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UMS Concert Program, February 23, 1925: Extra Concert Series -- Detroit Symphony Orchestra

UMS Concert Program, February 23, 1925: Extra Concert Series -- Detroit Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, February 23, 1925: Extra Concert Series -- Detroit Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, February 23, 1925: Extra Concert Series -- Detroit Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, February 23, 1925: Extra Concert Series -- Detroit Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, February 23, 1925: Extra Concert Series -- Detroit Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, February 23, 1925: Extra Concert Series -- Detroit Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, February 23, 1925: Extra Concert Series -- Detroit Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, February 23, 1925: Extra Concert Series -- Detroit Symphony Orchestra image
Day
23
Month
February
Year
1925
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Concert: Fourth
Complete Series: CCCCXXIII
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan

SSI
UNIVERSITY MUSICALSOCIETY
Extra (tiantttt
Sixth Season Fourth Concert
No. CCCCXXIII Complete Series
Detroit Symphony Orchestra
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Conductor VICTOR KOLAR, Assistant Conductor
Soloists
GUY MAIER, LEE PATTISON and ARTHUR SHATTUCK
Pianists
8jUl Auditorium, Ann Arbor, JHirijujan
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1925, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK
PROGRAM FUNERAL MUSIC from "Gotterdammerung".
. Wagner
In Memoriam
MARION LEROY BURTON 18741925
SEVENTH SYMPHONY, A major, Op. 92............Beethoven
Poco sostenuto--vivace; Allegretto; Presto; Allegro con brio.
CONCERTO in C major, for Three Pianos and Orchestra.....Bach
Allegro; Adagio; Allegro. Messrs. Maier, Pattison and Shattuck
INTERMISSION
SUITE "Peer Gynt", No. 1, Op. 46.........................Grieg
Morning Mood; Ase's Death; Anitra's Dance; In the Hall of the Mountain King.
CONCERTO PATHETIQUE for Two Pianos and Orchestra. .Liszt
Messrs. Maier and Pattison.
The audience will refrain from applause at the conclusion of the Funeral Music.
Messrs. Maier, Pattison and Shattuck use the Steinway Piano. The Mason and Hamlin is the official piano of the Detroit Symphony Society.
Program
Funeral Music from Act III, "Gotterdammerung"..................Wagner
Wilhelm Richard Wagner was born May 22, 1813, in Leipzic; died February 13, 1883, in Venice.
The events in the musicdrama which immediately precede Siegfried's death may be stated briefly as follows: Siegfried arrives at the appointed place and finds the hunting party. Being extremely thirsty he asks for a draught of mead. This is handed to him by Hagen who squeezes into it the juice of an herb which counteracts the effect of the magic_ drink, which, previously given him by Gutrun, had beclouded his memory of Brunhilde and their love. Being asked to relate his adventures he tells of the experiences which form the story of Siegfried (the third musicdrama of the Nibelungen cycle of which the fourth and final is Gotterdamme rung.) When he sings of Brunhilde his Walkyrwife, and their love, Hagen springs to his feet, and shouting "He is a traitor and a perjurer," slays him.
As twilight falls, Siegfried is borne back to the hall where waits Brunhilde. The music which accompanies this scene is more than a funeral march; it is an eloquent and touching fun eral oration without words. At that point in the drama, words have become powerless; music alone can express the emotional mood which is almost superhuman.
In quick succession, we hear the motives which recall the events preceding Siegfried's birth, the course of his life, and as a climax, "the glorious Siegfried motive, heard for the first time in all its inherent power of suggestion, for Siegfried, dying, has triumphed." As the procession moves along, the motives of Nibelung's Woe, the Sword, Siegfried and Death make vivid in our minds the significant acts and incidents in the life of the hero.
It is as though we were standing with bowed heads in a great cathedral, down the aisles of which a hero is being borne to his entombment. In the same attitude may we listen to this sublime music--and refrain from applause.
Symphony, No. 7, A major, Op. 92..............................Beethoven
Poco SostenutoVivace; Allegretto; Presto; Allegro con brio. Ludwig van Beethoven was born in Bonn, De cember 16, 1770; died in Vienna, May 26, 1827.
"The Seventh Symphony fairly pulsates with free melody, and has an atmo sphere of its own quite unlike that of the others. It was written in 1812, and was first per formed on December 8, 1813, at a concert in the large hall of the University of Vienna, a fact not without significance in connection with the environment of the present occasion. Beethoven, conducted in person, and the performance suffered somewhat from the fact that he could scarcely hear the music his genius had created."
