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UMS Concert Program, : Text Of Old Melodies -- Plunket Greene

UMS Concert Program, : Text Of Old Melodies -- Plunket Greene image UMS Concert Program, : Text Of Old Melodies -- Plunket Greene image
Day
9
Month
April
Year
1897
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Rights Held By
University Musical Society
OCR Text

Text of Old Melodies
SUNG BY
PLCINKET GREENE
"OH! YARMOUTH IS A PRETTY TOWN."
Oh ! Yarmouth is a pretty town, and shines where it stands, And the more I think of it, the more it runs in my mind; The more I think of it, it makes my heart to grieve-At the sign of the "Angel " pretty Nancy did live.
The rout came on Sunday, on Monday we marched away; The drums they did beat, and the music did play; Many hearts were rejoicing, but my heart was sad, To part from my true love--what a full heart I had.
Will you go on board of ship my love, will you try
I'll buy you as fine seafare as money will buy;
And whilst I'm on on sentry, I'll guard you from all foe.
My love, will you go with me But her answer was " No ! "
Oh! Yarmouth is a pretty town, and shines where it stands, And the more I think of it, the more it runs in my mind; The more I think of it, it makes my heart to grieve-At the sign of the "Angel" pretty Nan I did leave.
"I WILL GIVE YOU THE KEYS OF HEAVEN."
He. I will give you the Keys of heaven, I will give you the keys of heaven, Madam, will you walk Madam, will you talk Madam will you walk and talk with me
She. Though you give me the keys of heaven, Though you give me the keys of heaven, Yet I will not walk, yet I will not talk, Yet I will not walk or talk with thee.
He. I will give you a coach and six,
And six black horses blacker than pitch; Madam will you walk and talk with me
She. Though you give me a coach and six,
And six black horses blacker than pitch, Yet I will not walk or talk with thee.
He. I will give you the keys of my heart,
And we'll be married till death us do part; Madam will you walk and talk with me
She. Thou shalt give me the keys of thy heart, And we'll be married till death us do part, I will walk, I will talk, I will walk and talk with thee. Cheshire.
"THE TWA SISTERS O' BINNORIE."
There were twa sisters sat in a bow'r,
Edinbro Edinbro'', There were twa sisters sat in a bow'r,
Stirling for aye,
There were twa sisters sat in a bow'r, There came a knight to be their wooer,
Bonny St. Johnston stands on Toy.
He courted the eldest wi' glove and ring,
Edinbro', Edinbro', But he lo'ed the youngest aboon a' thing,
Stirling for aye, The eldest she was vexed sair, And sair envied her sister dear,
Bonny St. Johnston stands on Tay.
She's ta'en her sister by the hand,
Edinbro', Edinbro', And down they went to the river strand,
Stirling for aye, The youngest stood upon a stane The eldest came and pushed her in,
Bonny St. Johnston stands on Toy.
Sometimes she sank, sometimes she swam,
Edinbro', Edinbro', Till she came to the mouth o' yon mil1 dam,
Stirling for aye,
And out then came the miller's c.i, And there he found a drowned woman,
Bonny St. Johnston staids on Tay.
Round about her middle sma',
Edinbro', Edinbri. , There went a gowden girdle braw,
Stirling or aye. All amang her yellow hair A string of pearls was twisted rare,
Bonny St Johnston stands on Tay.
And by there cam' a harper fine,
Edinbro', Edinbro', Harped to nobles when they dine,
Stirling for aye,
He's ta'en three locks of her yellow hair, And with them strung his harp sae fair,
Bonny St. Johnston stands on Tay.
He went unto her father's hall,
Edinbro', Edinbro', And played his harp before them all,
Stirling for aye,
And soon the harp sang soft and clear "Farewell my father and mother dear ! "
Bonny St. Johnston stands on Tay.
And next when the harp began to sing,
Edinbro', Edinbro', 'Twas "Farewell Sweetheart" said the string,
Stirling for aye,
And then as plain as plain could be "There stands my sister, wha drowned me !"
Bonny St. Johnston stands on Tay.
f. " Scots Wha Hae." (Old Air, " Hey Tuttie Taitie.")
Scots wha hae wi' Wallace bled, Scots wham Bruce hath often led, Welcome to your gory bed, Or to victorie!
Noo's the day, and noo's the hour; See the front o' battle lour; See approach proud Edward's power, Chains and slaverie.
