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UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20 1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series

UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image UMS Concert Program, May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916: Twenty-third Annual May Festival Of The University Of Michigan -- Choral Union Series image
Day
1
Month
May
Year
1916
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University Musical Society
OCR Text

Season: 1915-1916
Concert: SIXTH
Complete Series: CCXCI
Hill Auditorium Ann Arbor, Michigan

TUBE

SD
[official]
TWENTY-THIRD
Annual May Festival
OF THF,
UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
TO BE HELD IN
HILL AUDITORIUM ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
May 17, 18, 19, 20
1916
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL
SOCIETY
I9I6
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Board of Directors
FRANCIS W. KELSEY, Ph.D., LL.D.......President
HARRY B. HUTCHINS, LL.D.......Vice-President
LEVI D. WINES, C.E........ . . Treasurer
ALBERT A. STANLEY, A.M. ...... Musical Director
G. FRANK ALLMENDINGER, C.E. JAMES B. ANGELL, LLD. OTTMAR EBERBACH. HORACE G. PRETTYMAN, A.B. SHIRLEY W. SMITH, A.M. WILLIAM C. STEVENS, A.B. VICTOR C. VAUGHAN, Ph.D., Sc.D., M.D. JAMES H. WADE.
DURAND W. SPRINGER, B.S., Secretary of the Board of Directors.
CHARLES A. SINK, A.B., Business Manager.
Deceased.
II.
Illustrations
James Burrill Angell...... Frontispiece
Frederick A. Stock ...... Facing page iv
Albert A. Stanley....... " " viii
Frieda Hempel....... " " xii
M. Enrico Bossi . ..... " " 20
Florence HinklE....... " " 28
gustae holmquest....... " " 32
Sophie Braslau....... " " ' 36
Reinald Werrenrath...... " " 44
Group...... . . . " " 48
Horace L Davis, Robert R. Dieterle, R. D. T. Hollister, A. Grace Johnson, Maude C. Rleyn, Doris Jean Marvin, Chase B. Sikes.
John McCormack....... " " 52
Ralph Kinder....... " " 60
C. Saint-Saens....... " " 68
Margarete Matzenauer...... " " 76
Pasquale Amato....... " " 84
Morgan Kingston....... " " 92
III.
List of Concerts and Soloists
WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 17, 8:00 O'CLOCK
OPENING CONCERT
SOLOIST
Frieda Hempel, Soprano
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock, Conductor
THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 18, 8:00 O'CLOCK
"PARADISE LOST"
Bossi
SOLOISTS
Florence Hinkle, Soprano Reinald WerrEnrath, Baritone
Sophie Brasi.au, Contralto Gustaf Holmquist, Bass
The University Choral Union
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Albert A. Stanley, Conductor
FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 19, 2:30 O'CLOCK
CHILDREN'S CONCERT
SOLOISTS
Miss Florence Hinkle, Soprano . . . Mr. Horace L. Davis, Tenor
Miss Ada Grace Johnson, Soprano Mr. Chase B. Sikes, Baritone
Miss Maud KlEyn, Soprano Mr. Robert Dieterle, Baritone
Miss Doris Marvin, Soprano Mr. R. D. T. HollistER, Narrator
Special Children's Chorus
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock and Albert A. Stanley, Conductors
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 19, 8:00 O'CLOCK
MISCELLANEOUS CONCERT
SOLOIST
John McCormack, Tenor
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock, Conductor
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 20, 2:30 O'CLOCK
ORGAN RECITAL
Ralph Kinder, Organist
SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 20, 8:00 O'CLOCK
"SAMSON AND DELILAH"
Saint-Saens CAST
Delilah . . . Mme. Margarets MatzEnauer
Samson.....Mr. Morgan Kingston
High Priest .... Sig. Pasquale Amato
MR. REJNALD WERRENRATH
The University Choral Union
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Albert A. Stanley, Conductor
IV.
SD
CHORAL UNION SERIES, 1915-1916
THIRTY-SEVENTH SEASON SIXTH CONCERT
No! CCXCI COMPLETE SERIES
First May Festival Concert
WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 17, 8:00 O'CLOCK SOLOIST
Miss Frieda Hempel, Soprano
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Mr. Frederick A. Stock, Conductor
OVERTURE--"Le Carnival Romaine" ARIA--from ''II re pastore"
Miss Frieda Hempei,
SYMPHONY NO. 7--A minor, Op. 92
Poco sostenuto--Vivace; Allegretto Presto; Allegro con brio
Berlioz Mozart
Beethoven
Intermission
ARIA--"Caro Nome" (Rigoletto)
Miss Hempei,
Verdi
WEDDING MARCH AND VARIATIONS--from "The Rustic
Wedding" Goldmark
ARIA--Mad Scene from "Lucia di Lammermoor" Donizetti
Miss Hempei,
SWEDISH RHAPSODY
Alfven
V.
