consistent with his nature to express himself in broad terms. His lungs were too weak for the pace in seven-league boots, so often required in a score : ... he must touch the keys by himself, without being called upon to heed the player sitting next him."
While Liszt denies the concertos equal individuality with the ballades, mazourkas, waltzes, and polonaises, he says, " Nevertheless, these efforts are distinguished by a rare nobility of style, and certain passages of high interest, and movements of surprising grandeur of thought."
In the London Athenaum of May 6, 1848, Mr. Chorley writes in this manner of Chopin and his compositions: "It is true that M. Chopin's notation is by fits, needlessly teasing; that his harmonies from time to time are such as require his own sliding, smooth, delicate fingers to carry off. It is true that old-fashioned, steady pianoforte players, who have no touch of waywardness, or gypsy wildness, or insanity, in their treatment of the instrument, will point to single bars with M. Burchell's monosyllable,-utterly unable, moreover, to make anything of the whole. But there is a world of real as well as of affected romance in art; and, although no wise man could confine himself exclusively to this, no liberal one will refuse to enter it in turn. And seeing that nothing stands still or is exactly reproduced, and believing that romantic music appears so simultaneously just now in all
the countries of Europe as to indicate a desire that will have satisfaction, such individual reveries, such delicately tinted sketches, such melodies near akin to the aeolian harp's caprices as M. Chopin gives us, must be allowed to possess the general value of artistic significance and consistency, as well as an exquisite charm for particular listeners, when in a particular mood. He is distinctly, gracefully, poetically natural, and therefore well worth studying in his writings."
A somewhat warmer writer among ourselves, Mr. Van Cleve, says of the Concerto in E minor: " This is justly regarded by all pianists as one of the very noblest and most poetic compositions in the entire literature of their instrument. The brilliant runs, the ravishing melodies, the dazzling passages of bravura, the aerial nuances which abound in this immortal concerto combine to render it a masterpiece in the highest sense. It was, strange to say, one of the early works of Chopin; and when he, at the age of twenty, played it in Vienna, the style was so utterly original that the big-wigs were not a little perplexed by all these new effects. The orchestral part is by no means equal in beauty to the solo part; yet it has some exquisite effects, such as that of the French horns taking a third, which they sustain, while the bassoons flow in with the same, and later the flutes, with the clarinets. Then the mellow French horns have a divine counter-melody against the cantabile theme of the first allegro, and the effect of the muted string accompaniment in the romanza is inexpressibly lovely."
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ENTR'ACTE.
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Face : Portrait of Richard Wagner.
Reverse: (from an original sketch by Prof. Adolph Schmitz, of Dusseldorf) : representation of the principal characters in Wagner's works. On the right, the Hollander, Lohengrin, Tannhauser, Hans Sachs and Tristan ; on the left, Brunhilda. Wotan, Siegfried and the Rhinedaughters.
A Pen Picture of Richard Wagner.
The most striking thing about Richard Wagner at first sight was the extraordinary life and energy which animated this insignificant body, surmounted by a very large head, with an enormous frontal development. His caricaturists, especially those in England, have made the most of this disproportion, which made the man look smaller than he really was. His bright eyes and pleasant glance softened the strongly marked face, and hisrnouth, notwithstanding the undue prominence of nose and chin, had a
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singular expression of sweetness and affability. With his short stature, his extreme rapidity of movement, gait, and gesture, he gave from the first an expression of unusual and powerful originality: he fascinated by his conversation, so animated was he on all subjects which interested him, and he always acted out his discourse. He was violent, even explosive, in temper. With him, gayety, like wrath, was tempestuous and overflowing. Was he seized with a fit of mirth or raillery, he lost all control: he no longer knew what he was saying or to whom he was talking; and his wife, whose diplomacy was ever on the watch to prevent or repair his blunders, was often unable to hold him back or to keep up with him on this slippery ground. He was unmistakably incorrigible.
Wherever he was, he eclipsed all about him; and his melodious voice added still more to the musical effect of his discourse. In short, his native irresistible energy, his irrepressibility, his gift of incessant production, went hand in hand with a simple kindness of heart, an extreme sensibility. And Mr. Dannreuther, who knew him intimately, adds, not without a shadow of regret: " The noble and good man whom his friends loved and the aggressive critic or reformer who addressed himself to the public were two very distinct individuals in Richard Wagner. Toward the public and the world of singers, actors, and musicians, he had habitually an attitude of defiance: with them he was always on the point of exasperation. Impatient, nervous, irritable, he seemed to take pleasure in picking men to pieces." Alas! yes, that was the disagreeable side of his nature.
And yet what a fascinating influence he exerted over so many artists devoted to his cause ! How he subjugated them, how he fanaticized them by a superior charm, perhaps by his very violence, and without troubling himself about the jealousies which he might provoke among them ! Atthe reception which followed the " Parsifal" representations, he lavished the
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most flattering praise and counsel upon his favorite singer, Mme. Materna, while, by humiliating contrast, Mile. Brandt, who had devoted herself body and soul to his cause and who had made an incomparable Kundry, was left in the shade, alone with Mme. Wagner, who forced her, by many kind attentions, to forget her rival's supreme triumph with the master. And the heroic artist, in her fanaticism, would have gladly served him the next year if Wagner, before his death, had not struck her name from the list of interpreters worthy to participate in the festivals of 1883.