Wha wad be a traitorknave Wha wad fill a coward's grave Wha sae base as be a slave Let him turn and flee!
Wha for Scotland's king and law, Freedom's sword will strongly draw, Freeman stand or freeman fa'-Let him follow me!
By oppression's woes and pains, By your sons in servile chains, We will drain our dearest veins, But they shall be free!
Lay the proud usurpers low! Tyrants fall in every foe! Liberty's in every blow! Let us do or dee!
Robert Burns.
g. "Where be going" (" Pa le er ew why moaz")
" Where be ging to, dear little maiden,
With your red, nsv cheeks, and your black, curly hair"
" I be going amilkir.n;, kind little man," she said;
" 'Tisdabbling in the dw makes the milkmaids fair."
"Shall I go with you, dear iittle maiden, With your red, rosy cheeks an .' your black, curly hair" "With all my heart, my kind little man," she said; " 'Tis dabbling in the dew makes the milkmaids fair."
"Say, shall I wed you, dear little maiden, With your red, rosy cheeks and black, curly hair" "With that I agree, my kind little man," she said; "'Tis dabbling in the dew makes the milkmaids fair."
(Words taken from various editions.)
h. "When She Answered Me." When she answered me her voice was low, But minstrel never matched his chords To such a wealth of warbled words In Temora's palace long ago.
And no other orbs shall e'er eclipse That magic look of maiden love, And never song my soul shall move
Like that low, sweet answer of her lips.
"THE KERRY COW."
" O what are you seeking my pretty colleen So sadly, tell me now" " O'er mountain and plain
I'm searching in vain, Kind sir for my Kerry Cow."
"Is she black as the night with a star of white Above her bonny brow
And as clever to clear
The dykes as a deer" "That's just my own Kerry Cow."
" Then cast you eye into that field of wheat She's there as large as life," " My bitter disgrace !
Howe'er shall I face The farmer and his wife '"
"Since the farmer's unwed, you've no cause for dread From his wife you must allow, And for kisses three-'Tis myself is he-x
The farmer will free your cow."
Alfred Perceval Craves.
"heigho! the morning dew." . TS
Och! laughin' roses are your lips,
Forgetme not your ee; It's many a lad they're drivin' mad;
They shall not so wi' me.
' Heigho ! the morning dew ! Heigho ! the rose and rue ! Follow me, my bonny lass, For I'll not follow you.
Wi' heart in mout', in hope and doubt,
Your lovers come and go; Your smiles receive, your smiles deceive; ,
You shall not serve me so ! ;., rrr
Heigho! etc. .?&.
If I but keep me to mysel', sJT'.
Upon my knowledge tree, "T
Like Mother Eve, the rest you'l leave ? vsMl
To treat yoursel' to me.
Heigho! etc.
Alfred Perceval Graves,.
i. "Father O'Flynn." r,
Of priests we can afford a charmin' variety, ' "fsA Far renowned for larnin' and piety; ' "'T
Still, I'd advance you, widout impropriety, Father O'Flynn as the flow'r of them all.
Here's a health to ye, Father O'Flynn; Slainte and slainte and slainte agin; Pow'rfulest preacher and tinderest teacher And kindliest creature in ould Donegal!
Don't talk of your Provost and fellows of Trinity, Famous forever at Greek and Latinity; Dad, and the divils and all, at Divinity-. r
Father O'Flynn makes hares of them all!
Come, I venture to give you my word, sNever the like of this logic was heard! Down from mythology into thayology-?"
Troth! and conchology, if he'd the call!
Here's a health, etc.
Och, Father O'Flynn, you've a wonderful way with you; All ould sinners are wishful to pray wid you, And the young childer are wild to play wid you, You've such a way wid you, Father avick.
Still, for all you've so gentle a soul, Gad! you've your flock in the grandest control! Checking the crazy ones, coaxin' onaisy ones, Lifting ihe lazy ones on wid the shtick.
Here's a health, etc.
And tho' quite avoidin' all foolish frivolity, Still, at all saysons of innocent jollity, Where was the playboy could claim an equality At comicality, Father, wid you
Once the Bishop looked grave at your jest, Till this remark set him off wid the rest; " Is it lave gayety all to the laiety Cannot the clergy be Irishmen too"
Here's a health, etc.

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