Press enter after choosing selection

UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore

UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image UMS Concert Program, May 19: The Thirty-fourth Annual May Festival -- Earl V. Moore image
Day
1
Month
May
Year
1927
Download PDF
Rights Held By
University Musical Society
OCR Text

Season: 1926-1927
Concert: TWELFTH
Complete Series: CCCCLXVI
Hill Auditorium Ann Arbor, Michigan

thirty fourth c5nnual
cLLnitversity of Michigan
1927
a
CHORAL UNION S E R I E S -1 9 2 6 1 9 2 7
FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON EIGHTH CONCERT
NO. CCCCLXII
Second May Festival Concert
Thursday Evening, May 19, 8:00 O'clock
SOLOISTS
Elsie Baker, Contralto Arthur HACKETT-GRANvniE, Tenor
Betsy Lane Shepard, Soprano William Simmons, Bass
The University Choral Union The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Mr. Frederick Stock and Earl V. Moore, Conductors Mr. Palmer Christian, Organist
BEETHOVEN CENTENARY PROGRAM
! 3 flUttmnj of
3ffrattria H
President of the University Musical Society and Professor in the
University of Michigan.
AND
Dean of the Graduate School of the University of Michigan.
OVERTURE, "Leonore," Op. 72, No. 3 Beethoven
FUNERAL MARCH from "Eroica" Symphony Beethoven
MISSA SOLEMNIS in D, Op. 123 Beethoven
Quartet, Chorus, Organ and Orchestra
I. KYRIE
II. GLORIA
Gratias Agimus Qui Tollis Quoniam
Intermission
III. CREDO IV. SANCTUS
Osanna Et Incarnatus Benedictus
Crucifixus
V. AGNUS DEI Et Resurrexit Dona Nobis
The Third May Festival Concert will take place Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, and the Fourth May Festival Concert will take place Friday evening at 8:90 o'clock, May 20.
(OVER)
NOTICES
1. TRAFFIC REGULATIONS.--By order of the Police Department on the occasion of the May Festival concerts, vehicles of all kinds will be prohibited on North University Avenue, between Thayer and Ingalls Streets, Taxi-cabs must park on the West side of Thayer Street, facing South, between North University Avenue and Washington Street. Persons on foot are requested to refrain from leaving from Taxi-cab entrance side of the auditorium.
&. SPECIAL MOTOR BUSSES.--East for Detroit and West for Jackson and intervening points will leave Auditorium immediately after all concerts.
LOST ARTICLES should be inquired for at the office of Shirley W. Smith, Secretary of the University, in University Hall, where articles found should also be left.
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY will, as usual offer two series next year as follows:
THE FORTY NINTH ANNUAL CHORAL UNION SERIES, and the NINTH ANNUAL EXTRA CONCERT SERIES.
5. THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC will conduct a six weeks' sum mer school beginning June 27. Instruction in practically all branches of music will be offered. The faculty includes the following:
Mrs. George B. Khead, Maude Okkelberg, Otto J. Stahl, Nell B. Stockwell, Edith1 Koon, Donna Esselstyn, Piano; Theodore Harrison, James Hamilton, Nora B. Wetmore, Grace Johnson Konold, Eunice Northrup, Voice; Anthony J. Whitmire, Marian Struble-Freeman, Violin; Palmer Christian, Organ; Joseph E. Maddy, T. P. Giddings and David E. Mattern, Vocal and Instrumental Public School Methods; Otto J. Stahl, Byrl Fox Bacher and Earl V. Moore, Theory.
THE REGULAR SCHOOL YEAR will begin September 27. EARL V. MOORE, Musical Director; ALBERT LOCKWOOD, Head of the Piano Depart ment; Mrs. George B. Rhead, Mrs. Maud Okkelberg, Otto J. Stahl, Nell B. Stockwell, Edith B. Koon, Martha Merkle and Donna Esselstyn; THEODORE HARRI SON, Head of the Voice Department, James Hamilton, Nora Crane Hunt, Grace Johnson Konold, Nora B. Wetmore; SAMUEL P. LOCKWOOD, Head of Violin Department, Anthony J. Whitmire and Marian Struble Freeman; HANS PICK, Head of Violoncello Department; PALMER CHRISTIAN, Head of Organ Depart ment, Margaret MacGregor; OTTO J. STAHL, Head of Theory Department, Byrl Fox Bacher and Helen Snyder; JOSEPH E. MADDY, Head of Methods Depart ment, Juva Higbie.
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY IS ORGANIZED under an act of the State of Michigan, providing for the incorporation of associations not for pecuniary profit. Its purpose is "to cultivate the public taste for music." All fees are placed at the lowest possible point compatible with sound business principles, the financial side serving but as a means to an educational and artistic end, a fact duly recognized by the Treasury Department of the United States by exempting from War-Tax, admissions to concerts given under its auspices, and by the United States Postoffice Department in admitting its publica tions to second class privileges.
THE ANN ARBOR ART ASSOCIATION invites the May Festival guests to an Exhibition of Paintings by Contemporary American Artists in the West Gallery, Alumni Memorial Hall. A selected group of Canvasses from the Thirtyninth Annual American Exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago (November, 1926) will be shown every afternoon and Thursday and Saturday mornings during May Festival Week.
THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION of the University School of Music will hold its Annual Banquet (open to Faculty, graduates and former students) at the Michigan Union, Saturday, May 21, at 12 o'clock. Tickets ($1.00) should be pro cured from Mrs. Walter F. Hunt, 1030 Baldwin Avenue (telephone 5871) before Friday noon.
CHORAL UNION SERIES--1926-1927
FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON TWELFTH CONCERT
NO. CCCCLXVI COMPLETE SERIES
Sixth May Festival Concert
Saturday Evening, May 21, 8:00 O'clock
SOLOISTS Lots Johnston, Soprano FrEdericka S. Hull, Soprano
JEANNETTE van DER VepEN Reaume, Soprano
Sophis Braslau, Contralto Armand Tokatyan, Tenor
Royden Susumago, Tenor Orris Patton, Tenor
Lawrence Tibbett, Baritone James Wolfe, Bass
The University Choral Union The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Earl V. Moore, Conductor "CARMEN" an Opera in Four Acts Bizet
CAST
Don Jose, Corporal of Dragoons Armand Tokatyan
Escamillo, Toreador Lawrence Tibbett
Zuniga, Captain of Dragoons )
Morales, Officer } Jaws Wolfe
Carmen, A Gypsy Girl Sophie Braslau
Micaela, A Village Maiden Lois Johnston
Frasquita, Mercedes, Companions of Carmen
Fredcricka S. Hull, Jeannette van dcr Vepen-Reaume
El Dancairo, El Remendado Odra Ottis Palton, Royden Susumago
Smugglers, Dragoons, Gypsies, Cigarette-girls, Street-boys, etc
University Choral Union
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Earl V. Moore, Conductor
SYNOPSIS
Prelude
ACT I A Square in Seville.
Scene and Chorus. (Mtcaela, Morales, Chorus.)
Chorus of Street-Boys.
Chorus of Cigarette Girls. (Carmen.)
Habanera. (Carmen.)
Scene.
Duet. (Micaela, Don Jose.)
Chorus.
Song and Melodrama. (Carmen, Don Jose, Zuniga, Chorus.)
Seguidilla and Duet. (Carmen, Don Jose.)
Finale.
ACT II Lillas Pastia's Inn.
Gypsy Song. (Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes.)
Chorus.
Toreador Song. (Escamillo.)
Quintet. (Frasquita, Mercedes, Carmen,
El Remendado, El Dancairo.) Canzonetta. (Carmen, Don Jose.) Duet. (Carmen, Don Jose.) Finale.
Intermission Entr' Acte.
ACT III
A Wild Spot in the Mountains. Sextet and Chorus. Trio. (Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes.) Morceau D'EnsiJmble. Air. (Micaela.) Duet. (Escamillo, Don Jose.) Finale. Entr' Acte.
ACT IV
A Square in Seville. March and Chorus.
Duet and Final Chorus. (Carmen, Don Jose.)
COVER)
NOTICES
TRAFFIC REGULATIONSBy order of the Police Department on the occasion of the May Festival concerts, vehicles of all kinds will be prohibited oa North University Avenue, between Thayer and Ingalls Streets, Taxi-cabs must park on the West side of Thayer Street, facing South, between North ¦UniversityAvenue and Washington Street. Persons on foot are requested to refrain from leaving from Taxi-cab entrance side of the auditorium.
SPECIAL MOTOR BUSSES.--East for Detroit and West for Jackson and intervening points will leave Auditorium immediately after all concerts.
LOST ARTICLES should be inquired for at the office of Shirley W. Smith, Secretary of the University, in University Hall, where articles found should also be left.
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY will, as usual offer two series next year as follows:
THE FORTY NINTH ANNUAL CHORAL UNION SERIES, and the NINTH ANNUAL EXTRA CONCERT SERIES.
5. THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC will conduct a six weeks' sum mer school beginning June 27. Instruction in practically all branches of music will be offered. The faculty includes the following:
Mrs. George B. Rhead, Maude Okkelberg, Otto J. Stahl, Nell B. Stockwell, Edith Koon, Donna Esselstyn, Piano; Theodore Harrison, James Hamilton, Nora B. Wetmore, Grace Johnson Konold, Eunice Northrup, Voice; Anthony J. Whitmire, Marian Struble-Preeman, Violin; Palmer Christian, Organ; Joseph E. Maddy, T. P. Giddings and David E. Mattern, Vocal and Instrumental Public School Methods; Otto J. Stahl, Byrl Fox Bacher and Earl V. Moore, Theory.
THE REGULAR SCHOOL YEAR will begin September 27. EARL V. MOORE, Musical Director; ALBERT LOCKWOOD, Head of the Piano Depart ment; Mrs. George B. Rhead, Mrs. Maud Okkelberg, Otto J. Stahl, Nell B. Stockwell, Edith B. Koon, Martha Merkle and Donna Esselstyn; THEODORE HARRI SON, Head of the Voice Department, James Hamilton, Nora Crane Hunt, Grace Johnson Konold, Nora B. Wetmore; SAMUEL P. LOCKWOOD, Head of Violin Department, Anthony J. Whitmire and Marian Struble Freeman; HANS PICK, Head of Violoncello Department; PALMER CHRISTIAN, Head of Organ Depart ment, Margaret MacGregor; OTTO J. STAHL, Head of Theory Department, Byrl Fox Bacher and Helen Snyder; JOSEPH E. MADDY, Head of Method3 Depart ment, Juva Higbie.
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY IS ORGANIZED under an act of the State of Michigan, providing for the incorporation of associations not for pecuniary profit. Its purpose is "to cultivate the public taste for music." All fees are placed at the lowest possible point compatible with sound business principles, the financial side serving but as a means to an educational and artistic end, a fact duly recognized by the Treasury Department of the United States by exempting from War-Tax, admissions to concerts given under its auspices, and by the United States Postoffice Department in admitting its publica tions to second class privileges.
THE ANN ARBOR ART ASSOCIATION invites the May Festival guests to an Exhibition of Paintings by Contemporary American Artists in the West Gallery, Alumni Memorial Hall. A selected group of Canvasses from the Thirtyninth Annual American Exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago (November, 1926) will be shown every afternoon and Thursday and Saturday mornings during May Festival Week.
THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION of the University School of Music will hold its Annual Banquet (open to Faculty, graduates and former students) at the Michigan Union, Saturday, May 21, at 12 o'clock. Tickets ($1.00) should be pro cured from Mrs. Walter F. Hunt, 1030 Baldwin Avenue (telephone 5871) before Friday noon.
CHORAL UNION SERIES--1926-1927
FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON ELEVENTH CONCERT
NO. CCCCLXV COMPLETE SERIES
Fifth May Festival Concert
Saturday Afternoon, May 21, 2:30 O'clock
SOLOIST
Ernest Hutcheson, Pianist
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock, Conductor
PROGRAM
SYMPHONY, No. 10, C Major Schubert
Andante--Allego ma non troppo; Andante con moto; Scherzo; Finale
FANTASY for ORCHESTRA, "Victory Ball" Schelling
Intermission
CONCERTO for Pianoforte and Orchestra, No. 5, E Flat Major Beethoven
Allegro; Adagio un poco moto-Rondo
Ernest Hutcheson The Piano used is a Steinway
The Final May Festival Concert will take place this evening at 8:00 o'clock sharp, on account of length of opera.
(OVHR)
NOTICES
TRAFFIC REGULATIONS.--By order of the Police Department on the occasion of the May Festival concerts, vehicles of all kinds will be prohibited on North University Avenue, between Thayer and Ingalls Streets. Taxi-cabs must park on the West side of Thayer Street, facing South, between North University Avenue and Washington Street. Persons on foot are requested to refrain from leaving from Taxi-cab entrance side of the auditorium.
SPECIAL MOTOR BUSSES.--East for Detroit and West for Jackson and intervening points will leave Auditorium immediately after all concerts.
LOST ARTICLES should be inquired for at the office of Shirley W. Smith, Secretary of the University, in University Hall, where articles found should also be left.
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY will, as usual offer two series next year as follows:
THE FORTY NINTH ANNUAL CHORAL UNION SERIES, and the NINTH ANNUAL EXTRA CONCERT SERIES.
5. THE UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC will conduct a six weeks' sum mer school beginning June 27. Instruction in practically all branches of music will be offered. The faculty includes the following:
Mrs. George B. Rhead, Maude Okkelberg, Otto J. Stahl, Nell B. Stockwell, Edith Koon, Donna Esselstyn, Piano; Theodore Harrison, James Hamilton, Nora B. Wetmore, Grace Johnson Konold, Eunice Northrup, Voice; Anthony J. Whitmire, Marian Struble-Preeman, Violin; Palmer Christian, Organ; Joseph E. Maddy, T. P. Giddings and David E. Mattern, Vocal and Instrumental Public School Methods; Otto J. Stahl, Byrl Fox Bacher and Earl V. Moore, Theory.
G. THE REGULAR SCHOOL YEAR will begin September 27. EARL V. MOORE, Musical Director; ALBERT LOCKWOOD, Head of the Piano Department; Mrs. George B. Rhead, Mrs. Maud Okkelberg, Otto J. Stahl, Nell B. Stock-well, Edith B. Koon, Martha Merkle and Donna Esselstyn; THEODORE HARRISON, Head of the Voice Department, James Hamilton, Nora Crane Hunt, Grace Johnson Konold, Nora B. Wetmore; SAMUEL P. LOCKWOOD, Head of Violin Department, Anthony J. Whitmire and Marian Struble Freeman; HANS PICK, Head of Violoncello Department; PALMER CHRISTIAN, Head of Organ Department, Margaret MacGregor; OTTO J. STAHL, Head of Theory Department, Byrl Fox Bacher and Helen Snyder; JOSEPH E. MADDY, Head of Methods Department, Juva Higbie.
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY IS ORGANIZED under an act of the State of Michigan, providing for the incorporation of associations net for pecuniary profit. Its purpose is "to cultivate the public taste for music." All fees are placed at the lowest possible point compatible with sound business principles, the financial side serving but as a means to an educational and artistic end, a fact duly recognized by the Treasury Department of the United States by exempting from War-Tax, admissions to concerts given under its auspices, and by the United States Postoffice Department in admitting its publica tions to second class privileges.
THE ANN ARBOR ART ASSOCIATION invites the May Festival guests to an Exhibition of Paintings by Contemporary American Artists in the West Gallery, Alumni Memorial Hall. A selected group of Canvasses from the Thirtyninth Annual American Exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago (November, 1926) will be shown every afternoon and Thursday and Saturday mornings during May Festival Week.
THE ALUMNI ASSOCIATION of the University School of Music will hold its Annual Banquet (open to Faculty, graduates and former students) at the Michigan Union, Saturday, May 21, at 12 o'clock. Tickets ($1.00) should be pro cured from Mrs. Walter F. Hunt, 1030 Baldwin Avenue (telephone 5871) before Friday noon.
a
cvmvcbhjk
[OFFICIAL]
Thirty-Four tf Annual
MAY FESTIVAL
University of Michigan
May 18, 19, 20, 21 1927
Hill Auditorium Ann Arbor, Michigan
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Board of Directors
EARL V. MOORE, A.M., Musicai, Director
FRANCIS W. KELSEY, Ph.D., LL.D. President
HARRY B. HUTCHINS, LL.D. - Vice-President
DURAND W. SPRINGER, B.S. Secretary
LEVI D. WINES, C.E. Treasurer
G. FRANK ALLMENDINGER, C.E. JUNIUS E. BEAL, A.B. OSCAR EBERBACH, A.B. JAMES INGLIS CLARENCE C. LITTLE, Sc.D. HORACE G. PRETTYMAN, A.B. SHIRLEY W. SMITH, A.M. ALBERT A. STANLEY, A.M., Mus.D.
CHARLES A. SINK, A.B., Secretary and Business Manager
?Deceased.
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY is organized under an Act of the State of Michigan providing for the incorporation of "Associations not for pecuniary profit." Its purpose is "to cultivate the public taste for music." All fees are placed at the lowest possible point compatible with sound business principles, the financial side serving but as a means to an educational and artistic end, a fact duly recognized by the Treasury Department of the United States by exempting from War-tax admissions to concerts given under its auspices, and by the United States Post Office Department in admitting its publications to second-class privileges.