He made but a sign, and nearly two hundred of the best artists of Germany and foreign lands hastened to the rehearsals and performances of the Trilogy, which lasted through two summers. Proud to be associated with his work, they cheerfully signed the agreement to spend at Bayreuth three whole months of these two years, without making anything more than their board and their travelling expenses. Finally, did he not impose upon the most celebrated singers the strict obligation not to respond to any recall, no matter how much they were applauded, in order to " keep better within the compass of the work which they were to present to the public " And all submitted without complaint to this iron rule, patiently waiting until it should please Wagner to unmask them, then appearing all together, grouped in costume about the master, not for themselves nor for the public, but in order to give to the author " a last comprehensive view of his work." Is it not remarkable, and can another case be cited where a man has exercised so great a control over subjects so difficult to govern
All who approached Richard Wagner were charmed, carried away, dominated by his personality, those who knew him intimately as well as those who had only a passing acquaintance; but all testify likewise as to the uncertainty of his temper and the necessity of bending before him. For example, what says Mme. Judith Gautier, who had a sort of religious admiration for him " It must be admitted that there is in Richard Wagner's character an element of violence and roughness which is the cause of his
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being often misunderstood, but only by those who judge by exteriors alone. Nervous and impressionable to excess, his sentiments and emotions are always pushed to their paroxysm: a slight pain is with him almost a despair, the least irritation has the appearance of a frenzy. This marvellous organization of so exquisite a sensibility experiences some terrible vibrations : one even questions how he is able to stand them. One day of sorrow makes him ten years older; but let joy return, and he is younger chan ever the next day. He spends his energies with an extraordinary prodigality. Always sincere, giving himself up entirely to all things, but of a very changeable disposition ; his opinions, his ideas, absolute at the first moment, have nothing irrevocable about them; nobody is quicker than he is to recognize an error, but the first fire must be allowed to burn itself out. By the frankness and the vehemence of his speech, it often happens that he unintentionally wounds his best friends : excessive always, he goes too far without realizing the sorrow that he may cause. Many people, wounded in their self-love, have silently carried away their hurt, which rankled in their breasts, and they lost thus a precious friendship: whereas, if they had said that they were wounded, they would have seen such sincere regret on the master's part, such warm and earnest efforts to console them, that their love for him would have been increased."--From advance sheets of translation and reproduction of the Subscription Edition de Luxe of "Richard Wagner : His Life and Works" by Adolphe Jullicn, to be published by'jhej. B. Millet Company, Boston.
ZEZDITIOZCsT DE
LIMITED TO I,OOO COI'IKS.
RICHARD WAGNER,
HIS LIFE AND WORKS. Translated from the French of
ADOLPHE JULLIEN.
Richly illustrated with fourteen phototypes from original drawings by M. Fantin-Latour. Also with fifteen portraits of Richard Wagner, and one hundred and thirteen text cuts, caricatures, etc.
The notable success of the limited French edition of Adolphe Jullien's " Richard Wagner, Sa Vie et ses Oeuvres," of which this work is a translation and reproduction, has established its paramount value both as an authentic biography and a critical review. '
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Symphonic Poem, "Le Kcmet d'Ompliale" (The Spinning-wheel of Omphale), Op. 1.
Saint-Saens, 1835.
Mythological, legendary, and historical subjects have ever attracted the pen of the most brilliant and cosmopolitan of living French composers, Camille Saint-Saens. Two of the four symphonic poems illustrate phases in the life of Hercules, a third has to do with a roistering son of Jupiter, while the fourth (" Danse Macabre "), though pure fantasy, is not without some historical justification. " The Spinning-wheel of Omphale " was composed first of the group of four pieces which introduced a new orchestral manner into France, and proclaimed a Frenchman with a masterly and picturesque method. Saint-Saens did not, however, originate the title of Symphonic Poem : that was an affair of Liszt's, who thought twelve years about a manuscript poem he heard Victor Hugo read in Paris (1830-35), and finally gave it a musical setting, under the caption " Poeme Syraphonique."
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The date of the composition of Saint-Saens's symphonic poems (the opus number of the fourth is 50) is about 1875. Saint-Saens came upon Boston that year like a whirlwind. Theodore Thomas's orchestra played " The Spinning-wheel of Omphale " on November 20; and the interest then created has resulted in a quite thorough acquaintance with what the fascinating Frenchman has written in all forms, save that of opera. But to return to Hercules and the Lydian queen : Saint-Saens depicts that part of the story in which Hercules is in love with Omphale.
In a notice prefixed to the score the composer informs his hearers that the subject of his music is the alluring power of woman and the triumphant victory of weakness over strength. The " Spinning-wheel" is a mere artistic pretext to give the rhythm and form which are necessary for the music. " Those," says Saint-Saens, " who wish to go more into detail will find in one passage a picture of Hercules groaning under the bonds which he is unable to break, and in another Omphale laughing over his ineffectual ¦efforts to get free."
When examining the score on the basis of these remarks, Mr. A. Maczewski says, we easily discern its three main subjects of illustration, viz.: -1. "The power of feminine allurement. Triumphant struggle of weakness against strength; in fact, Omphale's fascination of Hercules."
2. " Hercules in bondage "; or, as the author has it, " Hercules groaning under the bonds which he cannot break."
3. " Omphale deriding the vain efforts of the hero."
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