"The program," says Grove, in an admirable account of this most unique and interesting occasion, "consisted of three numbers: the symphony in A, described as 'entirely new,' two marches performed by Malzel's mechanical trumpeter with full orchestral accompaniment, and a second grand instrumental composition by 'Herr von Beethoven,'--the socalled 'Battle of Vittoria' (Op. 91). The orchestra presented an unusual appearance, many of the desks being tenanted by the most famous musicians and composers of the day. Haydn had gone to his rest; but Romberg, Spohr, Mayseder and Dragonetti were present, and played among the rank and file of the strings. Meyerbeer (of whom Beethoven complained that he always came in after the beat) and Hummel had the drums, and Moscheles, then a youth of nineteen, the cymbals. Even Beethoven's old teacher, Kapellmeister Salieri, was there, 'giving time to the chorus and salvos.' The performance, says Spohr, was 'quite masterly.' the new works were both received with enthusiasm, the slow movement of the symphony was encored, and the success of the concert extraordinary."
As in the case of other symphonies by Beethoven, there have been various programs or interpretations read into this. Richard Wagner declared it to be the apotheosis of the dance, and Alberti, discovers it to be an expression of German jubilation at being delivered from the yoke of France. Prod'homme collected other opinions. A writer in the Gazette Musicale (Paris) asserted that the symphony was intended to represent a rustic wedding with the fol lowing program: First movement--Arrival of the Villagers; Second--Wedding March; Third --Dance of the Villagers; Fourth--Feast and Revels. It was declared that this program ema nated from Beethoven himself, an assertion which Prod'homme believes to have originated with Wilhelm von Lenz. Joseph Louis d'Ortigue imagined that the Allegretto represented a procession in the catacombs, and Durenberg, less lugubriously inclined, believed it to be rather "the dream of a lovely odalisque."
Concerto in C major for Three Pianos and Orchestra.................Bach
Johann Sebastian Bach was born March 21, 1685, at Eisenach, died July 28, 1750, at Leipzic.
There is a tradition, which Spitta, who was an authority on the life and works of the master, believes is based on fact, to the effect that Bach wrote the two concertos for three claviers (the present one in C major and its companion in D minor) in order to play them with his two eldest sons. If this be true the concerto played this evening must have been written about 173033. No autograph score has been found but there exist five manuscript scores and two sets of parts some of which are in D major and some in C major. The weight of evidence indicates that the latter key was the original.
It will be noted that the orchestral portion of the concerto employs only the string family and that the material allotted to the pianos differs materially from that usually expected in a concerto for this instrument. There is an absence of virtuoso passages as such. Bach had in mind the ensemble of three pianos and strings, rather than the display of any single performer or instrumental color at the expense of the whole.
Concerning the C major concerto, Albert Schweitzer wrote in his Scbastien Bach, le musicienpoete (Paris, 1905) :
"The second concerto--it is not agreed whether the original key is C major or D major is planned on larger lines than the first (D Minor), and the orchestra plays a more important part in it. In the Adagio there are even tutti passages in which the three claviers merely accompany the orchestra. The tonal and rhythmical effects that Bach has achieved with the three claviers are indescribable. At every hearing of these works we stand amazed before the mystery of so incredible a power of invention and combination.
The tempi and keys of the three movements of the concerto are as follows:
1. Allegro, C major.
2. Adagio, A minor.
3. Allegro, C major.
Suite, "Peer Gynt", No. 1, Op. 46..................................Grieg
Morning Mood Ase's Death
Anitra's Dance
In the Hall of the Mountain King
Edvard Hagerup Grieg was born June 15, 1843, at Bergen, Norway; Died September 14, 1907, at Bergen.
Grieg, the greatest of the Scandinavian composers, is best known to the musical world through his Concerto in A minor and the incidental music to "Peer Gynt". For concert use the latter has been arranged in two suites of which the first is the most popular.
In the suite the four numbers make no pretense to dramatic continuity, nor do they attempt to outline the story of the Ibsen drama. They vividly present four episodes. The first section, "Morning in the Mountain" is the prelude to Act IV, depicting the break of day, and Peer's musings as he surveys the world in the first rays of dawn. The second, "Ase's Death" serves to introduce Act III, at the close of which Peer's mother dies. Anitra's Dance is from the incidental music to Act IV; Peer, in an oasis of the desert whither his travels have carried him sits drinking coffee and smoking a long pipe, while Anitra, a Bedouin girl, and her com panions dance before him. The final episode, "In the Hall of the Mountain King," returns to Norway, among the trolls of the mountain, whom Peer visits in the second act. The Trolls pursue him, quicker and quicker, till, with a mighty crash of the full orchestra, they lay hands on him; one can hear Peer's cry of "Help, I am dying".
