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UMS Concert Program, Noverber 5, 1926: Choral Union Series --

UMS Concert Program, Noverber 5, 1926: Choral Union Series --  image UMS Concert Program, Noverber 5, 1926: Choral Union Series --  image UMS Concert Program, Noverber 5, 1926: Choral Union Series --  image UMS Concert Program, Noverber 5, 1926: Choral Union Series --  image UMS Concert Program, Noverber 5, 1926: Choral Union Series --  image UMS Concert Program, Noverber 5, 1926: Choral Union Series --  image UMS Concert Program, Noverber 5, 1926: Choral Union Series --  image UMS Concert Program, Noverber 5, 1926: Choral Union Series --  image
Day
5
Month
November
Year
1926
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Rights Held By
University Musical Society
OCR Text

Concert: Second
Complete Series: CCCCLII
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan

.............
01 Jynral Itttntt
Fortyeighth Season Second Concert
No. CCCCLII Complete Series
THE ENGLISH SINGERS
FLORA MANN NELLIE CARSON LILLIAN BERGER
NORMAN STONE NORMAN NOTLEY CUTHBERT KELLY
3Itll Auditorium, Att Arbor,
FRIDAY, NOVERBER 5, 1926, AT EIGHT O'CLOCK
PROGRAM
MOTETS:
Praise Our Lord...................................William Byrd (15431623)
Ave Verum .......................................William Byrd (15431623)
Hosanna to the Son of David...................Thomas Weelkes (15751623)
MADRIGALS AND A BALLET:
0 softly singing lute ..........................Francis Pilkington (15621638)
Tho' Amaryllis dance..............................William Byrd (15431623)
On the Plains...................................Thomas Weelkes (15751623)
Stay, Corydon......................................John Wilbye (15741638)
FOLK SONGS: ....................Arranged by R. Vaughan Williams (1872--)
The Darkeyed Sailor The Turtle Dove Wassail Song
Intermission
ITALIAN STREET CRIES:
Chimney Sweeps ...................................Jacques du Pont (c.1600)
Rag and Bone ............................Adriano Banchieri (c.15651634)
Hot Chestnuts ......................................Jacques du Pont (c.1600)
DUETS AND TRIO:
1 spy Celia .......................................Henry Purcell (16581695)
John, come kiss me now (16th Century) . .. .Arranged by B. W. Naylor (1867) The Three Fairies...............................Henry Purcell (16581695)
MADRIGALS, BALLET AND CANZONET:
Hark, all ye lovely Saints......................Thomas Weelkes (15751623)
The Silver Swan................................Orlando Gibbons (15831625)
I go before, my Darling..........................Thomas Morley (15581603)
My Phyllis bids me pack away..................Thomas Weelkes (15751623)
Tour Under the Direction of Metropolitan Musical Bureau, New York, N. Y.
PROGRAM
Motet.............................................William Byrd
Praise our Lord, all yc Gentiles,
Praise Him, all ye people,
Because His mercy is confirmed upon us,
And His truth remained! for ever. Amen.
Motet ..............................................William Byrd
Ave verum corpus, narum De Maria Virgine Vere passum, immolaium In cruce pro homine Cujus latus perforatum Unda fluxit sanguine.
Esto nobis praegustatum In mortis examine, O Dulcis, o pie, o Jesu fili Mariae miserere mei.
Motet ...........................................Thomas Weelkes
Hosanna to the Son of David: blessed be the King that cometh in the Name of the Lord, Hosanna! Hosanna! Thou that sittest in the highest heavens. Hosanna in excelsis deol
Madrigal ...................................... Francis Pilkington
O softly singing Lute, See with my tears thou time do keep.
Yet softly, gentle strings, Agree with Love that cannot sleep.
Sorrow hist whenas it sings, When tears do fall then sighs arise, So grief oft shines in most sad eyes, Yea, love through heart it dies, it dies.
Madrigal...........................................William Byrd
Though Amaryllis dance in green,
Like fairy queen;
And sing full clear
Corinna can, with smiling cheer,
Yet since their eyes make heart so sore,
Heigh ho, heigh ho, I'll love no morr
Love ye who list, I force him not,
Sith God it wot,
The more I wail,
The less my sighs and tears prevail.
What shall I do but say therefore,
Heigh ho, heigh ho, I'll love no more.
Ballet...........................................Thomas Weelkes
On the Plains Fairy trains
Were atreading measures. Satyrs played, Fairies stayed
As the stops set leisures. Fa la la.
Nymphs begin To come in
Quickly, thick and threefold. Now they dance. Now they prance,
Present there to behold. Fa la la.
Madrigal........................................... John Wilbys
Stay, Corydon, thou swain, Talk not so soon of dying,
What though thy heart be slain, What though thy love be flying.
She threatens thee but dares not strike,
Thy nymph is light and shadowlike; For if thou follow her, she'll fly from thee, But if thou fly from her, she'll follow thee.
Folk Song............................Arr. by R. Vaughan Williams
"The Darkeyed Sailor." It was a comely young lady fair Was walking out for to take the air; She met a sailor all on her way, So I paid attention to what they did say.