PAGE TWO]
List of Concerts and Soloists
WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 18, 8:00 O'CLOCK
OPENING CONCERT
SOLOIST
Ernestine Schumann-Heink, Contralto
University Choral Union The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock and Howard Hanson (Guest) Conductors
THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 19, 8:00 O'CLOCK
CHORAL CONCERT
SOLOISTS
Betsy Lane Shepard, Soprano Arthur Hackett-GranvillE, Tenor
Elsie Baker, Contralto William Simmons, Bass
The University Choral Union The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock and Earl V. Moore, Conductors
FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 20, 2:30 O'CLOCK
CHILDREN'S CONCERT
SOLOIST Lea Luboshutz, Violinist
The Children's Festival Chorus, Orchestral Accompaniment Frederick Stock and Joseph E. Maddy, Conductors
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 20, 8:00 O'CLOCK
MISCELLANEOUS CONCERT
SOLOIST
Rosa PonsELLE, Soprano
The University Choral Union The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock, Felix Borowski (Guest), and Earl V. Moore, Conductors
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 21, 2:30 O'CLOCK
SYMPHONY CONCERT
SOLOIST
Ernest Hutcheson, Pianist
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock, Conductor
SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 21, 8:00 O'CLOCK
GRAND OPERA CONCERT
"CARMEN"
Bizet SOLOISTS Lois Johnston, Soprano Lawrence Tibbett, Baritone
Sophie Braslau, Contralto James Wolfe, Bass
Armand Tokatyan, Tenor The University Choral Union
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra Earl V. Moore, Conductor
[PAGE THREE
CHORAL UNION SERIES--1926-1927
Notices and Acknowledgments
All Concerts will begin on time (Eastern Standard time).
Trumpet calls from the stage will be sounded three minutes before the resumption of the program after the Intermission.
Our patrons are invited to inspect the Stearns Collection of Musical Instruments in the Foyer of the First Balcony and the adjoining room.
To study the evolution, it is only necessary to view the cases in their numerical order and remember that in the wall cases the evolution runs from right to left and from top to the bottom, while the standard cases should always be approached on the left-hand side. Descriptive Lists are attached to each case.
The Musical Director of the Festival desires to express his great obligation to Mr. Joseph E. Maddy, Supervisor of Music in the Ann Arbor Public Schools, for his valuable service as Conductor of the Children's Concert; and to the several members of his staff, for their efficient preparatory work, and to the teachers in the various schools from which the children have been drawn, for their co-operation.
The writer of the Analyses hereby expresses his deep obligation to Dr. A. A. Stanley and Mr. Felix Borowski, whose scholarly analyses, given in the Program Books of the preceding May Festivals and of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, respectively, are authoritative contributions to contemporary criticism and have been drawn upon for some of the analysis in this book.
The Ann Arbor Art Association invites the May Festival guests to an Exhibition of Paintings by Contemporary American Artists in the West Gallery, Alumni Memorial Hall. A selected group of canvasses from the Thirty-ninth Annual American Exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago (November, 1926), will be shown every afternoon and Thursday and Saturday mornings during May Festival Week.
The programs of the important concerts given during the present season under the auspices of the University Musical Society (with the exception of the May Festival Series) are given in the final pages of this publication.
PAGE FOUR]
CHORAL UNION SERIES--1926-1927
FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON SEVENTH CONCERT
NO. CCCCLXI COMPLETE SERIES
First May Festival Concert
WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 18, 8:00 O'CLOCK
SOLOIST
Mme. Ernestine Schumann-Heink, Contralto
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra The University Choral Union
Frederick Stock and Howard Hanson (Guest), Conductors
Mrs. JosEFin Hartman Vollmer, Accompanist
PROGRAM
OVERTURE in D Handel
"Erda's Warning," Act III "Rhcingold" Wagner
"Waltraute's Narrative," Act I "Gotterdammerung" Wagner
Ernestine Schumann-Heink
SYMPHONY, No. 7 in A major Beethoven
Poco sostenuto-Vivace; Allegretto; Presto; Allegro con brio.
Intermission
"Heroic Elegy" Hanson
University Choral Union (Conducted by the Composer)
SYMPHONIC POEM, "On the Moldau" Smetana
SONGS : (a) Der Wanderer Schubert
Wohin Schubert
Die Junge Nonne Schubert
Wiegenlied Brahms
Ernestine Schumann-Heink
FINALE FROM SYMPHONY No. 4 Tschaikowsky
The piano used is a Steinway
[PAGE FIVE
CHORAL UNION SERIES--1926-1927
FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON EIGHTH CONCERT
NO. CCCCLXII
Second May Festival Concert
THURSDAY EVENING, MAY 19, 8:00 O'CLOCK
SOLOISTS
Betsy Lane Shepard, Soprano,
Elsie Baker, Contralto
Arthur Hackett-Granville, Tenor
William Simmons, Bass
The University Choral Union The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Mr. Frederick Stock and Earl V. Moore, Conductors
Mr. Palmer Christian, Organist
BEETHOVEN CENTENARY PROGRAM OVERTURE, "Leonore," Op. 72, No. 3 Beethoven
QUARTET, "Mir ist so wunderbar," from "Fidelio" Beethoven
Quartet
MISSA SOLEMNIS in D, Op. 123 Beethoven
Quartet, Chorus, Organ and Orchestra
I. KYRIE
II. GLORIA
Gratias Agimus Qui Tollis Quoniam
Intermission
III. CREDO IV. SANCTUS
Osanna Et Incarnatus Benedictus
Crucifixus v.AGNUS DEI
Et Resurrexit Dona Nobis
PAGE SIX]
CHORAL UNION SERIES--1926-1927
FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON NINTH CONCERT
NO. CCCCLXIII COMPLETE SERIES
Third May Festival Concert
FRIDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 20, 2:30 O'CLOCK
SOLOISTS Lea Luboshutz, Violinist
Baeee Hill, Baritone
Elizabeth Davies, Ethel Hauser and Dalies Frantz, Pianists
Children's Festival Chorus Orchestral Accompaniment
Frederick Stock and Joseph E. Maddy, Conductors
Charles Frederick Morse, Accompanist
PROGRAM
OVERTURE, "The Secret of Susanne" Wolf Ferrari
ADAGIO and FINALE from Concerto in G Minor for Violin and Orchestra... .Bruch
Lea Luboshutz
CANTATA, "The Voyage of Arion" Moore
Barrb Hill and Children's Festival Chorus
Intermission
SUITE, "Children's Games" Bizet
March, Cradle Song; Impromptu; Duet; Galop.
SOLOS for Violin:
Praeludium et Allegro Pugnani-Kreisler
Melody Gluck
Rondo Mozart
Waltz in A major Brahms
Lea Luboshutz
SICILANO and FINALE from Concerto in D Minor for Three Pianos and Orch. Bach
.Elizabeth Davies, Ethel Hauser, Dalies Frantz
The Pianos used are Steinway
[PAGE SEVEN
CHORAL UNION SERIES-1926-1927
FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON TENTH CONCERT
NO. CCCCLXIV COMPLETE SERIES
Fourth May Festival Concert
FRIDAY EVENING, MAY 20, 8:00 O'CLOCK
SOLOIST
Rosa Ponselle, Soprano
ThS University Choral Union The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock, Felix Borowski (Guest) and Earl V. Moore, Conductors
Stuart Ross, Accompanist
PROGRAM
FANTASIE--OVERTURE, "Youth" Borowski
(Conducted by the Composer)
ARIA, "Ernani involami," from "Ernani" Verdi
Rosa Ponselle
"ODE on a Grecian Urn," from First Choral Symphony Hoist
SCHERZO--"Fancy" and "Folly's Song," from First Choral Symphony Hoist
University Choral Union (First performance in America)
ARIA, "Pace, pace, Mio Dio," from "La Forza del Destino".- Verdi
Rosa Ponselle
Intermission
SUITE, "Through the Looking Glass" Taylor
Dedication; The Garden of Live Flowers; Jabberwocky; Looking Glass Insects; The White Knight.
SONGS:-Wings of Night Watts
Eros Grieg
Lullaby Scott
Piper of Love Carew
Rosa Ponselle
"SCENES DE BALLET" Glasowwff
Preambule; Marionettes, Scherzino; Pas d'Action; Valse; Polonaise
The Piano used is a Knabe
PAGE EIGHT]
CHORAL UNION SERIES--1926-1927
FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON ELEVENTH CONCERT
NO. CCCCLXV COMPLETE SERIES
Fifth May Festival Concert
SATURDAY AFTERNOON, MAY 21, 2:30 O'CLOCK SOLOIST
Ernest Hutcheson, Pianist
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Frederick Stock, Conductor
PROGRAM
SYMPHONY, No. 10, C Major Schubert
Andante--Allego ma non troppo; Andante con moto; Scherzo; Finale
FANTASY for ORCHESTRA, "Victory Ball" SchelUng
Intermission
CONCERTO for Pianoforte and Orchestra, No. 5, E Flat Major Beethoven
Allegro; Adagio un poco raoto-Rondo
Ernest Hutchescn The Piano used is a Steinway
[PAGE NINE
CHORAL UNION SERIES--1926-1927
FORTY-EIGHTH SEASON TWELFTH CONCERT
NO. CCCCLXVI COMPLETE SERIES
Sixth May Festival Concert
SATURDAY EVENING, MAY 21, 8:00 O'CLOCK SOLOISTS
Lois Johnston, Soprano FrEdericka S. Hum,, Soprano
Jeannette van dER VepEN Reaume, Soprano
Sophie Braslau, Contralto Armand Tokatyan, Tenor
Royden Susumago, Tenor Ottis Patton, Tenor
Lawrence Tibbett, Baritone James Woue, Bass
The University Chorai, Union The Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Earl V. Moore, Conductor
"CARMEN" an Opera in Four Acts Bizet
CAST
Don Jose, Corporal of Dragoons Armand Tokatyan
Escamillo, Toreador Lawrence Tibbett
Zuniga, Captain of Dragoons )
Morales, Officer } James Wolfe
Carmen, A Gypsy Girl Sophie Braslau
Micaela, A Village Maiden Lois Johnston
Frasquita, Mercedes, Companions of Carmen
Fredericka S. Hull, Jeannette van der Vepen-Reaume
El Dancairo, El Remendado Odra Ottis Patton, Royden Susumago
Smugglers, Dragoons, Gypsies, Cigarette-girls, Street-boys, etc
¦ University Choral Union
Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Mr. Earl V. Moore, Conductor
SYNOPSIS
Prelude
ACT I A Square in Seville.
Scene and Chorus. (Micaela, Morales, Chorus.)
Chorus of Street-Boys.
Chorus of Cigarette Girls. (Carmen.)
Habanera. (Carmen.)
Scene.
Duet. (Micaela, Don Jose.)
Chorus.
Song and Melodrama. (Carmen, Don Jose, Zuniga, Chorus.)
Seguidilla and Duet. (Carmen, Don Jose.)
Finale.
ACT II Lillas Pastia's Inn.
Gypsy Song. (Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes.)
Chorus.
PAGE TEN]
Toreador Song. (Escamillo.)
Quintet. (Frasquita, Mercedes, Carmen,
El Remendado, El Dancairo.) Canzonetta. (Carmen, Don Jose.) Duet. (Carmen, Don Jose.) Finale.
Intermission Entr' Acte.
ACT III
A Wild Spot in the Mountains. Sextet and Chorus. Trio. (Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes.) MorcEau D'Ensemble. Air. (Micaela.) Duet. (Escamillo, Don Jose.) Finale. Entr' Acte.
ACT IV
A Square in Seville. March and Chorus.
Duet and Final Chorus. (Carmen, Don Jose.)
DESCRIPTIVE PROGRAMS
. BY EARL V. MOORE
COPYRIGHT
by the University Musical Society 1927
a
FIRST CONCERT
Wednesday Evening, May 18
OVERTURE in D Handel
George Frederick Handel was born February 23, 1685, at Halle; died April 14, 1759 at London.
In Handel and Bach's time an Overture as a name for a composition did not have the definite connotation it has today, either as to purpose or to structure. To be sure some of Handel's operas and oratorios were preceded by instrumental music, but the piece so played had little relation to what was to follow and was not expressed in the more perfectly molded designs which Beethoven employed in his overtures, e. g. Leonore No. 3 with which the Second Festival program opens.
The Handelian overtures display great diversity of style and variety of treatment. The influence of the French type of overture developed by Lully is frequently encountered; the overture to the Messiah is cast in this style with a grave introduction strongly chordal, followed by an Allegro movement of a fugal nature, in which the horizontal motion of the themes contrasts with the perpendicular tone relations of the introduction.
The overture with which this concert opens is an arrangement of two separate and distinct pieces by Handel, but selected and juxtaposed so as to be in keeping with the above mentioned plan. The arranger, Dr. Franz Wiillner, used for the slow, first section (Maestoso) the overture to the "Fireworks Music," a group of pieces originally written by Handel to accompany a pyrotechnical display in London in 1759 celebrating the peace of Aix-le-Chapelle. Performed in the open, only wind instruments were employed, later string parts were added to adapt the music to concert use. For the more brilliant second section (Allegro), Dr. Wiillner selected the middle section of a concerto for orchestra in D major. It is of especial interest to note that the theme of the Maestoso is also used by Handel in the first section of this and still one other concerto; thus the "arrangement" for the present program is not a welding of totally strange tonal elements. The Allegro section was originally scored for two oboes, two bassoons, four horns, organ, kettledrums and strings.
The scores of these pieces in their original form are to be found in the Complete Edition of Handel's Works, in the University Library.
[PAGE THIRTEEN
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
"ERDA'S WARNING" from "Das RhEingold" ) w
"WALTRAUTE'S NARRATIVE" from "Gotterdaemmerung" j
Ernestine Schumann-Heink
Richard Wagner was born May 22, 1813 at Leipzig; died February 13, 1883 at Venice.
Das Rheingold is the prelude to the three music dramas which deal with the life history of Siegfried, his forbears and the gods and goddesses who come under the influence of the gold that is stolen from the Rheinmaidens in the first act of Rheingold by the dwarf Alberich. In the fourth scene of this music drama, Erda appears to Wotan and urges him to give up the magic ring of gold to Fasolt and Fafner who claim it as part of their ransom of Freia. As the giants renew their demand, the scene becomes dark, and shrouded in a bluish light, Erda rises from the ground to utter this warning :
Yield it, Wotan! Yield it!
Flee the ring's dread curse!
.'Hopeless and darksome disaster lies hid in its might.
All that e'er was, know I;
How all things are, how all things will be, see I too;
The endless world's all wise one,
Erda warneth thee now.
Ere the world was, daughters three of my womb were born;
What mine eyes see, nightly the Norns ever tell thee.
But danger most dire calleth me hither today.
Hear me ! Hear me ! Hear me!
All that e'er was, endeth!
A darksome day dawns for your god-hood:
Be counselled, give up the ring!
In the third scene of the first act of Gotterddmmerung Waltraute, a Valkyrie, has come to beg her sister Briinnhilde to save Walhalla (home of the gods) and the gods from certain ruin by restoring the Rheinmaidens the magic ring. Briinnhilde now possesses the ring--a gift from Siegfried and a symbol of his devotion and constancy--but despite the threats of the destruction of Walhalla she remains adamant. Waltraute pictures Wotan, surrounded by the gods and goddesses, as he waits for the impending doom which will befall them and the world. A translation of Wagner's German text follows:
Hearken with heed to what I tell thee!
Since from thee Wotan turned him, to battle no more hath he sent us ;
Dazed with fear, bewildered we rode to the field;
PAGE FOURTEEN]
FIRST CONCERT
Walhall's heroes no more may meet War father.
Lonely to horse, without pause or rest, as Wand'rer he swept thro' the world.
Home came he at last;
In his hand holding the spearshaft's splinters;
A hero had struck it asunder.
With silent sign Walhall's heroes sent he to hew the world-ash-tree in pieces.
The sacred stem at his command was riven and raised in a heap round about the hall
of the blest.
The holy host called he together; The god in his throne took his place. In dismay and fear at his word they assembled; Around him ranged the hall was filled by his heroes So sits he, speaks no word, On high enthroned grave and mute; The shattered spearshaft fast in his grasp; Holda's apples tastes he no more. Awestruck and shrinking sit the gods in his silence. Forth on quest from Walhall sent he his ravens; If with good tidings back the messengers come, Then forever shall smiles of joy gladden the face of the god. Round his knees entwining cower we Valkyries; Nought recks he nor knows of our anguish; We are all consumed by terror and ne'er ending fear. Upon his breast, weeping, I pressed me; Then soft grew his look; he remembered Briinnhilde, thee! He closed his eyes, deeply sighing, And as in slumber spoke he the words: If e'er the river maidens win from her hand again the ring, From the curse's load released were god and world!
SYMPHONY, No. 7, A major, Op. 92 .Beethoven
Poco sostenuto-vivace; Allegretto; Presto; Allegro con brio.
Ludwig van Beethoven was born in Bonn, December 16, 1770;
died in Vienna, May 26, 1827.
The program, beginning with a characteristic "pre-classic" overture by Handel, followed by two scenes from the music dramas of Wagner brings us to one of the greatest works of Beethoven,--the "Prophet of the Symphony"--he who first displayed the utmost possibilities of the form, gave to it distinction, and pointed to future glories.