Concerto Pathetique for Two Pianos and Orchestra..................Liszt
Franz Liszt was born October 22, 1811, at Raiding, Hungary; died July 31, 1886, at Bayreuth.
The literature for two pianos and orchestra contains an unexpected wealth of interesting material both in classical and modern styles. Liszt's contribution, representing the romantic dramatic age of pianism with its abundant technical development, while not originally written in its present form (the orchestration has been done by Mr. Pattison) serves as an important land mark in the evolution that has taken place between the limpid, crystalline style of writing in the concertos of Bach and Mozart and the realistic, vivid and frequently cacophonous expres sion of the contemporary compositions for two pianos by Sowerby, Bliss, Hill and others.
THIRTYSECOND ANNUAL MAY FESTIVAL
EARL V. MOORE, Musical Director Six Concerts Four Days May 20, 21, 22, 23
ARTISTS, ORGANIZATIONS AND PROGRAMS (Subject to Change)
First Concert--Wednesday Evening, May 20
SOLOISTS
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH......................................Pianist
(Distinguished Piano Virtuoso and Orchestral Conductor) CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA......Frederick Stock, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "Leonore" No. 3..................................Beethoven
SYMPHONY No. 1, B flat, Op. 39..............................Schumann
Andante un poco maestoso--allegro molto vivace; Larghetto;
Scherzo--molto vivace; Allegro animato e grazioso SYMPHONIC POEM, "Don Juan".................................Strauss
Intermission
CONCERTO for Pianoforte and Orchestra, B flat minor, Op. 23... Tschaikovsky
Andante non troppo e molto maestoso--Allegro con spirito; Andantino
semplice--Allegro vivace assai; Finale: Allegro con fuoco
Mr. Gabrilowitsch
Second Concert--Thursday Evening, May 21
SOLOISTS
EMILY STOKES HAGAR......................................Soprano
"Splendidly equipped oratorio interpreter".
RHYS MORGAN................................................Tenor
"The logical successor to Evan Williams".
CHARLES TITTMANN...........................................Bass
"Preeminent Bach and oratorio singer".
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION............Earl V. Moore, Conductor
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA......Frederick Stock, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "Night on a Bare Mountain"....................Moussorgsky
"THE BELLS"............................................Rachmaninoff
Poem by Edgar Allen Poe
Soli, University Choral Union and Orchestra
1. The Silver Bells
Mr. Morgan and Chorus
2. The Golden Bells
Miss Hagar and Chorus
3. The Brazen Bells
Chorus
4. The Mournful Bells
Mr. Tittmann and Chorus
Intermission SELECTIONS from "B minor Mass"................................Bach
1. Chorus, "Kyrie Eleison"
2. Aria, "Quoniam Tu"
Mr. Tittmann
3. Duet, "Domine Deus"
Miss Hagar and Mr. Morgan
4. Chorus, "Qui ToUis"
Aria "Benedictus"
Mr. Morgan Choruses, "Crucifixus" am
"Et Resurrexit" Aria, "Et In Spiritum"
Mr. Tittmann Chorus, "Sanctus"
Third Concert--Friday Afternoon, May 22
SOLOISTS
LORETTA DEGNAN.........................................Contralto
"A voice of unusual range and power". CHILDREN'S FESTIVAL CHORUS............J. E. Maddy, Conductor
PROGRAM
(a) Friendship..................................................Haesche
(b) Now the Day is Over........................................Barnby
(c) Stars of the Summer Night.................................Woodbury
Boys' Chorus
ARIA, "Ah! mon fils" from "Le Prophete".......................Meyerbeer
Miss Degnan
(a) Indian Mountain Song.......................................Cadman
(b) Spinning Chorus from "Flying Dutchman"......................Wagner
High School Girls' Glee Club
Angelus from "Scenes Pittoresques"........................MassenetMaddy
Harp Ensemble
(a) Land Sighting................................................Grieg
(b) Massa Dear.................................................Dvorak
Boys' Glee Club
(a) Supplication................................................LaForge
(b) Dawn in the Desert............................................Ross
(c) The Rain Song................................................Hahn
(d) Bolero...................................................... .Arditi
Miss Degnan
CANTATA, "Legend of Bregenz"..................................Bendall
Children's Chorus
Fourth Concert--Friday Evening, May 22
SOLOISTS
GIACOMO LAURIVOLPI.......................................Tenor
(Metropolitan Opera Company) CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA......Frederick Stock, Conductor
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "Carnival"..........................................Dvorak
SYMPHONY, No. 3, F major.....................................Brahms
Allegro con brio; Andante; Poco Allegretto; Allegro
ARIA, "Flower Song" from "Carmen"................................Bizet
Mr. LauriVolpi
Intermission
ARIA, "Improviso" from "Andrea Chenier"........................Giordano
Mr. LauriVolpi
SUITE, "Through the Looking Glass"........................DeemsTaylor
Dedication--The Garden of Live Flowers; Jabberwocky; Looking Glass Insects; The White Knight.