CHORAL UNION S-ERIES, 1915-1916
THIRTY-SEVENTH SEASON SEVENTH CONCERT
No. CCXCII COMPLETE SERIES
Second May Festival Concert
THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 18, 8:00 O'CLOCK
"PARADISE LOST"
Symphonic Poem in a Prologue and Three Parts for Soli, Chorus., and Orchestra, Op. 125, Bossi
CAST ! Mr. Reinald WerrEnrath, Baritone
Miss Florence HinklE, Soprano Mr. Gustaf Holmquist, Bass
! Miss Sophie Braslau, Contralto
SATAN ADAM EVE MOLOCH
BELIAL URIEL
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
The University Choral Union
Mr. Albert A. Stanley, Conductor
Mr. Earl V. Moore, Organist
SYNOPSIS
PROLOGUE
"Void and black laythe earth."--Chorus. The Prophecy.
"Out of the void beneath."--Chorus. "Let there be flowers!"--Chorus. "All hail! Great God!"--Chorus.
PART I.--Hell
Introduction.--Orchestra. "Glory to God."--Chorus. "Arise my compeers in damnation!"
--Satan.
"I follow gladly!"--Moloch. "Fight then!"--Belial. "Can there be concord or rest below
Satan lead to the fray!"--Chorus. Valiant companions, O tarry!--Satan. "Glory, Satan, to thee!"--Chorus.
PART II.--Paradise Introduction.--Orchestra. "Hail! new creation !"--Chorus. The First Prayer.--Adam and Eve. "My Lord, my God."
"All-seeing Godhead !"--Uriel. "Hearken to my warning!"--Chorus. "Father of Truth eternal."--Tenors. "Promise of joy so gladly ringing."
--Double Chorus.
PART III.--Earth
Introduction.--Orchestra.
"O ye dew-laden petals."--Chorus.
"See now the cuckoo wakes"--Chorus.
"We merrily dance."--Tenors.
"Night's misty shadows thy face con­cealing."--Adam.
"Beloved, I cannot sleep for joy."--Eve.
(Continuation of Duet between Adam and Eve.)
"Thou sinnest!"--Chorus. "Tho' long and dreary."--Tenors. "Now arise, all ye kingdoms."--Chorus. "Farewell, lost happiness."
--Adam and Eve. "O wondrous blessing."--Chorus.
VI.
CHORAL UNION SERIES, 1915-1916
THIRTY-SEVENTH SEASON EIGHTH CONCERT
No. CCXCIII COMPLETE SERIES
Third May Festival Concert
FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 19, 2:30 O'CLOCK
CHILDREN'S CONCERT
Mr. Frederick Stock, Mr. Albert A. Stanley, Conductors
PROGRAM
CHRISTMAS HYMN--"Silent Night!" Gruber
Children's Chorus
"THE CHILDREN AT BETHLEHEM"
PlERNE
A Mystery in Two Parts for
Soli, Children's Chorus and Orchestra
CAST
THE STAR
TEANNETTE
NICHOLAS
LUBIN
NARRATOR
THE ASS
THE OX
A HERDSMAN
A CELESTIAL VOICE
Miss Florence Hinkle, Soprano
Miss Ada Grace Johnson, Soprano
Miss Maud Kleyn, Soprano
Miss Doris Marvin, Soprano
Mr. Richard D. T. Holuster,
Mr. Horabe L. Davis, Tenor
Mr. Chase B. Sikes, Baritone
Mr. Robert Dieterle, Baritone
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Children's Chorus--Ann Arbor Public Schools
Mr. Albert A. Stanley, Conductor
PART I.--The Plain Int reduction.--Orchestra. "The voice of the frosty night shivers."
Narrator.
"Heads of brown and heads of yellow."
--Children.
"Jack and Joan they cried for the moon."
--Children. "Shadows lengthen, growing deep."
--Jeannette. "Hear ye the Voice"--Jeannette,
Nicholas, and Lubin. "Et o louvaiet derelo."--A Herdsman. "In my father's field chanticleers are three."--Children.
Cortege of the Three Kings-Ensemble
"Where away, fond and fearless Behold, now the Saviour cometh."
--The Star. "Noel! Noel! Noel!"--Ensemble.