In the presence of a work like a Beethoven symphony one realizes the inadequacy of words to explain or describe all that it conveys to the soul. No composer has ever equaled Beethoven in his power of suggesting that which can never be expressed absolutely, and nowhere in his compositions do we find a work in which all the noblest attributes of an art so exalted as his
[PAGE FIFTEEN
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
more happily combine. No formal analysis, dealing with the mere details of musical construction can touch the real source of its power, nor can any interpretation of philosopher or poet state with any degree of certainty just what it was that moved the soul of the composer, though they may give us the impression the music makes on them. They may clothe in fitting words that which we all feel more or less forcibly. The philosopher, by observation of the effect of environment and conditions on man in general, may point out the probable relation of the outward circumstances of a composer's life at a certain period to his works; the poet, because he is peculiarly susceptible to the same influences as the composer, may give us a more sympathetic interpretation, but neither can ever fathom the processes by which a great genius like Beethoven gives us such a composition as the symphony we are now considering.
The Seventh fairly pulsates with free and untrammelled melody, and has an atmosphere of its own quite unlike that of the others. It was written in 1812, and was first performed on December 8, 1813, at a concert in the large hall of the University of Vienna, a fact not without significance in connection with the environment of the present occasion. Beethoven conducted in person, and the performance suffered somewhat from the fact that he could scarcely hear the music his genius had created.
"The program," says Grove, in an admirable account of this most unique and interesting occasion, "consisted of three numbers: the symphony in A, described as 'entirely new,' two marches performed by Malzel's mechanical trumpeter with full orchestral accompaniment, and a second grand instrumental composition by 'Herr von Beethoven,'--the so-called 'Battle of Vittoria' (Op. 91)."
Malzel's mechanical genius had displayed itself before this through the invention of the "Panharmonion"--an instrument of the orchestrion type-and an automatic chess-player. Three years later he constructed the first metronome, for the invention of which he has received the credit that should be given to Winkel, of Amsterdam. It will be remembered that the exquisite Allegretto schersando in Beethoven's Eighth Symphony is based on a theme from which the composer developed a canon, in compliment to Malzel.
No greater artistic incongruity can be conceived than the combination of a mechanical trumpeter, a composition like the "Battle of Vittoria," and this sublime symphony in A. The concert was arranged by Malzel, and given in aid of a fund for wounded soldiers, and on benefit concert programs, as on those of "sacred" concerts, one is never surprised at finding strange companionships.
Grove continues: "The orchestra presented an unusual appearance, many of the desks being tenanted by the most famous musicians and composers of the day. Haydn had gone to his rest; but Romberg, Spohr, Mayseder and
PAGE SIXTEEN]
jcfkbvcj
a
FIRST CONCERT
Dragnonetti were present, and played among the rank and file of the strings. Meyerbeer (of whom Beethoven complained that he always came in after the beat) and Hummel had the drums, and Moscheles, then a youth of nineteen, the cymbals. Even Beethoven's old teacher, Kapellmeister Salieri, was there, 'giving time to the chorus and salvos.' The performance, says Spohr, was 'quite masterly,' the new works were both received with enthusiasm, the slow movement of the symphony was encored, and the success of the concert extraordinary."
Haydn, Mozart, and Beethoven stand related to each other, in the evolution of the symphony, in a most interesting and logical sequence. Haydn may be compared to the first division of the sonata, in which are stated the themes, for he established its principles; Mozart, to the second division, in which the themes are developed and subjected to various treatments, for he revealed its plasticity; Beethoven, to the third, in which the themes are restated with added force and intensity for he first displayed the utmost possibilities of the form, gave to it distinction and pointed to future glories. As was natural, with the passage of the years, however, the processes developed by Haydn, and extended by Mozart, had become somewhat stereotyped. Beethoven gave freedom to the symphony by removing these traditional interpretations.
First Movement
Beethoven could not brook conventionality, and so, at the very outset, we find
that the sustained introduction--A major, common time, poco sostenuto, which in
Haydn's time was naught but a foil to the Allegro proper--is full of meaning. The
alternating themes of oboe, clarinet, and horn attract the attention immediately, and
Poco sostenuto.
no less beautiful are the episodes for woodwind. Ascending scale passages for the strings, following each other in logical sequence, lead us onward, until, after what appear to be tentative attempts at the establishment of a new rhythmical design, we are gently led into the Vivace, the first movement proper, in which gayety, naivite
and poetry so happily combine, that, following the suggestions of the music, the query
[PAGE SEVENTEEN
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
--Why not call this Beethoven's "Spring Symphony"--seems justified, in case we care to give our emotions definite direction.
The second subject--first violins and flutes, to the accompaniment of the other strings and woodwinds--so bright and cheery, and developed with the composer's keen sense of contrast and color, contributes materially to the atmosphere implied in our query.
No movement in the whole symphonic literature more thoroughly exemplifies the real spirit of the form than this, nor, incidentally, the value of conciseness.
Second Movement The Allegretto, A minor, 2-4 time,
with its vibration from major to minor; its broad melodies for the strings standing out against the constant metric pulsations, so suggestive of the Sapphic meter; the exquisite Cantabile in A major, separating the two statements of the principal subject matter, is as perennial in its charm as the "Unfinished Symphony" of Schubert. If the first movement suggests a lovely Spring landscape, this is a fleecy cloud that casts a faint shadow over the scene but neither fully conceals the sun nor hides aught of the beauty of the hills and meadows.
PAGE EIGHTEEN]
FIRST CONCERT
Third Movement
In the Scherzo--F major, 3-4 time, Presto--we step for the nonce into the Presto.
emerald shadows of the forest and witness the dance of the woodland fairies, while the trio--D major, Assai meno presto--is full of calm and quiet. Then again the fairies, Assai meno presto.
again the calm, and then, after a final repetition of the dance, the Finale.
Fourth Movement This movement--A major, 2-4 time, Allegro con brio--is full of unbridled joy.
Allegro con brio.
With an intensity of rhythm that hurries us along through the elastic and sparkling
second subject, and from climax to climax, it finally ends with a furious rush, as though Beethoven found the idiomatic speech of music, which Richard Wagner says he created, lacking in power of utterance for such elation of spirit. Again the query-Why not call this, Beethoven's "Spring Symphony"
"HEROIC ELEGY" Hanson
(First performance)
University Choral Union (Conducted by the Composer)
Howard Hanson was born October 28, 1896 at Wahoo, Nebraska.
As is well known, the entire musical world united this year in homage to one of the greatest creative artists of all time, through observance, during
[PAGE NINETEEN
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
the last week in March, of the Centenary of the death of Ludwig van Beethoven. In Vienna where Beethoven spent most of his life, practically all his major works were performed, and representatives from all nations joined in making the iooth anniversary of his death, a period of homage and eulogy.
In America, the Beethoven Centenary Anniversary Committee sought to memorialize the great composer by organizing concerts of his music throughout the country. As an American expression befitting this event, Howard Hanson was selected and commissioned to compose an Elegy for the Beethoven Celebration. The invitation of the committee to have the first performance of this work take place at this May Festival concert, was accepted, and it is opportune that the Heroic Elegy should have a place in the program scheme of this festival, in which several vocal and instrumental compositions of the Master Symphonist have a prominent place.
At the last festival Mr. Hanson's Lament for Beowulf received its first American hearing. The somber mood, the archaic flavor of harmony and the restrained, yet dramatic use of orchestral color found in Beowulf will be noted again in the Heroic Elegy. The mood, here, is major instead of minor; the chorus is used as an inarticulate instrument, (singing to the syllable of "ah") but potent in both lyric and climatic sections.
Mr. Hanson writes with a simplicity, honesty and directness all too infrequently discoverable in modem composition. His conceptions loom up like a massive bulk against a sunset sky; his line of melodic beauty is broad and sweeping; the moments of greatest intensity are luminous from the white heat of emotional expression--withal a noble, eloquent tribute to the great soul which poured itself out in the Mass in D, the Eroica and the Ninth Symphony.
SYMPHONIC POEM, "On the Moldau" Smetana
Frederick Bedrich Smetana. Born March 2, 1824, at Leitomischel; died March 12, 1884 at Prague.
"On the Moldau" is perhaps the most popular of a cycle of six symphonic poems to which the Bohemian composer gave the general title Ma. Vast (My Fatherland). In his formal description of the underlying poetical motives of this tribute to his native land, he invokes nature, history and tradition in frankly program style. He also gives us a glimpse into a sad world of his own, in which he lived during the latter years of his life, for the premonitions of deafness--which nearly drove him to madness at the time of the composition of his E minor Quartet--had been justified all too soon. The entire cycle of symphonic poems was composed after he had entered, what to a musician must have been in verity, the "Valley of the Shadow of Death."
PAGE TWENTY]
FIRST CONCERT
The question occurs whether in such a case the creative genius may not have compensations denied the interpretative artist, and absolutely unrealized by the ordinary listener For example, no one would dare say that deafness brought to Beethoven any abatement of his power! On the contrary, his imagination seemed to have carried him to greater heights. This detachment from actual sound may have its peculiar compensation in an exalted and stimulated imagination, capable of infusing the unreal with an even greater semblance of reality, than when it follows the usual course. It seems as though many of the works written under such physical restrictions contain evidences of a freedom that must have given to the creator somewhat of comfort when it brings such inspiring messages to those who listen.
Returning from this digression to our purpose, we will now give, as concisely as possible, the thoughts that inspired this charming symphonic poem:
The "Moldau," formed by the union of two small streams which issue from springs in the Bohemian forest, gives the title to the second number in this cycle. These streams, "the one warm and gushing, the other cold and tranquil"--they may be traced in two attractive and characteristic motifs--losing themselves in each other, rush on and on, joying in their strength. Passing by many a noble castle, reflecting the stars by night and happy faces by day, bearing on her bosom the fisherman's skiff, eddying through winding stretches, storming through gorges, and finally with a supreme effort conquering the Rapids of St. John, calmly and triumphantly the river now flows through the valley towards Prague. Saluting the stern and warlike old sentinel, "The Vysehrad," (the first point in the cycle) standing at the city's gate, it moves along, with an earnest purpose to "seek the sea." To do this it must pass through other scenes, cross an alien country and reach the goal only by losing itself in another and greater river.
How truthfully Smetana succeeded in depicting all this may be left to this audience, i. e., to each individual listener. In the last analysis, absolute freedom of individual interpretation--even of that which the composer has stated, in words, with more or less of definiteness--is a necessary condition of real satisfaction.
SONGS:-Der Wanderer Schubert
Wohin Schubert
Die Junge Nonne Schubert
WiEGEnlied .' Brahms
Mme. Schumann-Heink
(a) Der Wanderer--(The Wanderer)
I come here from my mountain lone,
The vale is dim,
The sea doth moan.
I wander on with pain and care,
[PAGE TWENTY-ONE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
And ever asks my sighing,
"Where" ever, "Where"
The sun to me seems here so cold,
The flow'rs are faded and life is old.
Their speech doth seem but empty sound,
I feel a stranger ev'rywhere.
Where art thou,
My beloved land
In hope, I seek, yet never know.
That land, that land where hope is green,
The land where roses bloom for me;
Where roam the friends so dear to me.
Where all my dead will live again,
That land where they my language speak,
0 land, where art thou
1 wander on with pain and care, And ever asks my sighing, "Where" ever "Where"
In spirit-voice the answer comes:
"There, where thou art not, there is thy rest!"
(b) Wohin (Whither)
I heard a blooklet plashing From out a rocky source; A-down the valley, plashing, It took its crystal course.
Its spell of pool and shadow I do not understand-The brook I needs must follow With alpenstock in hand.
And farther and farther ever I follow the foaming brook, Which, dull or silent never Its sparkling highway took.
And art thou then, my highway, That leads me--tell me where Oh, where tell me where Thou holdst me with thy plashing as in a magic snare.
PAGE TWENTY-TWO]
FIRST CONCERT
And yet why call it plashing That can no plashing be; But, rather, Water Nixies in mystic melody. Plash on, pretty friend, plash onward, and sing thy happy theme!
And you will find a mill-wheel in every
crystal stream,
Plash on, pretty friend, plash onward, And sing thy happy theme, happy theme,
Happy theme!
(c) Die Junge Nonne (The Young Nun)
Now roars thro' the tree-tops the low howling storm!
The rafters are creaking, and shivers the house!
The thunder peals loud, the red lightnings flash.
And dark is the night, and dark is the night as the grave!
Well and good, so raged once the tempest in me.
The frenzy of living waxed fierce as the storm.
My limbs were all trembling as quivers this house,
My heart flamed with love, e'en as yon lightnings flash,
And dark was my soul, and dark was my soul as the grave.
Now rage on thy way, O thou mighty storm,
My bosom is tranquil, my heart is at rest;
The Bride for the Bridegroom will patiently wait,
Her spirit is tried in cleansing fires.
She trusts to His infinite, infinite love,
I wait for Thy coming with longing full score,
O Bridegroom of Heaven, come for Thy Bride,
My spirit set free from its prison of clay.
Hark, peacefully sounds now the bell from yon tow'r. It calls to my soul in sweetest tone, To seek Heaven's eternal throne. Allelujah! Allelujah!
(d) WiEGENued (Slumber Song)
Zum, zum, the sand-man's come, All is dark; pst, baby, hark! Sand-man casts, when passing by,
Sand into each baby's eye.

Zum, zum, he's on the stairs, Baby, come and say your prayers:
[PAGE TWENTY-THREE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
"Gentle Jesus, meek and mild Listen to the prayer of a child!" Fold your hands and go to sleep, Mother, o'er thee watch will keep, While sweet angels o'er you hover, With their wings my baby cover.
FINALE from SYMPHONY No. 4, Op. 36 Tchaikowsky
Peter Iljitch Tchaikowsky was born May 7, 1840 at Wotkinsk, Russia, died November 6, 1893 at Petrograd.
The creation of the Fourth Symphony took place during the years 1877-8, and the dedication, "A mon meilleur ami" (To my best Friend) brings to mind the economic and mental conditions in which he lived during those years. The "best friend" was a widow, Nadjeda von Meek, described by Tchaikowsky's brother, Modiste, as "proud and energetic, with deep rooted principles, with the independence of a man; a woman that was pure in thought and action." Being fond of music and knowing of the composer's limited worldly resources, and his debts, in the summer of 1877 she sent him three thousand rubles and a few months later fixed upon him an annuity of six thousand rubles, that he might be able to devote himself unreservedly to composition. She wished that they never meet, but from their letters we gain an insight into a friendship of great depth.
Though the Symphony was first given as abstract music, in a letter to Mme. von Meek, the composer expresses in detail the significance of the various movements; that which relates to the Finale is appended:
If you find no reason for happiness in yourself, look at others. Go to the people. See how they can enjoy life and give themselves up entirely to festivity. A rustic holiday is depicted. Hardly have we had time to forget ourselves in other people's pleasures when indefatigable Fate reminds us once more of its presence. Others pay no heed to us. They do not spare us a glance nor stop to observe we are lonely and sad. How merry and glad they all are! All their feelings are so inconsequent, so simple. And will you still say all the world is immersed in sorrow Happiness does exist, simple and unspoilt. Be glad in other's gladness. This makes life possible."
PAGE TWENTY-FOUR]
SECOND CONCERT
Thursday Evening, May 19
OVERTURE, "Leonore," No. 3 Beethoven
Ludwig van Beethoven was born at Bonn, December 16, 1770; died at Vienna, March 26, 1827.
After writing three successive overtures to his only opera Fidelio (the first version was known as Leonore), Beethoven was still dissatisfied; although all three followed established lines of overture construction, and No. 3, especially, was considered a masterpiece. Yet he felt it to be out of the mood of the first scene of Fidelio. He realized that this particular one, massively ordered, and perfectly balanced, with the thematic material eventually evolving into vivid coda, was too sharp a contrast to the atmosphere of the simple home life depicted in the first scenes of the opera. As a result the fourth, and less brilliant overture known as Fidelio was written and the present one, No. 3, placed later in the opera as an interlude, where it is more adequately framed. It serves as a remembrance and a prophecy.
Our interest is so thoroughly aroused and our sympathies are so completely enlisted by this time, that we look forward to the opening scene of the Second Act with foreboding, yet with certainty of ultimate triumph.
The Leonore No. 3, is symphonic in its breadth, and to call it a sym-pronic poem would not be far astray, although judging from many recent examples of this much abused and long-suffering form, its coherence and lucidity might be urged against such a definition.
Beethoven did not compose with the facility for which Mozart was noted, but subjected his work to the severest criticism. Many of the themes which appear to have flown spontaneously from his pen were in reality the results of toil. Many examples might be cited of this fact, none more conclusively than the mass of rejected material one finds in the book of sketches for Leonore. This care is responsible for the fact that we have three overtures, the comparative study of which is so full of suggestion. The evolution from the first, through the second to the third, came through a change of values, that is to say, in the relative stress laid upon opposing dramatic elements, rather than in the purely musical treatment. The No. 3 is best adapted to the
[PAGE TWENTY-FIVE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
genius of the orchestra, hence more effective in performance, but we have seen that in spite of its sublimity of conception and style, Beethoven rejected it--as an introduction to the opera--for purely dramatic reasons, and moreover, reasons that could not have been as thoroughly appreciated then as now.
That one cannot hope to find much that is helpful from contemporaneous criticism is shown by the following extract from a review of the day:
"The most grotesque modulations--in truly ghastly harmony--follow one another throughout the piece; and the few trivial ideas that there are-which, however, are carefully guarded from anything like nobility, as for instance, a post-horn solo, doubtless referring to the arrival of the governor --complete the disagreeable and deafening impression."