ARIA, "Rudolph's Narrative" from "La Boheme".....................Puccini
Mr. LauriVolpi Ascent of Brunhilde's Rock and Finale from "Siegfried"..............Wagner
Fifth Concert--Saturday Afternoon, May 23
SOLOISTS
MISCHA ELMAN.............................................Violinist
"Favorite Concert Artist".
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA......Frederick Stock, Conductor
PROGRAM
SUITE, No. 3, D major............................................Bach
SYMPHONY, No. 4, F minor, Op. 35........................Tschaikovsky
Andante Sostenuto--Moderato con anima; Andantino in modo di can zona; Scherzo: Pizzicato ostinato; Finale: Allegro con fuoco.
Intermission
CONCERTO for Violin, No. 3, B minor, Op. 61..................SaintSaens
Allegro non troppo; Andantino quasi allegretto; Finale: molto moderato
e maestoso.
Sixth Concert--Saturday Evening, May 23
SOLOISTS FRANCES PERALTA.........................................Soprano
(Metropolitan Opera)
AUGUSTA LENSKA....................................MezzoSoprano
(Chicago Civic Opera)
KATHRYN MEISLE.........................................Contralto
(Chicago Civic Opera)
MARIO CHAMLEE..............................................Tenor
(Metropolitan Opera)
VICENTE BALLESTER......................................Baritone
(Metropolitan Opera)
HENRI SCOTT...................................................Bass
(Metropolitan Opera)
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION CHICAGO
:ty choral union )
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA f ?Earl v Moore Conductor
PROGRAM
"LA GIOCONDA".............................................Ponchielli
An Opera in four acts
Cast
La Gioconda..............................................Frances Peralta
Laura....................................................Augusta Lenska
La Cieca..................................................Kathryn Meisle
Enzo......................................................Mario Chamlee
Barnaba.................................................Vicente Ballester
Alvise.......................................................Henri Scott
Townspeople, Sailors, Etc. University Choral Union
Course Festival Tickets
Mail orders for course tickets will be filled in the order of receipt as indicated below:
If prefestival coupon is presented please deduct $3.00 from the prices quoted below.
BLOCK A.--Patron's Tickets--$7.00 Each.
(This includes Sections 2, 3, 4 (center) on the Main Floor and Sections 7, 8, 9 (center) in the First Balcony.) Patrons of Record for current PreFestival Series may retain their present locations, provided their order is received not later than February 28 on special blanks which have been mailed out.
Other subscribers for seats in this block will be assigned to such locations as shall not have been claimed by subscribers of record.
BLOCK B.--$6.00 Each.
(This includes Sections 1 and 5 (side) on the Main Floor and Sections 6 and 10 (side) in the First Balcony.
BLOCK C.--$5.50 Each.
This includes the first sixteen rows in the Second Balcony.
BLOCK D.--$5.00 Each.
This includes the remaining seats in the Second Balcony.
Checks should be made payable to the UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC, and orders addressed to
CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC
EARL V. MOORE, Musical Director
SUMMER SESSION
Six Weeks June 22 to August 1
FACULTY
PIANO
GUY MAIER MABEL ROSSRHEAD OTTO J. STAHL NELL B. STOCKWELL AVA COMINCASE
VOICE
THEODORE HARRISON NORA WETMORE
VIOLIN
f ANTHONY J. WHITMIRE MARIAN STRUBLEFREEMAN
ORGAN
PALMER CHRISTIAN
PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC
J. E. MADDY
T. P. GIDDINGS Guest Instructor THEORY
tOTTO J. STAHL BYRL FOX BACHER
Head of the Department. TActing Head of the Department.
COURSES
Private lessons in Piano, Voice, Violin, Organ. Class Courses in Normal Methods for Piano and Theory of Music. Class Courses in Methods for Supervisors of Vocal and Instrumental Music in the Public Schools.
FEES
TUITION RATES for private lessons vary from $15 to $75 for the session depending upon instructor chosen and length of periods.
FEES for all class courses $15 each.
Orchestral and Band Instruments, Studios equipped with Piano for practice, may be rented at reasonable rates.
For detailed information communicate with
CHARLES A. SINK, Secretary.
THB ANN ARMR

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