PART II.--The Stable
"Lull to sleep."--The Virgin.
"Sad lips and eyes."--The Virgin, The Ass, and The Ox.
"Where away, fond and fearless."--The Children.
"Not a doubt but they make hurly-burly."--The Ass.
"See; Three lords approach."--The Ox.
"Babe so sweet."--The Three Youths.
"Noel! The star over our heads is standing."--Jeannette.
"Unbar the door!"--The Children.
"I warn you all."--The Ox.
"Baby Jesus lies a-sleeping."--The Ass.
"Pray for us al!"--Ensemble.
"My God, why hast thou forsaken me" --A Celestial Voice.
"Little Christ Child, adieu
We'll pray for Him
Noel!"--The Children.
SYMPHONY in E flat (Kochel 543) Mozart
Adagio--Allegro; Andante con moto; Menuetto; Allegro.
VII.
CHORAL UNION SERIES, 1915-1916
THIRTY-SEVENTH SEASON NINTH CONCERT
No. CCXCIV COMPLETE SERIES
Fourth May Festival Concert
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 19, 8:00 O'CLOCK
MISCELLANEOUS CONCERT
SOLOIST
Mr. John McCormack, Tenor Management C. L. Wagner 1451 Broadway, New York
Mr. Edwin Schneider, Accompanist The Chicago Symphony Orchestra Mr. Frederick A. Stock, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE--to "Fidelio" . Beethoven
RECITATIVE--"Deeper and Deeper Still" j Haendel
ARIA--"Waft Her Angels Through the Skies" (Jephthah) I
Mr. John McCormack
SUITE--Op. 19 Dohnanyi
Andante con Variaziona; Scherzo; Romanza; Rondo Songs:
(a) Farewell Schubert
(b) "The Soldier" Schumann
(c) When Night Descends RakhmaninoFF
(d) If I Were King Liszt
Mr. McCormack
OVERTURE--Fantasia, "Francesca da Rimini" Tschaikowsky
ARIA--"Salve Dimora (Faust) Gounod
Mr. McCormack
LOVE SCENE--from "Feursnot" Strauss
The Piano Used is a Steinway VIII.
SD
CHORAL UNION SERIES, 1915-1916
THIRTY-SEVENTH SEASON TENTH CONCERT
No. CCVC COMPLETE SERIES
Fifth May Festival Concert
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 20, 2:30 O'CLOCK Ralph Kinder, Organist
PROGRAM
CONCERT OVERTURE in C minor
BERCEUSE
FUGUE A LA GIGUE
RELIGIOUS MELODY AND VARIATIONS
(From the Sonata in A minor)
BURLESCA E MELODIA
AT EVENING )
JOUR DE PRINTEMPS (Spring Day) [¦ IN MOONLIGHT 3
FINALE in D major (from Symphony, No. i)
H. A. FrickER
A. GUILMANT
J. S. Bach G. E. Whiting
R. L. Baldwin R. Kinder L. ViERNE
IX.
CHORAL UNION SERIES, 1915-1916
THIRTY-SEVENTH SEASON ¦ ELEVENTH CONCERT
No. CCVCI COMPLETE SERTES
Sixth May Festival Concert
SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 20, 8:00 O'CLOCK
"SAMSON AND DELILAH"
Saint-Sabns
Opera in Three Acts
CAST SAMSON Morgan Kingston
DELILAH Mme. Margarets Matzenauer
HIGH PRIEST Sig. Pasquale Amato
. Reinald Werrenrath
Mr. Albert A. Stanley, Conductor
SYNOPSIS
ACT I
(A public square in Gaza, Palestine; Temple of Dagon in background.)
Scene I. Hebrew Men and Women-Samson in their midst.
Scene II. Abimelech, Philistine Sol­diers, Samson and Israelites.
Scene III. The same as above, with the High Priest, Guards, First and Sec­ond Philistines.
Scene IV. Hebrew Old Men; Samson and Victorious Hebrews. (The Gates of Dagon's Temple swing open.)
Scene V. Samson, Delilah, the Old Hebrew, Philistines, and Hebrews. Dance of the Priestesses of Dagon.
ACT II (The Valley of Soreck, in Palestine.)
Scene I. Delilah alone.
Scene II. Delilah and the High Priest.
Scene III. Samson and Delilah.
ACT III
Scene I. (A Prison at Gaza.) Samson and Captive Hebrews.
Scene II. Interior of Dagon's Temple. Delilah, Young Philistine Women and Dancers. Ballet.
Scene III. High Priest, Delilah, Sam­son, Philistine Men and Women.