Said William, "Lady, why walk alone
The night is coining and the day near gone."
She said, while tears from her eyes did fall,
"It's a darkeyed sailor that's proving my downfall."
"It's two long years since he left the land;
He took a gold ring from off my hand;
We broke the token, here's part with me
And the other lies rolling at the bottom of the sea."
Then half the ring did young William show,
She was distracted 'midst joy and woe,
"O welcome, William, I've lands and gold
For my darkeyed sailor, so manly, true and bold."
Then in a village down by the sea
They joined in wedlock and well agree.
So maids be true while your love's away,
For a cloudy morning brings forth a shinning day.
.Folk Song............................Arr. by R. Vaughan Williams
"The Turtle Dove." Fare ye well, my dear, I must be gone And leave you for a while; If I roam away I'd come back again Though I roam ten thousand mile.
As fair thou art my bonny lass
So deep in love am I;
But I never will prove false to the bonny lass I love
Till the stars fall from the sky.
The sea will never run dry, my dear
Nor the rocks never melt with the sun;
But I never will prove false to the bonny lass I love
Till all these things be done.
O yonder doth sit that little turtle dove He doth sit on yonder high tree, Amaking a moan for the loss of his love As I will do for thee.
Folk Song............................Arr. by R. Vaughan Williams
"Wassail Song."
Wassail, Wassail, all over the town, Our bread it is white and our ale it is brown, Our bowl it is made of the green maple tree, In the wassail bowl we'll drink unto thee.
Here's health to the ox and to his right eye, Pray God send our master a good Christmas pie, A good Christmas pie as e'er I did see, In the wassail bowl we'll drink unto thee.
Here's health to the ox and to his right horn, Pray God send our master a good crop of corn, A good crop of corn as e'er I did see, In the wassail bowl we'll drink unto thee.
Here's health to the ox and to his long tail, Pray God send our master a good cask of ale, A good cask of ale as e'er I did see, In the wassail bowl we'll drink unto thee.
Come, butler, come fill us a bowl of the best, Then I pray that your soul in heaven may rest; But if you do bring us a bowl of the small, May the devil take butler, bowl and all 1
Then here's to the maid in the lilywhite smock, Who tripped to the door and slipped back the lock Who tripped to the door and pulled back the pin For to let these jolly wassailers walk in.
Intermission
ITALIAN STREET CRIES:
"Chimney Sweeps" ..............................Jacques Du Pont
Sweep, sweep! we are the boys;
We come from the valley where all good boys live.
We'll brush and scrape your chimneys and
make the whole thing clean, and all for a shilling.
"Rag and Bone"...............................Adriano Banchieri
Rags or bones, ladies, for matches white and fine! The bundles are big and the sticks are small,
tied up with good string. The sulphur is green, and that's no j oke; it goes off with a fine smoke!
"Hot Chestnuts".................................Jacques Du Pont
Roast chestnuts hot! Who'll buy
They're round and fine, large at the bottom,
narrow at the top, and white in the middle;
and boiled and roasted, and fine and toasted. Five and five's ten, and five's fifteen,
and five's twenty, and five's twentyfive,
and five's thirty, and here's the odd one.
DUET:
"I Spy Celia"..............................
I spy Celia; Celia eyes'me.
I approach her; but she flies me.
I pursue; more coy I find her.
I seem colder; then she's kinder.
Her eyes charm me; my words move her.
She esteems me! and I love her.
In not blessing most she blesses, And not possessing, each possesses. Now she blushes, I grow bolder. She would leave me, but I hold her. She grows angry, I appease her. I am redder, then I please her.
.Henry Purcell
DUET:
Wife
Husband
Wife
"John, Come Kiss Me Now" 16th. Century . .Arr. by B. W. Naylor John, come kiss me now, John, come kiss me by and by, And make no more ado.
Peace, I'm angry now,
Peace, I'm angry at the heart
And know not what to do.
Wives can faine and wives can flatter,
Have I not hit them now,
When once they begin they still do chatter,
And so does my wife too.
And wives have many fair words and looks, And draw silly men on folly's hooks, John, come kiss me now.
Husband Now of my song I'll make an end. Lo, here, I quit thee now, All evil wives to the devil I send, Among them my wife too.
TRIO:
"The Three Fairies".............................Henry Purcell
When the cock begins to crow,
And the embers leave to glow,
And the owl cries, "Tuwhit, Tuwhoo,"
When the crickets do sing
And mice roam about,
And midnight bells ring
To call the devout;
When the lazy lie sleeping
And think it no harm,
Their zeal is so cold,
And their beds are so warm,
When the long lazy slut
Has not made the parlour clean,
No water on the hearth is put.,
But all things in disorder seem;
Then we trip it round the room
And make like bees a drowsy hum.
Be she Betty, Nan or Sue,
We make her of another hus,
And pinch her black and bine.
Ballet ...........................................Thomas Weelkes
Hark, all ye lovely saints atove, Diana hath agreed with Lovfr His fiery weapon to remove.
Do you not see
How they agree
Then cease, fair ladies, wny weep ye
Fa la la.