The following non-technical analysis may be of assistance:
The introductory section---C major, 3-4 time, Adagio--opens with a unison passage, which, beginning fortissimo, sinks to a pianissimo sustained tone for strings (f sharp) while the bassoons give out a short one-measure figure, in thirds. At the ninth measure a part of Florestan's aria, "In Life's Springtime," enters. Through an interesting section for strings, responsive figures for first violins and flute, a mighty scale figure for strings (A fiat) alternating chords for string and brass and the woodwinds, and, finally, a short theme for flute and oboe which is frequently in evidence later, we are led into the Allegro--C major--Alia Breve time. A syncopated figure is the conditioning factor of its opening theme. The overture now proceeds along the structural lines of the sonata form until, after a strong unison passage, we come to the dramatic climax--the trumpet solo--mentioned above as "carefully guarded from anything like nobility." And just here occurs an example of Beethoven's masterly reserve. Berlioz would have let loose the dogs of war in the orchestra, but the greater genius gives us a simple melody, full of repose, after each statement of this stirring call, because noise illy befits such a moment. Proceeding quietly for many measures (58) before he launches his first fortissimo, he soon returns to the principal theme. In sixteen measures calm again prevails to be maintained until, in the concluding section---Presto--the strings, beginning piano, develop the wonderful passage which leads into this section where we meet the grandeur of elemental simplicity.
QUARTET from "Fidelio" "Mir ist so Wunderbar" Beethoven
Quartet
Leonora, in the disguise of a young man ("Fidelio") has obtained admission to the castle of a Spanish Nobleman and is hired into the service of Rocco, the jailor. Leonora's husband, Don Florestan has been imprisoned there by the nobleman, for political offense, and reports of Florestan's starvation and probable death have led her to attempt to be near him in his last hours. Marcelline, Rocco's attractive daughter, is beloved by Jacquino, the porter of the jail, but the sight of the youthful "Fidelio'' has given Marcelline new dreams and love longings.
The quartet on this evening's program is the third Scene of Act I, the first being a
PAGE TWENTY-SIX]
SECOND CONCERT
duet between Marcelline and Jacquino, and the second an aria for Marcelline in which she confesses her newly awakened, but unreturned love for ''Fidelio." The text of the quartet is sufficient clue to the implications of the scene, and reflects the delightfully-naive spirit which Beethoven has infused in his musical setting. The unity of mood among all the participants is intensified by the use of a well known musical device: canonic imitation, in which each voice, in turn sings the identical melody that has been sung by the preceeding voice.
For those interested in the "lay out" of this charming bit of writing, the following diagram is appended.
Mar. Theme -Counter Th. I -Counter Th. II -Free -Free
Leo. Theme -Counter Th. I -C. Th. II -Free
Jac. Theme -Free
Roc. -Theme -C. Th. I -Free
A simple orchestral accompaniment full of grace and delicacy forms the background over which are woven these themes and counter themes.
Marcelune (aside) : Mir ist so wunderbar, Es engt das Herz mir ein, Er liebt mich, es ist klar, Ich werde gliicklich sein.
Leonore (aside) :
Wie gross ist die Gefahr!
Wie schwach der Hoffnung Schein!
Sie liebt mich, es ist klar:
O namen, namenlose Pein!
Rocco (aside) : Sie liebt ihn, es ist klar, Ja Madchen, er wird dein, Ein gutes junges Paar, Sie werden gliicklich sein.
Jacquino (aside) :
Mir straubt sich schon das Haar,
Der Vater willigt ein,
Mir wird so wunderbar,
Mir fallt kein Mittel ein.
He doth to me incline, Oh bliss without alloy! He surely will be mine, My bosom beats with hope and joy!
She doth to me incline, Her hope I must destroy, No star on me will shine, Oh grief without alloy!
She doth to him incline,
I will not mar their joy,
They soon shall cease to pine,
No doubts or fears our hearts annoy.
I wish I could divine, If he doth share their joy, That she may yet be mine I'll ev'ry art employ.
MISSA SOLEMNIS in D, Op. 123 Beethoven
For Four Soix Voices, Chorus, Orchestra and Organ "Coming from the heart, may it go to the heart." Thus did Beethoven express in words (on the first page of the Kyrie) the sincerity and depth of emotion which flowed "from his heart" as he put on to paper the notes,
[PAGE TWENTY-SEVEN
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
the melody, harmony, rhythm and color which, when recreated in performance, reveal one of the greatest choral works of all time. The Missa Solemnis is kin to the Mass in B minor (Bach) and Parsifal (Wagner). It is not merely an oratorio--choral music with a sacred text; it is not merely church music--even of the first rank; its quality and its proportions preclude classification in either of these categories. It stands above and by itself; it is unique.
For more than five years, 1818-1823, Beethoven was at work upon the composition of the Mass. It was originally intended for the functions attending the installation of Archduke Rudolph as Archbishop of Olmiitz: and more specifically, it was to have had performance at the ceremony of inthronization of Beethoven's friend and pupil. Thus the element of a personal tribute to the Archbishop, as well as the composer's attitude toward the rubrics of the Catholic Church and their expression in tones enter into any discussion of the Mass. The original intentions, however, were never carried out, for the Archbishop had been in office a year when Beethoven, personally, presented him, in 1823, with a beautiful manuscript copy of the Mass (now in the Archives of the "Society of Friends of Music" in Vienna). The composer in an accompanying letter apologizes for the delay on the necessity of "corrections and other circumstances." In the latter connection it must be noted that decidedly unexpected traits of Beethoven's character and methods of bargaining with publishers for his works are brought to light in the several unfulfilled agreements the composer made for the publication of the Mass. As early as 1826 Beethoven had a plan to make the work a source of extraordinary revenue, which in itself is a laudable aim for anyone habitually in dire financial difficulties. But, as Thayer points out in his monumental biography of the composer, "at no time have his lapses from justice in the treatment of his friends and honesty in dealing with his publishers been so numerous as in his negotiations for the publication of the Missa Solemnis. He promised it to four or more publishers at the same time and gave it to none of them; he secured a loan from a friend (Brentano) in the nature of an advance on a contract which he never fulfilled; he promised the Mass to a certain publisher and then tried to create the impression that it was not the Mass but a Mass (one projected in honor of the Emperor). It is not to be inferred that the above facts are brought forward to prove the composer's lack of honesty in business dealing, but rather to show to what lengths he was forced to go in order to secure pecuniary reward sufficient unto his material needs. This was a period of ill health and total deafness, and consequently, weakened creative power; his inability to appear in concerts further limited his sources of income; he was harrassed by the cares and responsibilities of his nephew. Yet in spite of all these mundane trials he created during these very years some of the most noble and
PAGE T W ENT Y-El GHT ]
SECOND CONCERT
sublime expressions in all art; proof that his spiritual nature was rooted in sources deep and pure.
To return to the history of the Mass: The Kyrie was probably begun in 1818 shortly after the appointment of the Archduke became known; the Gloria dates from 1819 and the Credo was completely sketched by 1820; the remaining two movements were completed in "first draft" early in 1822. Simultaneously, as was his habit, Beethoven composed the Pianoforte Sonatas Op. 109. no, in, the Variations, Op. 107, No. 8 and several other small pieces. Before the Mass received its definite shape many alterations were made, both in orchestration and in proportion. One of the reasons usually advanced by Beethoven when one or more of the publishers was pressing him for the promised score was that he still had a few "corrections to make." As long as the score was in his hands it was subject to continued revision and refinement.
The publication of the Mass was postponed in order to sell by subscription, manuscript copies to the sovereigns of Europe. A formal invitation signed in Beethoven's own hand was sent out, to which ten acceptances were received. The composer modestly set the "honorarium at 50 ducats in gold" which he hoped would not be "considered excessive in view of the high cost of copying the scores." The final arrangements for the publication of the Mass together with the Ninth Symphony, which in the meantime, he had completed were not concluded with Schott and Sons of Mayence until the summer of 1824. Beethoven offered them a "New Grand Mass with soli and chorus and full orchestra" which he considered his "greatest work" for 1000 florins, a new Grand Symphony (the ninth) for 600 florins, and the yet unfinished Quartet (in E flat) for 50 ducats; but it was not until 1827 that the printed score finally appeared.
The first performance of the Mass took place in Vienna at the concert Theater besire the Karnthnerthor on May 7, 1824. On this occasion only the Kyrie, Credo and Agnus Dei were sung, under the title "Three Grand Hymns with Solo and Chorus Voices." The other numbers comprising the program were the Overture, The Consecration of the House and the Ninth Symphony. The composer was present and participated in the general direction, giving of tempi, etc. The change of title from Mass to "Grand Hymn" was necessary to obtain official sanction for the performance; the church authorities objected to the performance of missal music in the theater and until the above title was adopted the censor withheld his permission. At this concert perhaps the most pathetic figure was that of the composer, who stood by giving general directions, but scarcely hearing a single chord of the sublime music that the distinguished audience was hearing for the first time.
As we approach the hearing of this great work and as its eloquent power becomes more apparent in performance, it is obvious that here is sacred
[PAGE TWENTY-NINE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
music of the highest order. The missal text serves to kindle the imagination and the emotions of the artist: Beethoven revelled in portraying its poetical and dramatic elements. In many ways the composer shows respect for traditions, but with equal boldness he strikes out into new modes of expression, e.g. the introduction of the threatening tones of military instruments accompanying the agonized appeal of the voices in the prayer for peace (Dona nobis pacem) ; the drum's roll and the distant trumpets dramatically suggest the approach of an enemy.
Bach ¦ employed an entire movement to depict the mood of the various phrases and sections of the text in his B Minor Mass; the chorus and solo voices are entirely independent of one another; the orchestra supports the polyphony of the chorus. Beethoven's method is more symphonic; a realization in the choral field of practises developed in abstract, instrumental writing. The solo voices are integrally woven into the tonal fabric as much as are the chorus voices and instruments of the orchestra; the moods of the text are presented in a condensed, almost "paragraphic" style, yet fused together into an organic whole whose unity has variety, and whose contrasts are interrelated.
Vincent d'Indy, in his monograph on the composer, presents this penetrating analysis of the music of the Mass which may be of interest and assistance on this occasion. For convenience it will be placed under the text of the five divisions of the work.
KYRIE Kyrie eleison!
Ghriste eleison! Kyrie eleison!
KYRIE
Lord, have mercy upon us!
Christ have mercy upon us! Lord have mercy on us!
From the beginning of the Kyrie one receives an impression of grandeur which finds an equal only in that given by the similar entry in Bach's B minor Mass. It is the whole human race that implores divine clemency. The tonality is speedily inflected to the relative minor; a sort of distressful march shows us the Son of God come down to earth; but the word Christe (quartet) grounded on the same music as Kyrie, symbolizes the identity of the two Persons in one God; whereas the third Kyrie, (chorus) representing the Holy Ghost, the third Person participating in the same divinity as the two others, is based upon the third harmonic function, the subdominant, as a bond of union for the three representations of the single God.
PAGE THIRTY]
ANN ARBOR
ART ASSOCIATION
PAINTINGS FROM THE
THIRTY-NINTH ANNUAL EXHIBITION,
ART INSTITUTE OF CHICAGO
ALUMNI MEMORIAL HALL MAY 15 TO JUNE 1
1927
The Exhibition Committee, in arranging the year's schedule, reserves the month of May for the best available exhibition of American paintings. This year forty-five paintings, selected from the Thirty-Ninth Annual American Exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago, are being shown in the West Gallery, Alumni Memorial Hall. This group of paintings, since the close of the Chicago Exhibition in November, has been shown in the Minneapolis Institute of Arts, Minneapolis, Minnesota, the Grand Rapids Art Gallery, Grand Rapids, Michigan, and the Hackley Gallery of Fine Arts, Muskegon, Michigan.
(paintings
Adams, Katherine Langhorne
1. The Discarded Scarf
Albright, Ivan Le Lorraine
2. Paper Flowers
Anqarola, Anthony
3. Squatters' Lodgings
Bates, Kenneth
4. Epilogue
Baum, Walter Emerson
5. The Conversation
Bein, Charles
6. Bayou des Allemands
Beneker, Gerrit A.
7. Helen
Berninghatjs, J. Charles
8. Fishing Boat
Beeninghaus, Oscar E.
9. Autumn Days
Bernstein, Thekesa F.
10. Tatania
Borie, Adolphe
11. Woman Reading
Burroughs, Brtson
12. Demeter and Persephone
Cabrigan, William L.
13. Midsummer Masque
Carroll, John
14. Lydia
Comins, Eben F.
15. Gloria
Dalstrom, Gustap O.
16. Goose Island
de Young, Harry Anthony
17. Skulls and Bottles
Dunn, Charles
18. The Red Jacket
Eddy, Henry S.
19. Fair Street, Nantucket
Fassett, Truman E.
20. Off Shore
Fechin, Nicolai
21. The Wood Engraver
Foote, Will Howe
22. Gloucester Harbor
Fbieseke, Frederick C.
23. Nude
Grant, Frederic M.
24. Lake George
Grant, J. Jeffrey
25. A Street Scene in Brittany
Halpert, Samuel
26. The French Window
Hartman, Bertram
27. Early Spring, Sarle's Corners
Hopkinson, Charles
28. Family Group
Irvine, Wilson
29. The Broken Wall
Ives, Neil
30. Peonies
Jensen, Holger W.
31. The Green Cabin
Lever, Hayley
32. Yachts
Lie, Jonas
33. Eastward
McRae, Emma Fordyce
34. Gloucester
MOFFETT, ROSS
35. Shank Painter's Pond
Perbine, Van Deering
36. Path of Light
Philbrick, Otis
37. Winter Landscape
Schofield, W. Elmer
38. Devon Farm
Sharman, John
39. Iris
Susan, Robert
40. The Model
Walker, Horatio
41. A Barnyard Family
Walter, Martha
42. Spanish Balcony
Woelfle, Arthur, W.
43. Cape Cod Fishing Boats
Woodbtjry, C. H.
44. White Sea
Woodruff, Claude Wallace
45. Colonial House
Mayor Buys First Copy
Mayor Edward Staebler ia shown buying the first copy of The Times News In the annual newspaper sale by the Ann Arbor Kiwanis club. Judge Jay Pray, president of the club, is making the. Bale.
The mayor is handing the Judge a $B bill which the judge was quick to appropriate for the beneft of the children at Unfverslty hos pital. . -.'V
G
IT
BYSTAEB
ET ED LER
Mayor Frowns on Appropriation for Addition to Clerk Staff
POLICE FUjiF AFFECTED
Message to Council Also
Disapproves Increase
in Special Amounts
Mayor Edward VV. Staebler today vetoed three items in the 1927-28 budget adopted by city council at Its meeting Monday evening. The items disapproved by the mayor were those appropriating $1,200 for a new member of the city clerk's staff; $14,4SS additional expenditure for the police department, and an item, in the special funds appropriation for bridge, culvert and crosswalk construction.
The mayor gave the following reasons for disapproving the three items in a message to the council:
"1. The item of $1,200 for new clerk, indexing and filing, in the office of the city clerk is diapprov-ed because in my judgment the1 present force of the department of the city clerk is amply sufficient to care for the duties of that office. The present amount appropriated for salaries alone in this department is $7,200.
Police Fund Cut Urged
"2. Another item which 1 cannot ft'nd consistent with principles of economical administration is the provision for an additional expenditure of $14,488 for the police department. This sum would be used, not primarily to .afford additional protection to the city, but to reduce the hours ot service of members of the department. This amount added to the already increasing burden of taxation is, in my judgment, not justifiable either from the point of view of the needs of the department, or of the taxpayers who will eventually be called upon to assume this added burden.
¦Although I do 'not approve, of this provision, 1 do not wish to be construed as being in opposition to changes which will shorten, the hours of duty, of members of the police force. I do not question so much the need of this', redaction 'as the suddenness with -Which It is jori t.i Si-ing It aboufi¦ In_ rterday all af once P'kit that we reduce hours gradually.
"This item, therefore, of $14,-' 4S8 for seven, new first-year , men and onedesk sargeant is herewith returned disapproved.
Increase Disapproved "3. In the item of "special funds" in your budget you have appropriated the sum'of $80,22.0.86 in the bridge, culvert and crosswalk fund, which is an increase of $24,000 over
I
the appropriation of the preceding year. This increase appears disproportionate to me and I disapprove of $10,000 of the proposed increase.
"In your budget I also find an Item of $24,000 for "laying dust" on dirt streets. "While I fully recognize the fact that this service is appreciated by the residents on such thoroughfares, I respectfully call to your attentionthe fact that this sum represents the interest on over a half-million dollars at our local bond interest rates.
"While I do not disapprove the item, nevertheless, I beg to call to your attention the fact that if this sum might be made available for street paving, it vould soon obviate the necessity for such an outlay annually for purely temporary pur poses." ' S
Memory of Lioyd and Kelsey Honored When Stock
Leads Funeral March
CHORAL UNION PLEASES
Work of Group Is Distinct
Compliment to Efforts
of Earl Vr Moore
By Carl E. Gehring
Had the standard of performance set in the ,two orchestral numbers of the second May Festival concert, given Thursday evening in Hill auditorium, been maintained through to the last double bar of music heard on that occasion, the event might have been considered one of the foremost of festival concerts ever heard here. For Frederick Stock was in great form; he was inspired; utterly transported. All of which means that the Chicago Symphony, orchestra was at its best in presenting "Leonore" Overture No. 3 and the Funeral Mareh from the Third (Eroica) Symphony on this Beethoven evening.