X.
Descriptive Programs
ANALYSES BY
ALBERT A. STANLEY
COPYRIGHT
by the University Musical Society
Ann Arbor Mich.
1916
Our patrons are invited to inspect the Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments in the Foyer of the First Balcony and the adjoining room.
To study the evolution, it is only necessary to view the cases in their numerical order and remember that in the wall cases the evolution runs from right to left and from the top to the bottom, while the standard cases should always be approached on the left hand side. Descriptive lists are attached to the cases.
The conductor of the choral concerts desires to express his great obligation to Miss Florence B. Potter, Supervisor of Music in the Ann Arbor Public Schools, for her valuable services in the prepara­tion of the Children's Choruses.
Arx Concerts Wiix Begin on Time
XI.
1
FIRST CONCERT
Wednesday Evening, May 17
OVERTURE--"Le Carneval Romaine".......Berlioz
Hector Berlioz was born at Cote St. Andre, France, December n, 1803; died at Paris, March 9, 1869.
Some one, whose inventiveness exceeded his judgment, called Berlioz the "French Beethoven." As such pronouncements are generally based on nothing substantial it is amazing that they maintain themselves long after their absurdity has been proven. The fact is there will never be another Palestrina, Mozart, Haydn, or Wagner, until all leaves are alike and the Bertillion system of identification fails. In a sense, most great geniuses are expressions of nationality as well as of their art. This is a potent reason for the failure of such comparisons as quoted above. Berlioz was a man of rare intellectual gifts, of commanding musical talent, of indefatigable industry, but he lacked the vital spark of genius. He had a wonderful control of the materials of composition, and was conscientiously devoted to his ideals, but as a composer he was not worthy to "unloose the lachets" of Beethoven's shoes.
When we consider the real Berlioz, stripped of the borrowed plumage placed on him by unwise worshippers, he commands our adfriiration, for in many respects the world of music is under great obligations to him.
Possibly, no selection could more worthily display his gifts than the overture which introduces the present Festival series of concerts. Originally it figures as the Introduction to Act II of his opera "Benvenuto Cellini." The opera as a whole was enthusiastically rejected by the Parisian public on its first performance, September 3, 1838, a verdict sustained shortly after by the London critics. The overture on our program, however, was received with unbounded enthusiasm in both cities. It por­trays such incidents in a Roman Carnival as give color and life to this veritable Sat­urnalia of the common people. One needs but to think of the extravagancies of such an occasion to realize the truthfulness of his portrayal.
One of the most important motifs is that of a Saltarello which figures in the opera. This was taken by Habeneck (Paris Conservatoire) at so slow a pace at its first performance that Berlioz in his distraction found relief in decided infractions of the Third Commandment. His provocation was very great and he probably found satisfaction in profanity, but still more in directing the work himself at a later date, when he took this particular dance at a whirlwind tempo.
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ARIA, from "II re pastore,".........Mozart
Miss Frieda HEmpei,,
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was born January 27, 1756, at Salzburg; died December 5, 170.1, in Vienna.
When one reads the life history of this immortal genius, and reviews its check­ered aspects, reflects upon his disappointments and dwells upon the pathetic circum­stance that, at a time when all Europe was ringing with his praise, he was hurriedly cast into a pauper's grave,--it is little less than a marvel that up to the last few weeks of his life, when fortuitous circumstances, which he magnified into portents, led to a despondency that hastened his death, he should have faced the world and his misfor­tunes with a smile. This characteristic is reflected in most of his music, but there are Adagios in which we get glimpses of an appreciation of the greater depths of experience so forcibly portrayed by Beethoven, and in his operas, notably in the last act of "Don Juan," we discover a dramatic power that "might have solved the problem of the opera." Of his work as a symphonist--into the forms of which "he poured the lava stream of his genius until it overflowed''--to quote Wagner again, space for­bids more than mere mention, while the temptation to emphasize the range of his creative activity must be sternly resisted. He possessed the power--possible only to genius of the most exalted type--of making smaller forms vehicles for the expression of great thoughts. In passing it must be noted that this is an interesting phenomenon, clearly apparent to the intelligent and observant critic. In smaller forms many com­posers seem to have escaped from the limitations of their natures. Schubert was dramatic in his songs, but not in his symphonies; Schumann, sombre and brooding in most of his larger works, is sunshine itself in his lyrics, while Bach in his sacred songs is simple and naive, as Beethoven ceases to storm the heights and probe the depths in his "An die feme Geliebte" and "Adelaide." Mozart in his unpretentious compositions was not the composer of the "Requiem" or "Don Juan," but in them he displayed the qualities that must have been in the mind of one who escaped the fate of most of those who indulge in the dangerous practice of comparing geniuses who work in different, even though they be allied, fields--when he called him "the Raphael of Music." The aria on our program is taken from one of these lesser works--"II re pastore," a dramatic cantata, the general character of which is admirably portrayed by its title and the following text:
Dein bin ich, ja dein auf ewig! Treu im Gliicke und treu im Leide, All' mein Sinnen steht nur nach dir! Du, O Theure, du heiss Geliebte Mein Entziicken und all' meine Freude, Meinen Frieden find' ich bei dir!