See, see your mistress bids yju cease, And welcome love with loves increase. Diana hath procured your p;ace.
Cupid hath sworn
His bow forlorn
To break and burn ere ladies mourn.
Fa la la.
Madrigal ........................................Orlando Gibbons
The Silver Swan, who, living, had no note,
When death approached, unlocked her silent throat,
Leaning her breast against the reedy shore,
Thus sung her first and last, and sung no more,
"Farewell all joys, O Death, come close mine eyes,
More geese than swans now live, more fools than wise."
Canzonet .........................................Thomas Morley
I go before, my darling.
Follow thou to the bower in the close alley;
There we will together
Sweetly kiss each other,
And like two wantons daily.
Madrigal ........................................Thomas Weelkes
My Phyllis bids me pack away, And yet she holds me in delay; I, weeping, cry, "My heart will break;" She tells me no, I need not speak, Then if my fortune fall not wrong I need not sing another song.
COMING EVENTS
PALMER CHRISTIAN, University Organist, in Twilight Recital Series. Complimentary, except that small children will not be admitted, every Wednesday, except when otherwise announced Hill Auditorium, 4:15 P. M. (Omitted Wednesday, Novem ber 10.)
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Samuel P. Lockwood, Conductor, Soloist, Walter Bloch, 'cello, in the Faculty Concert Series. Complimentary, except that small children will not be admitted, Hill Auditorium, Sunday, November 14, 4:15 P. M.
MORIZ ROSENTHAL, Pianist, in the Extra Concert Series, Mon day, November 29, 8:00 P. M. Tickets $1.00, $1.50 $2.00.
ROLAND HAYES, Negro Tenor, in the Extra Concert Series, Sat urday, December 4, 8:00 P. M. Tickets $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Ossip Gabrilowitsch,
Conductor, in the Choral Union Series, Monday, December 13, 8:00 P. M. Tickets $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
RUSSIAN COSSACK CHORUS, Sergei Socoloff, Conductor, in the Extra Concert Series, Tuesday, January 10, 8:00 P. M. Tickets $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
MARION TALLEY, Soprano, in the Choral Union Series, Monday, January 17, 8:00 P. M. Tickets $2.00, $2.50, $3.00.
FRITZ KREISLER, Violin, in the Choral Union Series, Monday, January 31, 8:00 P. M. Tickets $2,00, .$2.50, $3.00.
DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Ossip Gabrilowitsch, Conductor, in the Extra Concert Series, Monday, February 21, 8:00 P. M. Tickets $1.00, $1.50, $2.00.
GUIOMAR NOVAES, Pianist, in the Choral Union Series, Wed nesday, March 2, 8:00 P. M. Tickets $i.oo, $1.50, $2.00.
ROLAND HAYES
EMINENT NEGRO TENOR HILL AUDITORIUM DECEMBER 4, 1926
Reprinted from Vanity Fair
"We Nominate for the Hall of Fame:
ROLAND HAYES
Because he has been acclaimed throughout Europe and America as a great concert tenor; beqause he brings to his recitals not merely a lyric voice of great flexibility and beauty, but also a scholarly under standing of music and a gracious and compelling interpretation; because he puts to shame the average vocal artist by a positive mastery of the five languages in "which he sings; because his singing of the Negro Spirituals has in it a quality of revelation."
FROM THE HUMBLEST TO THE HIGHEST
The simple facts of Roland Hayes' career make a remarkable story.
As a boy, he worked on the small Georgia farmholding of his mother, an exslave. Despite poverty, he succeeded in educating himself, and attended Flsk University, at Nashville. He further managed to equip himself with a musical training. His tentative recitals met with so much encouragement that he resolved to try his fortune in Europe.
Reaching London in 1920, he had barely enough money to announce a recital. But that recital proved the turningpoint in his career. It was fol lowed by fifteen others to packed audiences and a summons from King George V to sing at Buckingham Palace.
There followed an invitation to appear with the Colonne Orchestra--an event which set all Paris talking about the remarkable newlyfound tenor.
When Vienna and Berlin heard him, incredulity changed to admiration. As Paris had particularly praised his diction and command of style in French songs, these capitals judged him in the German lieder as a model for their own singers.
Each city was at a loss to describe Roland Hayes' silken, ethereal tones, ?which were not quite like anything they had ever heard before. And in the Negro spirituals he laid a strange and wonderful treasury before them.
Then came his first tour of his own country, in 1923. This put the seal on his greatness. No singer in years has won such sudden and nationwide attention.
Since then, Roland Hayes has been devoting his winters to this country, and his summers to Europe. The European capitals await his annual return, and crowd to his recitals, but these he has had more and more to curtail on account of the pressure and exactions of his successive American tours.
From coast to coast, from Canada to our southernmost states, the mere announcement of a recital assures an overflowing audience. When he appears with our principal symphony orchestras, demonstrations are the rule. His singing has brought numberless critical and editorial eulogies, and magazine articles, showing a national interest by no means confined to our musical public.
An American audience now anticipates a recital by Roland Hayes as an experience rare beyond description.
TICKETS AT UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC--$1.00, $1.50, $2.00

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