But in the case of the Missa Sol-emnis, which followed, it was different. The work of the quartet, composed of Betsy Lane Shepard, soprano: Elsie Baker, contralto; Arthur Hackett-Granville, tenor, and William Simmons, bass, was spotty, and as this body took no
Trio of Festival Concerts Remain
Three concerts remain on this year's Festival series.
Bosa Ponselle, soprano, will appear at 8 o'clock this evening in conjunction with the University Choral union, conducted by Earl V. Moore, and the Chicago Symphony orchestra will be under the direction of Frederick Stock and Felix Borowski.
Ernest Hutcheson, pianist, will feature the concert at 2:30' Saturday "arteiTroen. Tfie tfW cago Symphony orchestra, under Mr. Stock, also will appear.
The final concert, to be given at 8 o'clock Saturday evening, will comprise a performance of Bizet's opera, "Carmen." Among the soloists will be Sophie Bras-lau, contralto, and Lawrence Tibbett, baritone. The Choral union and Chicago orchestra will be directed by Mr. Moore.
betcol r-cilirraay cajro Symphony orchestra, under Mr. Stock, also will appear, i The final concert, to be given at 8 o'clock Saturday evening, ¦will comprise a performance of Bizet's opera, "Carmen." Among the soloists will be Sophie Bras-lau, contralto, and Lawrence Tibbett, baritone. The Choral union and Chicago orchestra will be directed by Mr. Moore.
@@@@small part in Rendering the Mass, the performance was just so-so, good, but not epoch-making. "Iieonore" Well Played . It was obvious that real things were about to transpire when Mr. Stock first made his appearance on the platform. There was a glint in his eye and form in his gesture as he struck a masterful pose, lifting his baton for the initial beat of the first bar. All this promise did not go unfulfilled. Shades of the stupendous performance Mr. Stock and his men accorded the Beethoven Fifth Symphony at a festival concert two years ago, lived again in Hill auditorium when conductor and orchestra took hold of "Lenore" Overture, fairly leaped upon it for an incredibly finished and artistic rendition. .
Variations in tempo, in color and shadings were .beautifully worked out, and the overture was born anew as this gifted conductor reinterpreted it, following Beethoven's suggestions with discretion, and rather pursuing a course-of-the-moment successfully, such as only the genius, the out and out leader of musicians, can. "Lenore" Overture never was played in the manner in which it was on Thursday evening, and it never will be again. 'That is one of the secrets of the last word in conducting.
In addition to its having been Beethoven evening, commemorating the death of the composer over a century ago, the memory of Prof. Francis W. Kelsey, president of the University Musical society and professor in the University, and Alfred H. Lloyd, dean of the Graduate school in the University, was honored. Toward this end the Funeral 'March from the "Eroica" Symphony was substituted for the Quartet froih "Fidelio," which originally had been prepared for the evening. It was an appropriate choice, very, as the symphony entire was dedicated to celebrate the memory of a great man.
"To Campus Figures" The name of Napoleon Bonaparte had adorned the fly leaf of the score until the great Corsican became Emperor of France. "When that occurred, Beethoven, . with ideals of Napoleon fallen, made the change. "To the memory of a great man," Thursday evening, however, became "to the memory of great men," in thus honoring the two deceased figures of University life. The rendition, of the Funeral March was just as distinctive as that of "Lenore" Overture had been. Its climaxes were marvelous-ly wrought, and the end of the March, which may become tiresome when in less skilled hands than Stock's, was kept on a high plane.
The short wave of applause i which followed the conclusion of I this "in memoriam" performance, after the most visible and pointed gestures had indicated that it [Would not be in keeping with the . otiefinitely set off. the two 'ections f the evening, and unctuated, summarily summed up d ended the high level of things sical which had existed up to time. For with the conclusion Funeral March, the Missa .is. for quartet, chorus, or-utinued on Page Seventeen)
ELEGY'S COMPOSER AND CONTRALTO WIN FESTIVAL TRIUMPHS
(Continued from Ps:e One) sakoff or Dvorak would have been. This number was given a strong interpretation by Mr. Stock and his men, with Palmer Christian of the University School of Music, at the organ. In the Seventh Symphony by Beethoven, the next purely instrumental composition, the tempos appeared dragged and the rendition, all in all, lacked punch. The interpretation of the second movement, however, was extraordinarily beautiful and was the high point of the evening's orchestral offerings. It was in the rendition of Smetana's symphonic poem, "On the Moldau," that the undue length of the program began to tell on the audience, which apparently did not appreciate th£ magnificent color effects Mr. Stock drew forth from the brilliant and poetic work. Of the expurgated rendition of the finale from Tschaikowsky"s Fourth Symphonyr[the less said the better. Just half of the movement was played, and rather indifferently, at that.
Wednesday evening's concert was not so good and well balanced as it was genuinely interesting, and the results of the initial bow of this year's festival makes one look forward to the balance of the programs with anticipation.
Kelsey and Lloyd Will Be Honored
Tribute will be paid to the late Prof. Francis W. Kelsey and Dean Alfred H. Lloyd at the second concert this evening. In memory of these two faculty men, the program was rearranged, Beethoven's "Funeral March from Eroica Symphony" being substituted for the quartet from "Fidelio."
The following program will be presented by Betsy Lane-Shepard, soprano; Elsie Baker, contralto; Arthur Hackett-Granville, tenor, and William Simmons, bass in conjunction with the Chicago Symphony orchestra and the University Choral union: OVERTURE, "Leonore," Op. 72,
No. S Beethoven
FUNERAL MARCH FROM....
EROICA SYMPHONY.Beethoven MISSA SOLEMNIS in D, Op...
123 Beethoven
Quartet, Chorus, Organ and
Orchestra. I. KYRE II. GLORIA
Gratias Agimus Qui Tollis Quoniam
Intermission III. CREDO IV. SANCTUS
Osanna
Bt. Incarnatus Benedictus
Crudifixus
V. ANGUS DEI
Et Pesurrexit Dona Nobis
Lea Luboshutz, violinist, Barre Hill, baritone, and Elizabeth Dav-ies, EthelHauser and Dalies Frantz, pianists, are to be the soloists at the Friday afternoon concert. The Children's Festival chorus will appear in the cantata, "The Voyage of Arion." by Earl V. Moore under the direction of Joseph E. Maddy. Mr. Hill will be the soloist for this composition.
The complete program follows: OVERTURE, "The Secret of..
Susanne Wolf Ferrari
ADAGIO and FINALE from Concerto In G. Minon for violin
and Orchestra Bruch
Lea Luboshutz CANTATA, "The Vdyage of. ...
Arion'" Moore
Barre Hill and Children's Festival Chorus
Intermission
SUITE, "Children's Games" .. Bizet
March, Cradle Song; Impromptu;
Duet: Galop SOLOS for Violin:
(a) Praeludium et Allegro. .
Pugani-Kreisler
Melody Gluck
Rondo Mozart
Waltz in A major . .Brahms
Lea Luboshutz
SICILANO and FINALE from . . Concert in D Minor for Three
Pianos and Orch Bach
Elizabeth Davies, Ethel Hauser, Dalies Frantz
ELEGY'S COMPOSER AND CONTRALTO WIN FESTIVAL TRIUMPHS
Howard Hanson and Schumann-Heink Enthusiastically Applauded in Opening Concert; Beethoven Mass Scheduled Tonight
By Carl E. Gehring
Not quite up to the standard of opening concerts of May Festivals here in recent years, due to unevenness in renditions and certain awkwardnesses in the musical plan for the evening, the first performance of this, the thirty-fourth May Festival, given in Hill auditorium Wednesday evening, was a stunning affair if judged solely from its strong points; even epoch-making in at least two respects. One of these was the appearance of Mme. Ernestine Sehu-mann-Heink, contralto, on the program after an enviable career on concert and operatic platforms.
Twenty-five years ago the singer first appeared in Ann Arbor, so srhe confided to her audience in an extemporaneous talk given between the numbers of her second group. The artist further declared that she did not expect to sing here again and it was this fact which moved her thus to address her hearers. At this the audience arose and paid silent tribute, to the artisi. The second outstanding event was having
Howard Hanson, director of the Eastman conservatory at Rochester, N. Y., conduct his "Heroic Elegy," composed for the Beethoven centenary celebration this year, in its first performance.
Singer Given Ovation Schumann-Heink obviously carried off the major share of the laurels. The applause which was showered upon her, constituted an ovation as compared to that which was accorded to Frederick Stock and the Chicago Symphony orchestra. In a measure this was as it should have been. Schumann-Heink, from the standpoint of seniority and musical heritage, merited the welcome. Her interpretations and dramatic intensity left little to be desired. But some of her tones, particularly in the lower register, have deteriorated badly. Her choice of thetwo Wagnerian arias for her first group was poor, the singer's voicetiring in "Wal-traute's Narrative" from "Gotter-dammerung," after she had given "Erda's Warning" from "Das Rheingold" a magnificent rendition. Interest in the audience, too, appeared to flag. Schumann-Heink's work in her second group, composed of three songs by Schubert, "Der Wanderer," "Wohin,"' and "Die Junge Nonne," and the Brahms "Wiegenlied," again was i noteworthy, practically of the last i word, discounting certain vocal de-ficiencies and the awkwardness of i having her accompanist. Mrs. Jose-fj Hart man Vollmc", Sfl'fer ISlion. Interest in the audience, too, appeared to flag. Schumann-Heink's work in her second group, composed of three songs by Schubert, "Der Wanderer," "Wohin. and "Die Junge Nonne," and th Brahms "Wiegenlied," again was noteworthy, practically of the last word, discounting certain vocal de; ficiencies and the awkwardness of having her accompanist, Mrs. Jose-fin. Hartman Vollmy, .softer removed. Applause, it is true, Jcn.ij-' mann-Heink deserved, ..but' the huge discrepancy in, her favor, over that of Mr. Stock ana his men, was crude and unwarranted. ¦ This, unfortunately, . always seems to be the case.. Finished orchestral performances inevitably are taken for granted by festival j audiences. These bodies Seem to forget that it is an out arid out challenge to their intelligence for them to pour such extravagant applause upon the head of a single artist for a solo performance, when 70 or more artists, every one of them, perform as one gigantic muse under the baton of such a gifted director as Mr. Stock. Gertrude Stein tells us, "nothing is perplexing if there is an island," and, in this connection, cultural fly-weights hardly can be blamed for expressing appreciation when they' discover an "island" in the form of some brilliant soloist, after having become utterly lost in and baffled by a maze of abstract orchestral color. If "island" they must have at an orchestra performance. they might focus their attention upon the conductor. Apropos of applause, moreover, Schumann-Heink is to be commended for her dignified stand as to encores. Whether her voice was tired or not is entirely off the point. Local audiences apparently have yet to learn that an artist, after being recalled half a dozen times without responding does not intend to do so.
Hanson, the Composer
That Mr. Hanson, as a composer, not only is a national but a coming world figure as well, cannot be doubted after hearing his "Lament For Beowulf" at the festival last year and the "Heroic Elegy" Wednesday evening. Mr. Hanson's compositions apparently are charged with an atmosphere all their own. The sweep of the towering climaxes the rest of his Elegy appears to be suspended from and built around, takes one by storm,. There is a tremendous vigor and force In thtfi man's music, the high points op which are forged of solid stuff] quite the prototype of the bristling and pathetic climaxes which, as Paul Rosenfeld points out, have become outworn and vulgar after having been so exploited by certain late-last-century composers. Some points of Mr. Hanson's music, such as in the treatment and handling of material, share common ground with other eminent com-' posers of today, who roughly mqy bo classified as the cosmopolites. It may be the leveling influences of democracy eliminating national lines in art, that we have to deal with here, and if so, it well befits as American. But it is something to be guarded against. Preserve individuality at all costs!
Mr. Hanson also might do well to remember how Tschaikowsky conducted the opening performances of somte.of his later works and, 'lue to nervous reticence, directed ineffectually, getting these works off to a poor start. With Mr. Hanson, as a conductor, it is nervous exuberance which is open to criticism. The composer, in iiis Elegy, has treated the chorus much as did ScriabinO in some of his works, as an integral part of the orchestra; as a human instrument. The Choral Union, singing to the syllable of "ah" in this number, reflected the excellent drilling it has had, and was fully equal to the tremendous climaxes the composer has written into his score. Concert Bpjmn With
ORCHESTRA IS
IN BEST FORM;
MASS IS GIVEN
(Continued Jrom Page One) gan and orchestra, was at hand, and. as indicated before, the work of thO four singers, as a. body, was not satisfactory.
. Of the quartet, Arthur Hackett-Granville showed to the best advantage, the tenor giving a fine account of himself whenever he had the opportunity. But, written as th-e Mass is, the quartet mostly is "one and indivisible," and the work of the two women singers more ' often marred the ¦situation. Betsy Lane Shepard was fair in the, lower registers, but in the upper she actually piped. The deep bass voice of William Simmons showed off well on one occasion, in the short solo ho had in the opening bars of the fifth, movement, entitled "Agnus Dei." The work of Palmer Christian at the organ was, as it generally is, high class. He was decidedly there throughout, aiding the orchestra and chorus in some inspiring tutti passages. .
Moore Effects Improvements
Earl V.' Moore, -who wielded the baton during the Mass, is a much better musical director from the standpoint of heading the University Musical society in the capacity of drilling the Choral Union and in planning programs and general musical advancement, than he is a conductor. No doubt he is improving in the latter capacity; no less an authority than Mt. Stock so declared a year ago. But he seems to lack the vital spark which is the born conductor's from birth. It is a matter of personality.
Under Mr. Moore's tutelage, the Choral Union has been singing as it had, not been for years. This is a double compliment to the man and his untiring energy and ideals, as the Choral Union is a comparatively transient organization, each year seeing its quota of new faces appear as the older members graduate and depart. The interesting and decidedly refreshing innovations that have come to be a part of festival programs since Mr. Moore has been in charge, cannot esca.pe comment. New plans for improvement -always appear to be in the offing, and, even now, whispers of still newer compositions to be offer-ed next year, are being heard.
As was announced in "Wednesday's edition of The Times News, a manuscript sketch of the third movement, Credo, of Beethoven's Missa Solemnls is being exhibited in the lobby of University library.
Rosa Ponselle to Sing Italian Arias
Rosa Ponselle, soprano, will be the soloist at the fourth concert this evening. She will appear in conjunction with the Unievrsity Choral union and the Chicago Syphony orchestra. Frederick Stock, Felix Borowski and Earl V. Moore will be Use diractors and Stuart Ross, -accompanist.
T.i.e program wih be as follows: FANTASIE--O VBKTU RE,
"Youth" Borowski
(Conducted by the Composer) ARIA, '"Ernani involami," from
"Ernani" Verdix
Rosa Ponselle "ODE on a Grecian Urn,'' from
First Choral Symphony . .Hoist SCHERZO--"Fancy" and "Folly's
Song," f rom First. Choral
Symphony . . . . . . Hoist
University Choral Union (First performance in America) ARIA, "Peace, peace, Mio Dio," .from "La Forza del Destino"
Verdi
Rosa Ponselle Intermission SUITE, "Through the Looking
Glass" Taylor
Dedication; The Garden of Live Flowers; Jabberwocwy;
Looking Glass Insects; The
White Knight. SONGS:-(a) "Wings of Night .... Watts
(¦b) Eros Greig
Lullaby Scott
Piper of Love Carew
Rosa Ponselle .... "SCENES DE BALLET"
Glazounpff
Preambule; Marionettes, Scherzino; Pas d'Action; "Valse; Polonaise.
Saturday's matinee will feature the Chicago , orchestra under Frederick Stock. The following SYMPHONY, No. 10, C Major
Schubert
Andante '-Allego ma non troppo; Andante con moto; Scherzo; Finale
FANTASY for 'ORCHESTRA, "Victoria Ball' ....... Schelling
Intermission
CONCERTO for Pianforte and Orchestra, No. 5, E. Flat Major
Beet'-.oiven
Allegro; Adagio an poco moto-Rondo.
Ernest Hntcheon
brass choir which went shivering through one like pieces of steel. It was a great performance of marvelous music, one which the composer should have taken pride in hearing.
Luboshutz Triumphs in Afternoon Concert
Honors at the third May Festival concert of Frida" afternoon easily were taken by Lea Luboshutz, Russian violinist. Displaying a flexible technique practically developed lo perfection, andendowed with a wealth of native musical feeling, the artist triumphed in Hill auditorium in her appearance as soloist with the Chicago Symphony orchestra under the baton of Frederick Stock, in a performance o£ the G Minor Violin Concerto by Bruch. The composition, a great favorite with violinists due to the gratifying way it is put together, found Miss Luboshutz at vase in manipulating its pronounced difficulties, and drawing forth rich tones and graceful melodic curves which won her spontaneous responses from her audience. The violinist plays in good taste. The quiet sentimentality of the Adagio, for example, had enough sound ir,en-tality and poise infused, to lend it a dignity one might not have suspected it of having.
Miss XiUboshutz, in her second appearance, played a group of four violin pieces accompanied by Mabel Ross Khead of University School of Music. These comprised "Praeludium et Allegro" by Pugnani-Kreisler; "Melody" by Gluek; "Rondo" iby Mozart, and a 'Waltz in A Major" by Brahms. The brilliant manner with which the intricacies of the first-named was despatched, contrasted sharply with the second, taken from the trio of the Dance of the Blessed Spirits from "Orpheus'" by Gluck. Here Miss Luboshutz drew forth a silvery melodic thread from the muted strings. Two encores were necessary to appease the house, these being ''Frasquita" by Kreisler, and Pold-ini's "Dancing Doll," in a clever arrangement by Kreisler, where the waltz theme is doubled up between piano and violin in an effective counter plan.