Thine am I, forever thine!
True to thee in joy and love
My soul, my life reach out for thee!
Through thee, O dear one, fondly lives
All my joys--love's fervent glow,
And peace and comfort come to me.
First Concert 15
SYMPHONY, No. 7, A major, Op. 92.......Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven was born in Bonn, December 16, 1770; died in Vienna, May 26, 1827.
Poco SOSTENTJTO-VIVACE; ALLEGRETTO; PRESTO; AUEGRO Con BRIO.
The program, beginning with a characteristic overture by Berlioz, brings one of the greatest works of Ludwig van Beethoven,--the "Prophet of the Symphony" --he who first displayed the utmost possibilities of the form, gave to it distinction, and pointed to future glories.
In the presence of a work like a Beethoven symphony one realizes the inade­quacy of words to explain or describe all that it conveys to the soul. No composer has ever equaled Beethoven in his power of suggesting that which can never be expressed absolutely, and nowhere in his compositions do we find a work in which all the noblest attributes of an art so exalted as his more happily combine. No formal analysis, dealing with the mere details of musical construction can touch the real source of its power, nor can any interpretation of philosopher or poet state with any degree of certainty just what it was that moved the soul of the composer, though they may give us the impression the music makes on them. They may clothe in fitting words that which we all feel more or less forcibly. The philosopher, by observation of the effect of environment and conditions on man in general, may point out the probable relation of the outward circumstances of a composer's life at a certain period to his works; the poet, because he is peculiarly susceptible to the same influences as the composer, may give us a more sympathetic interpretation, but neither can ever fathom the processes by which a great genius like Beethoven gives us such a compo­sition as the symphony we are now considering.
The Seventh fairly pulsates with free and untrammelled melody, and has an atmo­sphere of its own quite unlike that of the others. It was written in 1812, and was first performed on December 8, 1813, at a concert in the large hall of the University of Vienna, a fact not "without significance in connection with the environment of the present occasion. Beethoven conducted in person, and the performance suffered some­what from the fact that he could scarcely hear the music his genius had created.
"The program," says Grove, in an admirable account of this most unique and interesting occasion, "consisted of three numbers: the symphony in A, described as 'entirely new,' two marches performed by Malzel's mechanical trumpeter with full orchestral accompaniment, and a second grand instrumental composition by 'Herr von Beethoven,'--the so-called 'Battle of Vittoria' (Op. 91)."
Malzel's mechanical genius had displayed itself before this through the invention of the "Panharmonion"--an instrument of the orchestrion type--and an automatic chess-player. Three years later he constructed the first metronome, for the invention of which he has received the credit that should be given to Winkel, of Amsterdam. It will be remembered that the exquisite Allegretto scherzando in Beethoven's Eighth Symphony is based on a theme from which the composer developed a canon, in com­pliment to Malzel.
No greater artistic incongruity can be conceived than the combination of a mechanical trumpeter, a composition like the "Battle of Vittoria," and this sublime
16 Official Program Book
symphony in A. The concert was arranged by Miilzel, and given in aid of a fund for wounded soldiers, and on benefit concert programs, as on those of "sacred" con­certs, one is never surprised at finding strange companionships.
Grove continues: "The orchestra presented an unusual appearance, many of the desks being tenanted by the most famous musicians and composers of the d'ay. Haydn had gone to his rest; but Romberg, Spohr, Mayseder and Dragonetti were present, and played among the rank and file of the strings. Meyerbeer (of whom Beethoven complained that he always came in after the beat) and Hummel had the drums, and Moscheles, then a youth of nineteen, the cymbals. Even Beethoven's old teacher, Kapellmeister Salieri, was there, 'giving time to the chorus and salvos.' The per­formance, says Spohr, was 'quite masterly,' the new works were both received with enthusiasm, the slow movement of the symphony was encored, and the success of the concert extraordinary."
Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven stand related to each other, in the evolution of the symphony, in a most interesting and logical sequence. Haydn may be compared to the first division of the sonata, in which are stated the themes, for he established its principles; Mozart, to the second division, in which the themes are developed and subjected to various treatments, for he revealed its plasticity; Beethoven, to the third, in which the themes are restated with added force and intensity, for he first displayed the utmost possibilities of the form, gave to it distinction and pointed to future glories. As was natural, with the passage of the years, however, the processes developed by Haydn, and extended by Mozart, had become somewhat stereotyped. Beethoven gave freedom to the symphony by removing these traditional interpretations.
Beethoven could not brook conventionality, and so, at the very outset, we find that the sustained introduction--A major, common time, poco sostenuto, which in Haydn's time was naught but a foil to the Allegro proper--is full of meaning. The alternating themes of oboe, clarinet, and horn attract the attention immediately, and
no less beautiful are the episodes for woodwind. Ascending scale passages for the strings, following each other in logical sequence, lead us onward, until, after what appear to be tentative attempts at the establishment of a new rhythmical design, we are gently led into the Vivace, the first movement proper, in which gayety, naivite
First Concert 17
and poetry so happily combine, that, following the suggestions of the music, the query --Why not call this Beethoven's "Spring Symphony" --seems justified, in case we care to give our emotions definite direction.
The second subject--first violins and flutes, to the accompaniment of the other strings and woodwinds--so bright and cheery, and developed with the composer's keen sense of contrast and color, contributes materially to the atmosphere implied in our query.
No movement in the whole symphonic literature more thoroughly exemplifies the real spirit of the form than this, nor, incidentally, the value of conciseness. The Allegretto, A minor, 2-4 time,
with its vibration from major to minor; its broad melodies for the strings standing out against the constant metric pulsations, so suggestive of the Sapphic meter; the exquisite Cantabile in A major, separating the two statements of the principal subject matter, is as perennial in its charm as the "Unfinished Symphony" of Schubert. If the first movement suggests a lovely Spring landscape, this is a fleecy cloud that casts a faint shadow over the scene but neither fully conceals the sun nor hides aught of the beauty of the hills and meadows. In the Scherzo--F major, 3-4 time,
18 Official Program Book
Presto--we step for the nonce into the emerald shadows of the forest and witness the dance of the woodland fairies, while the trio--D major, Assai meno presto--is full
of calm and quiet. Then again the fairies, again the calm, and then, after a final repetition of the dance, the Finale. This movement--A major, 2-4 time, Allegro con
brio--is full of unbridled joy. With an intensity of rhythm that hurries us along through the elastic and sparkling second subject, and from climax to climax, it finally
ends with a furious rush, as though Beethoven found the idiomatic speech of music, which Richard Wagner says he created, lacking in power of utterance for such elation of spirit. Again the query--Why not call this, Beethoven's "Spring Symphony"
ARIA--"Caro Nome" (Rigoletto)........Vekdi
Miss Hempei,.
Fortunio Guiseppe Francesco Verdi was born at Roncole, Italy, October 9, 1813; died at Milan, January 17, jo.01.
"Rigoletto" was first produced at Venice, March 11, 1851. No opera of Verdi is more thoroughly in accord with the point of view of the Venetians than "Rigoletto," which overflows with the characteristics that appealed to the dwellers in that gay city, when, in 1637, the first public opera house in the world was opened, and which have not lost their power in these latter days. The story is superlatively disgusting, and unworthy of the beautiful music with which the composer so liberally endowed it. Seduction, murder, revenge, passion, a modicum of sentiment, and a trace of true love, are woven together into a tragedy that, in devilishness and inhumanity would have satisfied the librettists of Cavalli's day, who held up to ridicule all that was true and noble, and glorified all that was debasing. The opera was composed in forty days, and musically, it represents the earlier Verdi at his best.
First Concert 19
Gilda--'"I know his name!
Walter Malde I love thee, ev'ry fond thought for
thee I cherish." "Carv'd upon my inmost heart Is thy name forever more, Ne'er again from thence to part, Name of love that I adore. Thou to me art ever near, Ev'ry thought to thee will fly, Life for thee alone is clear, Thine shall be my parting sigh."
MARCH and VARIATIONS, from Symphony, "Rustic Wedding," Op. 26 Goujmark
Karl Goldmark was born at Keszthely, Hungary, May 18, 1832; died in Vienna, January 3, 1915.
The Karl Goldmark of the "Sakuntala" overture and the "Queen of Sheba," who in these works gives us oriental fantasy and opulent orchestral color, in the "Rustic Wedding" symphony reveals simplicity and naivete. These characteristics are also to be found in many of his later works, notably in "Das Heimchen am Herd," based on Charles Dickens' "Cricket on the Hearth."