A Three-Piano Rendition
Dalies Frantz, Elizabeth Davies and Ethel Hauser, advanced pupils of Guy Maier of the school of music faculty, rendered the Sicilano and Finale from the Concerto in D Minor For Three Pianos and Orchestra by Bach, with the Chicago orchestra under Mr. Stock, in a strongand masterful way. The ensemble of the trio was good and their inlividual performances were excellent. The dash which they infused into their work, reflectingthe hand of their teacher, caught the audience at once and brought the three pianists a well merited burst of applause.
Karl V. Moore's cantata, "The Voyage of Arlon," performed by Barre Hill, baritone, and the Children's Festival chorus with the Chicago orchestra, under the direction of Joseph EMaddy, was heard here for the first time'with the instrumental portion in orchestral raimant. It will be remembered that at the first performance of the cantata here in 1921, Albert A. Stanley voiced the hope that the piece soon could be heard with an orchestral background. That the point was well taken was proved Fridav afternoon when Mr. Moore's fanciful work was given a delightful rendition. The spirit of the pretty rhythms and swinging airs the director accentuated well. Mr. Hill's deep baritone voice offered more dramatic utterances, by way of contrast, witit a surety which is characteristic of this man's work.
Purely orchestral musie which was heard on this occasion, comprised the "Secret of Suzanne" Overture by Wtolf-Ferrari, which selection opene the concert, and Bizet's ravishinsrlv
SOPRANO WINS
APPROBATION
OF AUDIENCE
(Continued from Pagre One) the field of rnusieal composition. It was conducted with the surety of the major artist and was roundly applauded. Of particular interest because of the success which attended the first performances of his opera, "The King's Henchman," this year at the Metropolitan Opera house of New York, was Deems Taylor's "Through the Looking Glass" Suite, conducted by Mr. Stock. Here was music of a modern but not extreme stamp, a work which justly has a place on the repertoire of leading orchestras in this country. The fourth movement. "Looking Glass Insects," was made effective by a tremolo effect in the flute, brought about by the flutist's trilling his tongue. Equally well done was the sad passing of Jab-berwocky, (third .movement) whose death is expressed by the slow and grotesque descent of the contra-basson into the lowest depths of orchestral range. In this connection, Ann Arbooihas been fortunate this spring in the number of works by living composers it has been able to hear. Of these moderns there have been such Americans as Hanson, Borowski, Schelling, Moore, Watts and Taylor, not to mention the tremendous English figure, Gustav Hoist.
Hoist is Significant From the standpoint of composition, the appearance again this year of the name of Hoist on the festival program, has carried the most color and meaning, not because he is a greater figure than any of the above-mentioned, but because he is far and away the most revolutionary of the group, the greatest pioneer. The old canons of judging a, composer and auging his skill do not apply here. Hoist is hewing out new paths for himself and is no respecter of difficulties in performing his music. LikeBloch, although for reasons other than heritage, he is a spokesman of the Near East in his scores. His history as a composer has been one of steady development, the conservatism of some of his earlier work when compared to the later, being startling. The flavor of Hoist, moreover, cannot be said to be English in the sense that some of Elgar is, but rather like Hanson's music, it bears the cosmopolitan imprint.
It was in the two ' movements from Hoist's Choral Symphony, played for the first time in this country, that Mr. Moore and the Choral Union showed their mettle. At no time did there appear to be any hitch in performance, Mr. Moore's understanding of its harmonic labyrinth and tricky rhythms being thorough. With great effect he drew forth the deeper orchestral intonations of the "Ode on a Grecian Urn," exercising a tremendous restraint. Therein lies the power of the movement. With pent up feeling finally unleashed in trie scherzo, "Fancy" and "Folly's Song," there occurred some clashes of harmony in the
or
rhythms and swinging airs the director accentuated well. Mr. Hill's deep baritone voice ottered more dramatic utterances, by way of contrast, with a surety which ia characteristic of this man's work.
Purely orchestral music which was heard on this occasion, comprised the "Secret of Suzanne" Overture by Wtolf-Ferrari, which selection opened the concert, and Bizet's ravishlngly delightful 'Children's Games" Suite. This concert was another fine example of the well-balanced type of program which has been a factor in May Festivals of recent years.
'Carmen' Will Be Presented Tonight
Bizet's opera, "Carmen," will be resented at the final concert this vening. Among the soloists will ie Sophie Braslau, contralto, and awrence Tibbett, baritone. The hicago Symphony orchestra and lie University Choral union will e directed by Earl V. Moore.
The complete cast and program ollows: 'CABMEN" an Opera In Four
Acts Bizet
CAST
Don Jose, Corporal of Dragoons Armand Takatyan Bscamillo, Toreador.
Lawrence Tlbbetr
unlga, Captain of Dragoons. .
,'Iorales, Officer
James Wolfe Jarmeb, A Gypsy Girl
Sophie Braslau Micaela, A Village Maiden
Louis Johnston!
'rasquita, Mercedes, Companions
of Carmen Fredericka S.
Hall, Jeann-ette van der Vepen-Reaume.
;i Dancairo, El Remendado Odra Ottis Patton, Royden Sua-umago.
mugglers, Dragoons, Gypsies, Cigarette-girls,'' Street-boys, etc.
University Choral Union
Chicago Symphony Orchestra Mr. Earl V. Moore, Conductor
SYNOPSIS PRELUDE
ACT 1
A Square In Seville SCENE AND CHORUS (Micaela, Morales, Chorus.) HORUS OF STREET BOYS. HORUS OF CIGARETTE GIRLS
(Carmen.) HABANERA, (Carmen.) SCENE.
DUET, (Micaela, Don Jose.) CHORUS.
SONG AND MELODRAMA, (Carmen, Don Jose, Zuniga, Chorus) SEGUIDILLA AND DUET, (Carmen, Don Jose.) Finale.
ACT II
Lillas Pastia's Inn GYPSY SONG (Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes.) CHORUS.
TOREADOR, (Escanillo.) QUINTET, (Frasquita, Mercedes, Carmen, El Remendado, El Dancairo.) CANZO'NETTA, (Carmen, Son
'Jose.)
DUET, (Carmen, Don Jose.) FINALE.
Intermission Entr' Acte.
ACT III
A "Wild Spot in the Mountains SEXTET AND CHORUS. TRIO, (Carmen, Frasquita, Mercedes.)
MOR'CEATJ D-ENSEMBLB. .
AIR (Micaela.)
DUET, (Escamillo, Don Jose.) FINALE. a Entr" Acte,
SECOND CONCERT II
GLORIA Gloria in excelsis Deo, et in terra pax
hominibus bonae voluntatis. Laudamus te, benedicimus te,
adoramus te, glorificamus te. Gratias agimus tibi propter magnam
gloriam tuam.
Domine Deus, Rex coelestis! Deus Pater omnipotens! Domine, Fili unigenite, Jesu Christe!
Domine Deus ! Agnus Dei! Filius Patris! Qui tollis peccata mundi!
miserere nobis;
suscipe deprecationem nostram. Qui sedes ad dexteram Patris,
miserere nobis.
Quoniam tu solus sanctus,
tu solus Dominus, tu solus altissimus,
Jesu Christe! cum Sancto Spiritu in gloria Dei Patris.
Amen.
GLORIA Glory be to God on high, and peace on
earth to men of good will. We praise Thee, we bless Thee, We adore Thee, we glorify Thee. We give Thee thanks for Thy great glory.
O Lord God, O heavenly King!
O God, the Father, Almighty!
O Lord Jesus Christ, the only-begotten
Son! O Lord God! Lamb of God! Son of the
Father! O Thou, who takest away the sins of the
world!
have mercy upon us; receive our prayer. O Thou, who sittest at the right hand of
the Father! have mercy upon us. For Thou alone art holy,
Thou alone art Lord, Thou alone art most high, O Jesus Christ!
together with the Holy Ghost, in the glory
of God the Father.
Amen.
The Gloria enters with impressive brilliancy in a trumpet fanfare confided first to the contraltos, then to the tenors of the chorus. After the shout of glory, all suddenly grows calm on the words pax hominibus, etc., and one can already trace the sketch in its essential features, of the grand theme of Peace with which the work ends. We cannot dwell on each phrase of the Gloria; but we shall mention, in passing, in the Gratias agimus tibi, the emergence of a melodic design later to be cherished by Richard Wagner, principally in the Meistersinger and the Walkurc. The trumpet-signal which serves as a pivot for the whole piece, is almost constantly in evidence; every time, at least that the words imply an appeal to force or a symbol of power.
Ill
CREDO
Credo in unum Deum, patrem omnipotentem, factorem coeli et terrae visibilium omnium et invisibilium.
Credo in unum Dominum Jesum Christum,
CREDO I believe in one God,
the Father Almighty,
maker of heaven and earth, of all things visible and invisible. I believe in one Lord Jesus Christ, the
[PAGE THIRTY-ONE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
Filium Dei unigenitum;
et ex Patre natum ante omnia saecula.
Deum de Deo, Lumen de Lumine;
Deum verum de Deo vero;
Genitum; non factum; consubstantialem
Patri,
per quern omnia facta sunt; Qui propter nos homines, et propter
nostram salutem, descendit de coelis, et incarnatus est de Spiritu Sancto ex
Maria Virgine, et homo factus est. Crucifixus etiam pro nobis;
sub Pontio Pilato passus et sepultus est,
Et resurrexit tertia die,
secundum Scripturas. Et ascendit in coelum, sedet ad dexteram
Patris. Et iterum venturus est cum gloria,
judicare vivos et mortuos;
cujus regni non erit finis. Credo in Spiritum Sanctum,
Dominum et vivificantem, qui ex Patre Filioque procedit;
qui cum Patre et Filio simul
adoratur et conglorificatur;
qui locutus est per prophetas. Credo in unam sanctam Catholicam et
Apostolicam Ecclesiam. Confiteor unum Baptisma in remissionem
peccatorum. Et expecto resurrectionem mortuorum, et
vitam venturi saeculo. Amen.
only-begotten Son of God;
and born of the Father before all ages.
God of Gods, Light of Light,
true God of true God;
begotten, not made; consubstantial to the
Father,
by Whom all things were made;
Who for us men and for our salvation,
came down from heaven,
and became incarnate by the Holy Ghost
of the Virgin Mary, and was made man.
He was crucified also for us;
suffered under Pontius Pilate and was
buried,
And the third day He arose again according to the Scriptures.
And ascended into heaven, and sitteth at
the right hand of the Father.
And He is to come again, with glory,
to judge both the living and the dead;
of whose kingdom there shall be no end.
I believe in the Holy Ghost, the Lord and Giver of life,
Who proceedeth from the Father and the Son;
Who, together with the Father and the Son, is adored and glorified;
Who spoke by the prophets.
I believe in one holy Catholic and Apostolic Church.
I confess one baptism for the remission of sins.
And I expect the resurrection of the dead, and the life of the world to come.
Amen.
With the Credo, we enter the cathedral. And what is this Credo, even plastically considered, but a real cathedral divided into three naves, the central nave ending with the sacrificial altar "Et homo factus est" The architectural arrangement is a marvel of construction, a miracle of harmonious, nay, mystical equilibrium. Judge for yourselves.
The Credo is planned in three grand divisions, following the trinitarian system customary in a great number of liturgical works.
PAGE THIRTY-TWO]
SECOND CONCERT
The first division, an exposition of faith in one God, in itself comprises two affirmations : " believe in one God, the Father Almighty," and "in one Lord Jesus Christ." Both are established in the principal key of B flat major with a transition to the subdomi-nant; after which the two Persons are reunited, on consubstantialem Patri, in the tonic
The second division presents the Evangelical drama of Jesus descended to earth. It consists of three acts; The Incarnation, going over to the tonality of D major (which is that of the synthesis of the Mass) on the words Et homo foetus est; the scene of the Passion Crucifixus beginning in D major and progressing in depression on the words of the burial; and the Resurrection, which of a sudden soars upward to the luminous dominant, F major.
The third division is consecrated to the Holy Ghost. Like the first it contains two subdivisions: The affirmation of belief with regard to the Holy Ghost and the dogmas of the church; and the celebration of the mystery of eternal life. All this last part does not leave the tonality of the piece.
IV
SANCTUS
Sanctus Dominus Deus Sabaoth. Pleni sunt coeli et terra gloria tua. Osanna in excelsis!
Praeludium--Orchestra Benedictus qui venit nomine
Domini! Osanna in excelsis!
SANCTUS
Holy is the Lord God Sabaoth. Heaven and earth are full of Thy Glory. Hosanna in the highest!
PREi-ura;--Orchestra Blessed is he who cometh in the name of
the Lord! Hosanna in the highest!
In the Sanctus, Beethoven, respecting the Catholic liturgy and knowing that, during the mystery of the consecration, no voice should make itself heard, by the might of his genius, has raised silence into sublimity. This Praeludium, (orchestra) which allows the celebrant time to consecrate the elements is to our mind an inspiration infinitely loftier in conception than the charming concerto for violin and voice which follows. This Praeludium is admirable in every aspect! What grandeur of religious art! and obtained by means so simple as to be astonishing, did not enthusiasm in this case overwhelm astonishment.
AGNUS DEI Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi,
miserere nobis, dona nobis pacem.
AGNUS DEI O Lamb of God, that takest away the
sins of the world, have mercy upon us grant us peace.
We have now reached the Agnus Dei, that division of the work which we should consider the finest, and the most eloquent of genius, had not the Credo preceded it.
It is here, and in the prelude for the consecration, that Beethoven's religious feeling is most clearly in evidence. The whole long entrance-section, wherein mankind implores the pity of the divine Lamb, is of a beauty still unequalled in musical history. The accents of this appeal rise brokenly toward the throne of the Lamb, the victim of Hate:
[PAGE THIRTY-THREE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
it beseeches Him for peace, "peace within and without," wrote Beethoven; the theme of Peace emerges, calm and luminous, out of the irresolute key of B minor and gives us back the tonality of D major, that of Faith and Love, that key wherein the love of all Mankind is enwreathed in the Ninth Symphony. This theme takes on a pastoral character which gives the impression of a walk in the fields; for Peace is not in the city.
Suddenly, after a fugal exposition of the theme of peace, distant drums and trumpets twice announce the army of Hate. The soul is anew seized with dread; it begs for promised peace. "We must pray," wrote Beethoven in his sketches. The theme of peace is transformed, the conflict in the human heart is introduced in the orchestral Presto in which the peace-motive turns upon itself in a self-annihilating struggle brought to a close by a victorious fanfare.
This mood gives way again to the theme of Peace. While far away drums are beating the retreat of the spirits of evil, there spreads for the last time from the height of its upraised stem the brilliant bloom of the four incomparable measures, as if to exhale heavenward the perfume of the grateful soul's act of faith.
PAGE THIRTY-FOUR]
THIRD CONCERT
Friday Afternoon, May 20
OVERTURE, "The Secret of Susanne" Wolf-Ferrari
Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari was born January 12, 1876, at Venice.
The Secret of Susanne is designated an intermezzo in one act, and has only two singing characters, the third character being a dumb servant. Its first performance in America, by the Chicago Opera Co. at Philadelphia, fell on March 29, 1911. Since then its popularity has been sustained largely by its melodic appeal.
The sparkling overture, which opens in the key of D major, 2-4 time, Vivacissimo, is simple and logical in design, but does not err on the side of subserviency to the stereotyped formal traditions.
CONCERTO for Viown, No. 1, in G Minor, Op. 26 Bruch
Adagio ; Aiaegro Energico
Lea Luboshutz Max Bruch was born January 6, 1838, at Cologne; died October 3, 1920, at Berlin.
Bruch wrote in all, four concertos for the violin, the first of which was written in 1865 and 1866 from sketches made in 1857. The first perform ance was at a concert in Mannheim with the composer conducting and the solo part being played by Konigslow, a violin teacher in the Cologne Con servatory, who, on short notice, took the place of the concert master of the Mannheim Orchestra who had prepared the work. Following the concert, the work was thoroughly revised and submitted to Joachim who suggested still further alterations. Anent the latter's note that perhaps, because of the freedom in the construction of the opening movement, it might better be styled a "fantasie" than a "concerto," Bruch wrote: "I find that the title 'concerto' is fully justified; for a 'fantasie,' the last two movements are too completely and symmetrically developed. The different sections are brought together in beautiful relationship, and yet--and this is the principal thing-there is sufficient contrast. Spohr, moreover, called his 'Gesangscene' a 'concerto'." Bruch made a number of changes in the work, and in the re vised form it was brought out for the first time by Joachim at Bremen in 1868. .
[PAGE THIRTY-FIVE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
Of the three movements (the first; is omitted in this interpretation), the greatest is the Adagio, the melody of which has that poise and character which makes it one of the finest conceptions of the nineteenth century; as the slow movement of a symphony or concerto is the test of the composer, this work needs no further analysis or commendation other than to state that the first movement is a preparation for the adagio which follows without pause, and that the third movement is a typical finale; the thematic material is a Spanish dance rhythm contrasted with a second theme that is more expressive in character. Attention is directed to the canonic treatment of this theme on its second entrance.
CANTATA--"The Voyage of Arion" Moore
Barre Hill and Children's Festival Chorus
Earl Vincent Moore was born September 27th, 1890, at Lansing.
"The Voyage of Arion" was written in 1920-21, dedicated to Dr. Albert A. Stanley and received its first performance under the baton of George Oscar Bowen at the twenty-eighth May Festival. The work has been performed frequently, and a new orchestra score was prepared a few months ago for the performance in Orchestra Hall, Chicago (April 24-27) and will be used in this performance as well.
For the inspiring and poetical text the composer is indebted to Dr. Marion C. Wier, formerly a member of the faculty of the University of Michigan, but now Professor of English and Rhetoric at Brown University.
The argument of "The Voyage of Arion" runs as follows: Arion, after having become famous in Greece as a poet, wandered to Italy and Sicily, where through his art he amassed great wealth. Once he had occasion to go from Tarentum to Corinth. When on the sea the sailors conspired to kill him and seize his wealth. The poet, aware of his fate, asked permission to sing for the last time; so, singing his death song, he leapt into the sea. The ship sailed on to Corinth, and later the sailors were confronted by Arion, who had been miraculously preserved by Poseidon. The crew was glad to restore the plunder and escape by putting out again to sea.
I--TO SEA
Sailors making ready to put to sea.
Crew.--Hippi, Anax, Poseidon, ho!
Feather the oars and breast them, so!
Sheet home sails for the winds to blow,
Hark to the wide sea calling! All things change to the roll of the years, The frost of winter, the warm spring tears, The mellow summer that autumn cheers For the vine leaf sere and falling.
PAGE THIRTY-SIX]
THIRD CONCERT
Hippi, Anax, Poseidon, ho !
Over the broad blue rollers go,
Where the foam of the Ocean steeds like snow
In the face of the wind is flying; All things change, so enough of ease, Breast the oar, trim sail to the breeze, Thrice welcome the roll of the wine-dark seas,
And the wild sea voices crying.
II--PRAISE TO ARION Arion comes out on deck. Passengers gather about him to do him honor.
Passengers.--Come, set a chaplet on his hair,
And nectar pour to gladden lips
Where honey of the muses drips
In song the wind blows everywhere.
Companion of our journeying,
The Lord of melody and song,
Great Helios will the day prolong If once again for us thou sing.
Thy songs we find in Athens fair,
All fragrant with her violets,
And who culls them e'er forgets Arion's fingers set them there
And as they watch the moon arise
Across the hills and sail-flecked sea,
Fair maidens hum thy melody, And each one thinks of thee and sighs.
Ill--RIDICULE OF ARION
The sailors attracted by Arion's wealth, revile him and threaten violence.
CREW.--There are many strange things in this world of ours,
On the fruitful land and the wine-dark sea, But the strangest is this, a poet with powers To win him wealth through minstrelsy.
The blind old bard of the sea-girt isle,
Who talked with the gods over windy Troy, Felt never the warmth of Ploutus' smile
To gladden his heart with its golden joy.
[PAGE THIRTY-SEVEN
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
But lo, this swaggering, blear-eyed swine, He swaggers aboard with his jars of gold,
And gloats o'er the men and the maids who twine His lyre with bay, like a god of old.
Sing ho, yo-ho, let his wealth be ours: A bold imposter, no bard is he;
We'll save his gold for our leisure hours, And him we'll send to the gods of the sea.
IV--SCENE
Arion asks permission to sing before he dies.
Arion.--A boon, good sailors, a boon I crave,
Give heed to my ultimate cry; E'er I plunge to the weltering wave Aglare 'neath a pitiless sky,
I would lift my voice to the Aether wide That leaps to the rim of the ocean tide, And chant the beauties of vale and hill And praise the demons of hill and vale.
Sailors.--Go on, why linger Go on and sing,
And twang away on your thin-voiced lyre; And puff away till your bellows tire.
V--FAREWELL
Arion.--O Lord of light that warms the day
And paints the earth and ocean fold,
O Lord of song whose magic sway Makes glad the young and cheers the old,
Lend to my aid, O king, I pray, Thy silver bow and harp of gold.
The valleys careen
'Neath the crest of the hills; O'er their curves gold and green
Leap the silver-white rills, And the heaven is vibrant with rapture
That deep to the earth bosom thrills.
Now I feel on my lips
The god-kindled fire, As I strike with the tips
Of my fingers the lyre And never a blossom of song will be sered
By the flame of my pyre.
PAGE THIRTY-EIGHT]
THIRD CONCERT
Poseidon, warder of the world,
And shaker of the land and sea, Behold me to thy ocean hurled, Blameless, and have thou pity on me.
VI--HOMING SONG (Arion is thrown overboard and the sailors prepare for the end of the voyage.)
Crew.--Merry men, up, hold hard the oar,
Weather her head to the breaker's roar; Home! and the stress of the sea is o'er,
Shoreward the gale is singing. Mottled shadows along the hills Sway to the splash of tremulous rills, Where Bacchus the tufted wineskin fills,
And the Maenad shout is singing.
(Arion miraculously appears.)
Arion.--Halt! Stand fast, ye men of the sea!
Restore me the treasure ye wrested from me.
Lo, I am he you forced to leap
Into the ocean's hungry deep.
But gods still hear the righteous cry;
So here before you, lo, am I!
Crew.--Yes, we have sinned; Hope led in vain To fill our purse with others' gain. And e'er we could our clearance get, Had caught us in her clinging net. Come, fair singer, here's thy gold for thee; Come and take it all, and set us free.
VII--OUTWARD BOUND (Sailors make ready to sail away)
Crew.--Steady! give way, give way, ye crew! Seaward we point the prow anew. Many a league we shall furrow through,
And the evening shadows falling.
All things change, so enough of ease;
Breast the oar, trim sail to the breeze,
Thrice welcome the roll of the wine-dark sea.
Hark to the wild waves calling!
--Marion C. Wier.
[PAGE THIRTY-NINE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
SUITE, "Children's Games' Op. 12 Bizet
Georges Bizet was born at Paris, October 25, 1838; died at Bougival, June 3, 1875. March ("Trumpeter and Drummer")--Allegretto moderate Cradle Song ("The Doll")--Andantino quasi Andante. Impromtu ("The Top")--Allegro vivo. Duet ("Little Husband, Little Wife")--Andantino. Galop ("The Ball")--Presto.
This work, by one of the composers, who are represented by more pretentious works in this same series of concerts, illustrating as it does episodes in child life, calls to mind the fact that many of the classical and modern writers have not considered it beneath their dignity to appeal to youthful imaginations. Haydn in his "Kinder Sinfonie," Schumann in his "Jugend Album," Mendelssohn in his "Kinder-scenen," made this appeal, while Humperdink found inspiration for his greatest work in a children's classic. The composition on this afternoon's program has found a place in the repertoire of the great symphonic organizations largely because it happily illustrates a peculiar daintiness and naivete characteristic of the treatment of the orchestra by French composers.
SOLOS For Violin :_
Praeludium et Allegro Pugnani-Kreisler
Melody Gluck
Rondo Mozart
Waltz in A Major Brahms
Lea Luboshutz
Siciliano and Finale from Concerto in D for Three Pianos
and Orchestra Bach
Johann Sebastian Bach was born March 21, 1685, at Eisenach; died July 28, 1750, at Leipzig.
Misses Elizabeth Davies, Ethel Hauser and Mr. Dalies Frantz. ¦
There is a tradition, which Spitta, who was an authority on the life and works of the master, believes is based on fact, to the effect that Bach wrote the two concertos for three claviers (the present in D minor and its companion in C major) in order to play them with his two eldest sons. If this be true, the concerto played this afternoon must have been written about 1730-33It will be noted that the orchestral portion of the concerto employs only the string family and that the material allotted to the pianos differs materially from that usually expected in a concerto for this instrument. There is an absence of virtuoso passages as such. Bach had in mind the ensemble of three pianos and strings, rather than the display of any single performer or instrumental color at the expense of the whole.
PAGE FORTY]
FOURTH CONCERT
Friday Evening, May 20
FANTASIE--OVERTURE, "Youth" Borowski
(Conducted by the composer) Felix Borowski was born at Burton, England, March 10, 1872.
Although this is the first composition from the pen of Mr. Borowski to be heard in these concerts, his position as a creative artist, as well as a distinguished musicologist, and critic, in the Central West has been established for many years. He has written suites, ballets and many symphonic poems for orchestra, concertos for piano, organ and orchestra, together with many smaller compositions for various instruments. For many years Mr. Borowski was the President of The Chicago Musical College and served as music critic for several leading Chicago daily papers. His erudite and informative notes appearing in the program books of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra are well known among concert goers and musical scholars.
In response to a request the composer of "Youth" contributed the following :
"This work, completed in August, 1922, was performed for the first time at the closing concert of the Chicago North Shore Festival Association, Evanston, 111., May 30, 1923. One of five compositions selected by the judges--George W. Chadwick, Henry Hadley and Gustav Strube--from some forty-seven submitted in the competition for a prize of $1,000 offered by the Festival Association, "Youth" and the four other competing works were interpreted at a public rehearsal, conducted by Mr. Frederick Stock, held in the Northwestern Gymnasium, Evanston, May 26. On that occasion the prize was awarded by the judges to the work which is performed at this concert.
"There is no 'program' connected with the work which is being performed on this occasion, beyond that which is imported by its title. The score is dedicated by the composed to his wife, Elsa, who, indeed, was responsible for its creation.
"The principal theme (Allegro brillante, A major, 2-2 time) is preceded by introductory material, the theme itself appearing at the twentieth measure in the violins accompanied by the iterated notes of the woodwind and horns. This material is worked over at some length and eventually is succeeded by a second subject (Andante non troppo) given out by a flute over quiet harmonies in the strings. This subject is taken
[PAGE FORTY-ONE
OFFICIAL, PROGRAM
up by all the strings (double basses excepted) and is worked up to a sonorous climax. There is a sudden subsidence of excitement and a solo violin gives out the second theme, this dying away in a long-held pianissimo. The original tempo and the figure which had begun the piece return, a new idea soon being passionately urged forward by the violins in octaves. This episodical matter is worked over tempestuously and leads finally to a resumption of the principal theme. The second subject which earlier had been heard in the flute, is now sung by an aboe. As before it is taken up by the strings. The time is hastened and a passage over an organ-point on E in the kettledrum and lower strings, finally losing itself in the lowest notes of the double basses, is merged into a short and somewhat somber section for the strings ending in a pause in the bassoons and brass. Suddenly the opening measures of the piece return in the violins, leading to the coda, which is based upon the principal theme."
ARIA, "Ernani invoIvAmi' from "Ernani" Verdi
Miss Rosa Fonseu-E
Guiseppe Verdi was born at Roncole, Italy, October o, 1813; died at Milan, January 17, 1901.
Verdi's significant works fall into three periods. The first, covering exactly two years, includes Nabnco, I Lombardi, and Ern-ani, a fine trio, which shows a constantly increasing growth in power. Then, after a period of seeming retrogression, in the latter years of which he seemed to have again "found himself," comes a second, and extremely fruitful period, beginning with Rigoletto, and including, among others, II Trovatore and La Traviata. Again, he seems to have evolved a newer and greater art, while giving proofs of his mastery of the older, and we have the Verdi of Aida, Otello, and Falstaff.
Ernani, from which the aria on our program is taken, is the third in the first group. It was first produced March 9, 1844. The aria occurs in Act I and the text and translation run as follows:
Recit :-Surta e le notte, e Silva non retorna! Ah! non tornasse ei piu!
Questo odiato veglio, che quale immondo spettro ognor m'insegue
Col favellar d'amore,
Piu sempre Ernani mi configge in core.
Night is approaching, and Silva not returned ! Ah! might he ever stay!
Never thus to haunt me, A dark and fearful phantom my life to follow
With vows of love to proffer,
Thou only Ernani, hast a home in my bosom!
PAGE FORTY-TWO]
FOURTH CONCERT
Cavatina :-Ernani! Ernani, involarai all'abborrito
amplesso Fuggiamo Se teco vivere mi sai d'amor
concesso, perantri e lande inospite
ti seguira il mio pie. Un Eden di delizia saran quegli antri a
me. M'e dolce il voto ingenuo che il vostro
cor mi fa. Tutto sprezzo che d'Ernani non favella a
questo core Non v'ha gemma che in amore possa
l'odio tramutar Ah! Vola, o tempo e presto reca di mia
fuga il lieto istante; vola, a tempo, al
core amante e supplizio l'indugiar.
Ernani, Ernani, fly with me, Far from this scene of sorrow, Forever to dwell in joy with thee, And life from love to borrow, Thro' other lands tho' dark and drear, I follow thee with my love, with my love; An Eden of rapture, Life then forever will prove, Worthless gift that of Ernani, Tells not fondly the love and sadness. Gold can never turn into gladness, The hatred born of today! Ah! fly, oh! moments, and relieve me, From this dark and o'er-whelming dejection:
Sever, fate, this abhor'd connection; There is torment in delay.
"Ode on a Grecian Urn' "j
SchErzo--"Fancy" and [from First Choral Symphony Hoist
"Folly's Song," J
(First performance in America) University Choral Union
Gustav Hoist was born at Cheltenham, England, Sept. 27th, 1874.
Since Mr. Hoist appeared as guest conductor in the Thirtieth Festival of 1922-23, at which concerts several of his choral and orchestral works had their first American performance under his baton, he has continued to der velop his methods of writing in several operas and orchestral pieces. He was commissioned to compose a choral work for the Leeds Triennial Festival in the Fall of 1925, and the First Choral Symphony received its first performance at Leeds on the 7th of October, 1925. Albert Coates, was the conductor of the Leeds Festival Chorus and the London Symphony Orchestra.
The critic of the London Times describes the event as a "Wonderful performance of the principal new work in the Festival program--a work which taxes the powers of the executants to the utmost. For his text, Mr. Heist has selected several poems of Keats, and in his own unique musical style has woven about them a musical fabric of unusual simplicity and incomparable beauty." On this occasion the first and fourth movements will be omitted. Of the slow movement, a daring setting of the "Ode on a Grecian Urn," the London Times says, "It stands out above all else. Here Hoist has got the spirit of Keats' Ode and held it. There is an icy coldness in the whole conFor more complete biographical matter, see Program Book of the Thirtieth Festival, 1923.
[PAGE FORTY-THREE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
ception which is beautiful in a way that must be called truly classical. No emotional climaxes or restless effects here, the music moves calmly on throughout, to the inevitable line 'Beauty is Truth,' which sums up the whole. The Scherzo, 'Fancy's Song' is brilliant writing, but of a kind much easier to do, though not easy to sing."
The choral portion of all the movements of the symphony is divided between a semi-chorus and a full chorus. In the Ode the passages alternate between each group quite regularly; the orchestral support is classically simple. In the Scherzo, the entire first section, "Fancy," is allotted to the semi-chorus, while "Folly's Song" is sung by the entire group. The Scherzo is instrumental in conception and although the composer suggests that it may be performed by the orchestra alone, the exquisite union of words atid tones and the fanciful atmosphere created by the text would prove an immeasurable loss if omitted.
Hoist's style, above all, is direct, simple yet forceful. There are no superfluous decorations, no bizarre vocal or instrumental ornaments. The rhythm and the meaning of the text condition the rhythm and curve of the melodic and harmonic line, yielding a clarity of effect frequently absent in choral writing. His harmony and counterpoint (the perpendicular and horizontal relations of tones) are compounded of the spirit of Hucbald, a monk of the ioth century, who first wrote music in more than one tone line, and of the spirit of the Tudor composers (16th and 17th centuries) whose compositions in many voice parts exhibited a feeling for the subtler shades of musical expression. Hoist has stated in modern terms and modified to meet the technique of present day compositions, the fundamental principles of vocal part writing which are to be found perhaps less effectively expressed in the periods referred to above.
The use of the intervals of the open fourth and fifth, singly or superimposed in chords of new color, is a factor in the Hoist style. Another easily recognized characteristic is the sudden juxtaposition of unrelated keys. In the Scherzo, for example, are to be found melodies touching keys which in the classical harmony of Mozart or Beethoven were supposed to be very distantly related. Note particularly the setting of the first line "Ever let the fancy roam;" the keys of C and D flat are suggested in these few measures. The mood of both the movements is freshened and vitalized by the freedom from the limitations of tonality. It is the modern interpretation of the principle of modality which was the basis of musical expression from the time of the Greeks to the time of Bach.
The Keats poem, Ode on a Grecian Urn is so well known as to make comment in this connection almost unnecessary. It will be recalled that this Ode was written at the very zenith of Keats' development, and as Amy
The program of the concert given by the English Singers during the current season contained examples of both secular and sacred compositions of this Golden Age of Vocal Music in England.
PAGE FORTY-FOUR]
xc bvvbvb
zv cv
FOURTH CONCERT
From the ploughboy's heavy shoon;
When the Night doth meet the Noon
In a dark conspiracy
To banish even from her sky.
Sit thee there, and send abroad,
With a mind self-overaw'd,
Fancy, high-commission'd:--send her!
She has vassals to attend her:
She will bring, in spite of frost,
Beauties that the earth hath lost;
She will bring thee, all together,
All delights of summer weather;
All the buds and bells of May,
From dewy sward or thorny spray;
All the heaped Autumn's wealth,
With a still, mysterious stealth:
She will mix these pleasure up
Like three fit wines in a cup,
And thou shalt quaff it;--thou shalt hear
Distant harvest carols clear;
Rustle of the reaped corn;
Sweet birds antheming the morn :
And, in the same moment-hark!