As Elgar in these modern days in the "Enigma" variations gives characterizations of certain of his friends, so Goldmark more than a quarter of a century ago (the work was given its first performance March 10, 1876), in this theme and variations suggested the church and the groups of guests entering its portals to attend the service.
As illustrative of environment and atmosphere what could be simpler than the following theme, which, after being given out by the 'celli and1 contra-basses, is made the basis of thirteen variations
Var. I.--The theme appears in the first horn accompanied by the violoncellos and double basses pizzicato, and by the second and fourth horns. Later, two trumpets and wood-wind instruments are added.
Var. II.--Poco animato.--The strings, imitatively employed, have the most im­portant share in the unfolding of the variation. Only the clarinets and bassoons are employed occasionally to reinforce the harmony.
Var. III.--Allegro.--The full orchestra is employed, the trombones, violoncellos, double basses and bassoons giving out a marked variation of the theme, over which the remainder of the orchestra play incisive chords on the unaccented beats of the. measures.
Var. IV.--B flat minor, Andante con moto Quasi Allegretto, 6-8 time.--The first violins begin the variation with an expressive melody which, for a few measures, is canonically imitated by the second violins. The scoring becomes cumulatively richer
ao Official Program Book
as the movement is unfolded, much use being made of a 16th note figure first an­nounced in the accompaniment by the violas.
Var. V.--E flat major, Allegretto, frisch, nicht schleppend, 3-4 time.--The theme is given to the violoncellos, double-basses, bassoons and horn, the first and third horns playing a counter subject, with a staccato figure working against it in the first and second violins. The violas are silent throughout the variation.
Var. VI.--Allegro vivace, 6-8 time.--A light, scherzo-like motive is tossed back and forth by the wood-wind and strings alternately.
Var. VII.--E flat minor, Allegro pesante, 3-4 time.--This variation is more fully scored than the previous one, and consists, for the most part, of an elaboration of the continuously moving figure in quarter notes--the first and third in the measure being accented--with which it begins in the full orchestra (trombones excepted).
Var. VIII.--E. flat major, Allegro schersando, 2-4 time.--The theme is given out by the horns, a light figure moving against it in the wood-wind and in the strings pizzicato. The bassoons, trumpets, trombones and kettledrums do not enter at all.
Var. IX.--E flat minor, Allegretto quasi Andantino, 3-8 time.--A melody in the oboe is imitated at the second measure by the second violins. The first violins take up this theme, and continue it to the end, the clarinet putting in a counter subject, as in a duet. The variation ends in E flat major.
Var. X.--E flat major, Molto vivace, 3-8 time.--The theme is suggested in the pizzicato of the strings, over which the first violins carry a rapid and continually moving figure in sixteenth notes.
Var. XI.--E flat minor, Andante con moto, 6-8 time.--A plaintive mood is made manifest in this variation, the rhythmical outline of which is based, for the most part, upon the figure with which its melody opens in the first violins. The variation ends softly in E flat major.
Var. XII.--B major, Moderato, 2-2 time.--The wood-wind instruments open this variation, the oboes carrying the theme proper. A solo first violin, second violin and viola enter later.
Finale.--E flat major, Tempo des Thema 2-4 time.--After two introductory meas­ures in the trumpets the theme upon which the variations have been constructed is heard ff in the full orchestra. A long diminuendo is brought about by the gradual elimination of instrument after instrument until finally the violoncellos and double basses are left--as at the beginning of the movement--entirely to themselves.
SCENA AND ARIA (Mad-Scene) "Lucia di Lammermoor" . . Donizetti
Gaetano Donizetti was born at Bergamo, Italy, November 20, 1797; died there April 8, 1848.
Miss Hempei,.
It is little wonder that an opera whose plot was drawn from one of the greatest works of the Scottish genius, Sir Walter Scott, and set by one whose claim to genius is incontestible, should achieve unbounded success. One is not obliged to admit that the ideals of the period in which this opera was written, are such as do not find uniSD
First Concert 21
versal acceptance in this day and age of the world, to recognize the power displayed in directions that we neglect--more's the pity! The accusation that the composers of the illustrious group to which Donizetti belonged blindly bowed in adoration before an idol--"Melody," should lose some of its force when we realize that the strongest indictment brought against modern music is the fact that, too frequently, a total lack of melodic invention is concealed by abstruse schemes of harmonization, and gorgeous, --some say "opulent" while others say "garish"--orchestral colorings. It has been urged that such an episode as depicted in the "Mad Scene" on our program could never have been portrayed in terms of colorature and bravura, but can anyone define the limits of madness or its expression Any person conversant with the novel will realize how stern the necessity and how urgent the need that find vent in these mel­odies. Wagner or Strauss would in all probability have found other means of expres­sion, but they might, or might not, have been equally effective.
Lucia had a distinct artistic personality, displayed in earlier scenes, and in this revelation of an outraged1 soul, the distorted images of her brain must have been reflections of her former self, else there could have been none but false notes in the score. To criticise Donizetti from the point of view of Verdi or Wagner is inane. We must accept certain premises if we wish to determine whether the resulting con­clusions are logical. Let us therefore try to place ourselves in the position of the listener of more than four score years ago, and enjoy without questioning.
The text is as follows :
Lucia :--On my ear softly falls his sweet voice beseeching, Ah! voice beloved, my heart's depths even reaching! Thine Edgar, once more behold me! Yes, Edgar, mine own! Thine own behold me, no more thy foes a captive hold me. Cold shudders o'er my frame seem to creep! Trembles each member, falter my steps. Near yonder fountain set thou awhile beside me. Ah; me! see yonder phantom so dreaded, Alas! Dear Edgar ! Rise now to part us. Yet shall we meet, dear Edgar before the altar,
deck'd forthwith with roses! Hark to those strains celestial! '
Say dost thou hear them Ah. 'Tis the nuptial hymn sounding The rites for us are preparing; Dear Edgar, ah! Ah: Joy unbounded, This bliss our hearts o'erflowing-What winds can measure The incense that rises.
Brightly shine forth the tapers shedding their lustre. Comes forth the priest now, Stretch forth now thy right hand, Ah! day of gladness! Thine am I forever--thou mine forever!
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Heav'n makes me thine now forever.
Dearest the world's each pleasure
Henceforth with thee now sharing,
Life shall resemble a treasure
On us by heav'n bestowed.
While thy sad tears are flowing
On the turf o'er me growing,
I with the pow'rs of heaven will intercede for thee.
When there thy form I see
What joy, ah, what joy for me!
"MIDSOMMERVAKA"--"Midsummer Wake".....Alfven
Hugo Alfven was born in Stockholm, May I, 1872; still living.
This rhapsody, in programs called "Swedish," probably from the fact that the composer draws so largely upon Swedish folk-themes for his motives, is instinct with life and motion. The kinship between many of these folk-melodies and those of North Germany has been repeatedly pointed out, but, as a matter of fact, with a few exceptions, the material of all folk-songs is closely related.
The composer was a student at the Conservatory at Stockholm from 1887 to 1890. Later he studied the violin with Cesar Thompson. In 1910 he became the musical director of the University of Upsala. Inasmuch as his career has been an honorable one, as he has given to the world several important symphonic works, as well as com­positions in the minor forms, why should not this gifted Swede, who was born on May Day, write such a glowing apostrophe of mid-summer even of the "St. Johannis-feir" (the night of June 24-25). The score not being available, the following analysis is quoted from Felix Borowski :
Allegro moderato, D major, 2-4 time. At the fifth measure the first subject is given out by the clarinet, over a pizzicato accompaniment played by all the strings. It is repeated by the flute and oboe in octaves, afterward by the bassoon and finally forte by the violins. A new idea is foreshadowed burles-camente, in the bassoon, the real subject being given out a few measures later by the bassoons and horns in unison. This is developed, sometimes in conjunction with the first theme. A ritardando leads into a new section (Andante) in which after some preliminary matter in the strings, the English horn sings an expressive melody, the violoncellos accompanying it with a figure taken from the opening theme. The horn takes up this melody (tremolo in the strings) and after it the strings give it out forte--Allegretto, G major, 2-4 time. With this change of tempo and key, a contrasted subject of dance-like character is introduced, its material being announced by the violins pianissimo. This is worked over, and eventually is succeeded by another division (Allegro con brio, D major, 3-4 time) its subject being given to the violins over a counterpoint in the basses and bas­soons. Later there is heard against this a counter theme in the horns, and still later in a muted trumpet. A coda brings the work to a brilliant conclusion.
"Nineteenth Program, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, February 19 and 20, 1915.
SECOND CONCERT
Thursday Evening, May 18
"PARADISE LOST," Op. 125.........Bossi
Symphonic Poem in a Prologue and Three Parts, for Solo Voices, Chorus, Orchestra and Organ.
Characters
SATAN ) Â

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