"Pis the early April lark,
Or the rooks, with busy caw,
Foraging for sticks and straw:
Thou shalt, at one glance, behold
The daisy and the marigold;
White-plumed lilies, and the first
Hedge-grown primrose that hath burst;
Shaded hyacinth, alway,
Sapphire queen of the mid-May;
And every leaf, and every flower
Pearled with the self-same shower.
Thou shalt see the field-mouse peep
Meagre from its celled sleep;
And the snake all winter-thin
Cast on sunny bank its skin;
Freckled nest-eggs thou shalt see
Hatching in the hawthorn-tree,
When the hen-bird's wing doth rest
Quiet on her mossy nest;
Then the hurry and alarm
When the bee-hive casts its swarm;
Acorns ripe down-pattering,
While the autumn breezes sing.
[PAGE FORTY-SEVEN
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
Oh, sweet Fancy! let her loose; Everything is spoilt by use; Where's the cheek that doth not fade, Too much gazed at! Where's the maid Whose lip mature is ever new Where's the eye, however blue, Doth not weary Where's the face One would meet in every place Where's the voice, however soft, One would hear so very oft
Ever let the Fancy roam,
Pleasure never is at home:
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth,
Like to bubbles when rain pelteth;
Then let winged Fancy wander
Through the thought still spread beyond her:
Open wide the mind's cage-door,
She'll dart forth, and cloudward soar.
FOLLY'S SONG Chorus
When wedding fiddles are a-playing,
Huzza for folly O! And when maidens go a-Maying,
Huzza for folly O! When a milk-pail is upset,
Huzza for folly O! And the clothes left in the wet,
Huzza for folly O!
When the barrel's set a-broach, Huzza for folly O!
When Kate Eyebrow keeps a coach,
Huzza for folly O! When the pig is over-roasted, And the cheese is over-toasted, When Sir Snap is with his lawyer, And Miss Chip has kiss'd the sawyer,
Huzza for folly O!
PAGE FORTY-EIGHT]
yan.
yan.
yan.
yan.
yan.
Earl V. Moore
Frederick Stockl
yan.
yan.
Betsy Lane SheparcL.
Elsie Baker
William Simmons
'is
Loi,
lesori,
yan.
Javvves
a
FOURTH CONCERT
ARIA, "Pace, pace mio Dio" from "The Force of Destiny" Verdi
Miss Ponselle
Of the twenty-eight operas which the Italian master conceived, many still hold their place in the repertory of the present day opera companies. Aida, Othello, Falstaff, II Trovatore, Rigoletto, to name only a few, belong to this group. Others like Brnani, Masked Ball and The Force of Destiny are occasionally revived, chiefly on account of one or more brilliant arias or scenes which are of surpassing beauty or dramatic power.
The Force of Destiny never achieved great success, though composed in the group of years which brought forth Don Carlos and Aida. The plot was derived by Verdi's poet-friend, Piave, from a Spanish drama entitled, "Don Alvaro;" the first performance took place at St. Petersberg, 1862. The gloomy plot and the succession of horrors (at the conclusion of the fifth act not a single character remains alive) were too heavy a burden for even the beautiful music to buoy up on the operatic sea.
Today this opera is known chiefly by the exquisite finale of Act II for bass, soprano and chorus (performed at the 1924 Festival), the tenor duet "Swear in that Hour" made famous by Caruso and Scotti, and the equally well known aria for Soprano, on this evening's program.
Leonora, has sought to forget her lover by hiding in a cave from which she comes forth to implore Heaven to grant her surcease from sorrow and unhappiness through death. The text and translation follow:
Pace, pace, mio Dio,
Cruda sventura
M'astringe, ahime a languir;
Come il di primo da tant' anni dura
Profondeil mio soffrir.
L'amai, gli e ver!
Ma di belta e valore
Cotanto Iddio l'orno
Che l'amo ancor,
Ne togliermi dal core
L'mmagin sua sapro
Fatalita! un delitto ,:
Disgiunti n'haquaggiu! '.
Alvaro, io t'amo,
e su nel cielo e scritto:
Non ti vedro mai piu!
Calm me, O Father!
Cruel misfortune
My woeful heart still tries;
As on the first day, all these years my
portion
Was only tears and sighs. I lov'd him well! Such wonders grace and valor Did Heav'n to him impart, I love him yet, Nor can I bear to banish His image from my heart.
0 bitter fate! Still divides us On earth transgression sore! Alvaro, I love thee!
And yon in heav'n 'tis written:
1 ne'er shall see thee more!
IP AGE FORTY-NINE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
Oh Dio, fa ch'io muoja;
Che la calma
Puo darmi morte sol.
Invan la pace que spero quest' alma
In pre da a tanto, duol!
Misero pane a prolungarmi vieni
La sconsolata vita, Ma chi giunge Chi profanare ardisce il sacro loco Maledizione!
Oh Heaven let me perish!
Peace my spirit
Will find alone in death;
For 'tis in vain I pray my anguish
May cease on earth till fails my breath!
Food, how I loathe thee, that are but set
before me
This wretched life to lengthen! Who is coming Who is't, that dares profane these holy
precincts Be he accursed!
Translated by Dr. H. Baker.
SUITE, "Through the Looking Glass" Taylor
Deems Taylor was born December 22, 1885, at New York.
Deems Taylor is a name already significant in the honor roll of American composers: not because he was born in New York and is a product of the school system of our metropolis, with an additional four-year course at New York University from which he received an A. B. degree in 1906; nor because of his professional experience in the journalistic field, culminating in his appointment as music critic of the New York World in 1921 to succeed the late James G. Huneker, a position which he held until 1925 when he resigned to devote his entire time to composition. He has achieved his present position by reason of the fact that, although self taught in composition and orchestration, his compositions have a directness, a vitality and originality, yet withal a logical honesty and charm, that has attracted the listening public whenever they have been performed.
More recently, and more spectacularly he has achieved distinction through the successful results of his collaboration with Edna St. Vincent Millay in the creation of The King's Henchman--an outstanding work for the musico-dramatic stage. This opera was the outcome of a commission from the Metropolitan Opera Company for an operatic work in English. Since its premiere, February 17, 1927, thirteen performances have been given, which is an indication of its immediate acceptance as an opera of merit; and more significant still, Mr. Taylor has received another commission to write a second work to be ready for presentation in the New Metropolitan Opera House which, it is expected, will be opened two years hence.
Mr. Taylor has an imposing list of compositions in the larger forms, including cantatas, symphonic poems, etc. His musicianship is further eviPAGE FIFTY]
FOURTH CONCERT
denced in the more than sixty arrangements and translations of Russian, German, French and Italian songs for the Schumann Club (Women's Voices) of New York City.
The Suite "Through the Looking Glass," was written in 1917-19 for flute, oboe, clarinet, bassoon, horn, pianoforte and strings, and in that form was produced by the New York Chamber Music Society at its concert in Ann Arbor February 28, 1921.
The Suite, in its present (revised) form for full orchestra was first performed by the New York Symphony Orchestra in 1923, and to the program book on that occasion the composer contributed the following description of his composition:
The suite needs no extended analysis. It is based on Lewis Carroll's immortal nonsense fairy-tale, "Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There'," and the five pictures it presents will, if all goes well, be readily recognizable to lovers of the book. There are four movements, the first being subdivided into two connected parts.
1 (a). Dedication. Carroll precedes the tale with a charming poetical foreword, the first stanza of which the music aims to express. It runs:
Child of the pure, unclouded brow
And dreaming eyes of wonder! Though time be fleet, and I and thou
Are half a life asunder, Thy loving smile will surely hail
The love-gift of a fairy-tale.
A simple song-theme, briefly developed, leads to-(b). The Garden of Live Flowers. Shortly after Alice had entered the looking-glass country she came to a lovely garden in which the flowers were talking--in the words of the Tiger-Lily, "as well as you can, and a great deal louder." The music, therefore, reflects the brisk chatter of the swaying, bright-colored denizens of the garden.
II. Jabberwocky. This is the poem that so puzzled Alice, and which Humpty-Dumpty finally explained to her. The theme of that frightful beast, the Jabberwock, is first announced by the full orchestra. The clarinet then begins the tale, recounting how, on a "brillig" afternoon, the "slithy toves did gyre and gimble in the wabe." Muttered imprecations by the bassoon warn us to "beware the Jabberwock, my son." A miniature march signalizes the approach of our hero, taking "his vorpal sword in hand." Trouble starts among the trombones--the Jabberwock is upon us! The battle with the monster is recounted in a short and rather repellant fugue, the double-basses bringing up the subject and the hero fighting back in the interludes. Finally his vorpal blade (really a xylophone) goes "snicker-snack" and the monster, impersonated by the solo bassoon, dies a lingering and convulsive death. The hero returns to the victorious strains of his
[PAGE FIFTY-ONE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
own theme--"O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay!" The whole orchestra rejoices--the church bells are rung--alarums and excursions.
Conclusion. Once more the slithy toves perform their pleasing evolutions, undisturbed by the uneasy ghost of the late Jabberwock.
Looking-glass Insects. Here we find the vociferous diptera that made such an impression upon Alice--the Bee-elephant, the Gnat, the Rocking-horse-fly, the Snap dragon-fly, and the Bread-and-Butter-fly. There are several themes, but there is no use trying to decide which insect any one of them stands for.
The White Knight. He was a toy Don Quixote, mild, chivalrous, ridiculous, and rather touching. He carried a mouse-trap on his saddle-bow, "because, if they do come, I don't choose to have them running about." He couldn't ride very well, but he was a gentle soul, with good intentions. There are two themes; the first, a sort of in strumental prance, being the Knight's own conception of himself as a slashing, dare devil fellow. The second is bland, mellifluous, a little sentimental--much more like the Knight as he really was. The first theme starts off bravely, but falls out of the saddle before very long, and has to give way to the second. The two alternate, in various guises, until the end, when the Knight rides off, with Alice waving her handkerchief-he thought it would encourage him if she did.
SONGS:
Wings of Night Winter Watts
Eros Grieg
Lullaby Cyril Scott
Piper of Love Carew
Miss Ponselle
(a) WINGS OF NIGHT
Dreamily over the roofs,
The cold spring rain is falling;
Out in a lonely tree
A bird is calling, calling.
Softly over the earth The wings of night are falling; My heart, like the bird in the tree, Is calling, calling, calling.
(b) EROS
Hear me, ye northern hearts, cold as snow, Ye who seek peace in renouncing resign'dly, Ye wander blindly, ye wander blindly, Ye gather roses where roses ne'er grow. Time speeds his horses, Faint fall your forces.
PAGE FIFTY-TWO]
FOURTH CONCERT
Where are the snows of a year ago
Ne'er comes the past at your yearning returning,
So then be learning my words as they flow:
This is the greatest, naught else can compare!
This is the only one perfectly boundless
Joy men may know!
(c) LULLABY Lullaby, oh Lullaby,
Flow'rs are closed and lambs are sleeping; Lullaby, Lullaby.
While the birds are silence keeping, Lullaby, Oh Lullaby, Sleep my baby, fall a-sleeping-Lullaby, oh, Lullaby, Lullaby, Oh Lullaby, Lullaby, Lullaby.
(d) THE PIPER OF LOVE There's a clear sweet note in the wind of day That calls our list'ning hearts away So over the hills, in the sunny noon, Where the Piper of Love plays magic tune, There's a sweeter trill from each bird of song And roses carpet the way along And skies are golden, the whole time thro' Where the Piper of Love, beguiles us to. For who can resist his magic sway, Ah When the Piper of Love begins to play.
There's a clear sweet note in the wind of day,
That calls our list'ning hearts away;
So over the Hills, in the sunny noon
Where the Piper of Love plays magic tune.
There's a magic world of magic flow'rs
And magic music for magic hours. '
So, over the hills, in magic thrall
When the Piper of Love, our hearts may call,
For who can resist his magic sway, Ah
When the Piper of Love begins to play.
DANCES from "Scenes de Ballet" Op. 52.................Glazounoff
Preambule
Marionettes
Scherzino
Pas d'Action
Valse
Polonaise
Alexandre Glazounoff was born August io, 1865 at Petrograd. Alexandre Glazounoff was born into affluence. None of the leading Russian composers have known the bitterness of poverty--Glinka was a
[PAGE FIFTY-THREE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
nobleman--and few have been obliged to wait for years--as did Wagner-in order to have their works performed. When one who has every opportunity to dawdle through a life of mere pleasure becomes such a master of composition in serious forms as Glazounoff, one may not question the purpose which animates him, even though he must justify himself before an all-world jury of his peers before he can accomplish his aim, if that be fame. Overtures, symphonies, and chamber music in various forms testify to his high ideals and indefatigable industry.
The Suite "Scenes de Ballet" consists of eight movements, (the third and the sixth being omitted in this interpretation) and was composed by the Russian master in 1894 and dedicated to the members of the orchestra of the Opera in Moscow. The movements are simply constructed, and may be listened to with complete abandonment to their melodic, rhythmic and "color" charms.
Preambule {Allegro, A major, 12-8 time). The main theme is preceded by an extensive Introduction which begins with a fanfare for the horns and trumpets. The principal subject {Allegretto, 6-8 time) is given out by the first violins and is taken up by the woodwind.
Marionettes. The movement opens, after a short Introduction, with a theme (Allegro, D major, 3-8 time) in the piccolo, the glockenspiel taking a prominent part. The trio, in G major, brings forward a subject in the first violins, part of it being played in harmonics by a solo violin. Following this the third division appears as a modified repetition of the first. With the exception of two horns no brass instruments are employed in the orchestration of the piece.
Schersino. {Allegro, A major, 2-4 time.) The movement is almost entirely constructed from the matter presented at the beginning of it by the muted strings and woodwind instruments.
Pas d'Action. {Adagio, D major, 4-4 time.) Upon the expressive theme announced by the violoncellos after one measure of introduction the whole movement is based. With this theme other instruments--especially the first violins--play as in a duet. A tranquil coda brings the piece to a conclusion.
Valse. This movement opens with an Introduction {Allegro moderato, C major, 3-4 time), the theme appearing in the thirteenth measure in the violins. The trio, in A flat major, is announced by a solo violin, the flute taking up a second section of it. The third part repeats the first, and a coda makes use of the material of the Introduction.
Polonaise. An Introduction {Moderato, A major, 3-4 time) twenty-three bars long precedes the principal subject. The material of this is built on an organ-point and foreshadows the rhythmical figure of the theme of the movement proper. The chief subject is given out forte by the full orchestra. This having been worked over, the trio is presented by the oboe, lightly accompanied by the strings. The first subject returns, and the piece is brought to an end by a coda of sonorous brilliancy.
PAGE FIFTY-FOUR]
FIFTH CONCERT
Saturday Afternoon, May 21
SYMPHONY No. 10, C major -----Schubert
Andante--Allegro ma non Troppo; Andante con moto; Scherzo; Finale.
Franz Peter Schubert was born January 31, 1797, at Lichtenthal; died November 19, 1828, at Vienna.
In this program Schubert, the High Priest of Melody, is brought into relation to Beethoven, the High Priest of the Symphony through the E flat concerto for pianoforte and orchestra and memories of the symphony, Mass and overture which are a part of this Festival's programs. Unlike his older and more distinguished contemporary, Schubert propounded no new problems in his symphonies and the other instrumental works. He was a prophetic genius only in his great songs, some of which were heard on the first program of this series. He filled his symphonies to overflowing with melodies which developed rare beauty, and which seemed to have been the result of an unconscious productivity. Reveling in their sweetness, with confidence that every listener would endorse him, Schubert repeats them far beyond the limits of his forms, and when at last a movement comes to an end, we would find no fault were we to hear those melodies just once--or twice --more. But losing them in one movement, we know that we shall gain others of equal beauty in each succeeding number. What can criticism do when thus held in thrall In the main, just what was done in Schubert's time and just what is being done now--refer to his prolixity and call attention to his lack of dramatic power. There are places in Schubert's C major Symphony where one feels the cold thrills, but they are few and are mere matters of detail.
Written in 1828--"Symfonie, Marz 1828--Frz. Schubert Mpia," stands on the MSS.--it was first performed at a Gewandhaus Concert in Leipzig, March 21, 1839. Robert Schumann received the manuscript from Schubert's brother Ferdinand some time in 1838-39, and sent it to Leipzig that it might be performed under Mendelssohn's direction. In the Neue Zeitsch-rift fur Musik (March 10, 1840), he writes of Die Symphonie von Franz Schubert with great enthusiasm, stating that, "I hardly know where to begin
[PAGE FIFTY-FIVE
OFFICIAL PROGRAM
or where to stop." He speaks of its "heavenly length," as a "storehouse of riches," of its inner essence as "life, color and romance." In one place he cites a horn passage which seems to "sound from a far distant realm of magic." When Schubert turned the manuscript over to the "Society of the Friends of Music" (Vienna), it was considered too difficult for performance. Even after several Leipzig performances proved its practicability, as well as essential greatness, they found it, to quote from Castelli's Allgemeinen Musikalischer Anzeiger Wein. 1839, No. 52, "a skirmish of instruments. Although a thorough knowledge of composition was shown, Schubert did not seem able to control masses of tone--I believe it would have been better to have let the work rest in quiet"!!!
First Movement
The principal theme of the first movement--C major; 2-2 time; Allegro ma nn troppo--follows a conventional slow introduction, and moves along with a resolute determination that stirs the blood and displays the vigor of Schubert's muse. The form in which the theme displays itself
8 8
Â

Download PDF