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UMS Concert Program, March 4, 1951: Seventy-second Annual Choral Union Concert Series -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra

UMS Concert Program, March 4, 1951: Seventy-second Annual Choral Union Concert Series -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, March 4, 1951: Seventy-second Annual Choral Union Concert Series -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, March 4, 1951: Seventy-second Annual Choral Union Concert Series -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, March 4, 1951: Seventy-second Annual Choral Union Concert Series -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image
Day
4
Month
March
Year
1951
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University Musical Society
OCR Text

Season: 1950-1951
Concert: Eighth
Complete Series: 3050
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan

UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Charles A. Sink, President
Thor Johnson, Guest Conductor ;
Lester McCoy, Associate Conductor
Eighth Concert
1950-1951
Complete Series 3OS0
Seventy-second Annual
Choral Union Concert Series
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
RAFAEL KUBELIK, Conductor
Sunday Evening, March 4, 1951 at 8:30 Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan
PROGRAM Overture to "The School for Scandal"......Barber
Symphony No. 1 in D major, Op. 60......Dvorak
Allegro non tanto Adagio
Scherzo (furient) Finale--allegro con spirito
INTERMISSION
Theme and Four Variations ("The Four Temperaments")
for String Orchestra and Piano.......Hindemtth
Theme
Variation No. 1: Melancholic Variation No. 2: Sanguine Variation No. 3: Phlegmatic Variation No. 4: Choleric
George Schick at the Piano
Prelude to "The Mastersingers of Nuremberg" .... Wagner
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra ttses the Baldwin piano, and records exclusively for R.C.A. Victor.
Note.--The University Musical Society has presented the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on previous occasions as follows: Choral Union Series, Theodore Thomas, conductor (8); in thirty-one May Festivals (1905-1935 inclusive), and in the Choral Union Series, Nov. 2, 1936 and Nov. 30, 1941, Frederick Stock, conductor; Mar. 19, 1945, Jan. 31, 1946, and Mar. 16, 1947, Desirf Defauw, conductor; Oct. 26, 1947, Artur Rodzinski, conductor; Mar. 27, 1949, Fritz Busch, Guest Conductor; and Mar. 12, 1950, Fritz Reiner, Guest Conductor.
ARS LONGA VITA BREVIS
PROGRAM NOTES
By Felix Borowski
(Taken from the Program Book of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra)
Overture to "The School for Scandal" .... Samuel Barber
The overture to "The School for Scandal" was composed in 1932 and was performed for the first time at a summer concert of the Philadelphia Orchestra at Robin Hood Dell, Philadelphia, August 30, 1933. On that occasion the program book was supplied with the following analysis, written by Samuel Laciar:
"The overture begins with a very rapid figure for the full orchestra, except trombones, followed by a lilting melody in 9-8 time in the first violins, which is developed somewhat by other instruments of the orchestra. A second figure in the piccolo and flutes then appears, a phrase which plays an important part later in the overture. There is a change to a slightly slower tempo, and the second subject, a melodious tune, is played by the oboe, followed by a new figure in the first clarinet, with an accompaniment in the strings reminiscent of the oboe melody. This leads, through the flutes and strings, the latter in very rapid figuration, back to the first subject and in the original tempo. The second theme, first announced by the oboe, now returns in the clarinets and violas and later in the first violins. There is a return of the triplet figure, and the overture closes with a joyous rush in the full orchestra. The music is in keeping with the spirit of the Sheridan comedy, itself a great stage classic."
Symphony No. 1, D major, Op. 60.....Anton Dvorak
The published number on the title pages of Dvorak's symphonies is not at all the order in which they were composed. The work performed on this occasion, published as No. 1, is in reality the sixth of the series. His last symphony--"From the New World"--was published as No. S, but was the composer's ninth.
The D-major symphony was composed at Vysoka, Dvorak's country place which he had bought from Count Kouni, and for which he had a great fondness. When the score was finished October IS, 1880, he hurried to Vienna to show it to Hans Richter-then the world's most famous conductor--and, at the same time, to offer him the dedication. In a letter written home in the course of the sojourn in the Austrian capital, Dvorak wrote: "Richter liked the symphony very much indeed, so that after each movement he embraced me. He will perform it December 26. Then it will go to London."
Concerning this D-major symphony, Paul Stevan, in his biography, Anton Dvofdk, wrote: "This particular symphony seems strikingly akin to Brahms, in some way corresponding to the latter's Second, composed in the same key. Nevertheless, Brahms' airy gaiety was not achieved with a light heart, whereas Dvorak's symphony in its entirety is the outpouring of a joyous spirit intoxicated with the world."
Theme and Four Variations ("The Four Temperaments")
for String Orchestra and Piano.....Paul Hindemith
Hindemith composed his Theme and Four Variations in 1940, his first conception of it having been in the form of a ballet. This later was abandoned in favor of the work now to be heard.
The following analysis was made by Dr. Frederick Dorian when "The Four Temperaments" was played at a concert of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.
"The Theme is set forth in three distinct sections. First, the orchestra announces a moderato in 4-4 time. Next we hear an allegro assai intoned by the piano. There is another moderato, but the meter is changed to 6-8 with the orchestra carrying the last section of the theme. Variations I. Melancholic. The dejected state of the soul is mirrorpictured in a slow song of the muted violins. The role of the piano is kept in the background. Presently a presto, pianissimo, in 12-8 is played by the orchestra. Yet the depressed music returns, a slow march, the piano now leading the accompanying strings. Variation II. Sanguine. A lively waltz portrays the warm and ardent type of temperament. Piano and strings participate evenly in the performance of the 3-4 dance pattern. Variation III. Phlegmatic. There is a moderato of 4-4 time in the strings until the piano takes the lead. Allegretto, in 12-8, a dialogue evolves in which the strings answer the phrases of the piano. An allegretto scherzando concludes. Variation IV. Choleric. Accumulated anger is symbolized in bursting sounds on the keyboard. An acceleration follows. Vivace. The orchestra is heard until appassionato claims both sonorities, the piano and the grouped strings. A maestoso brings the original movement to an end."
Prelude to "The Mastersingers of Nuremberg" . . Richard Wagner
The Prelude to "Die Meistersinger von Nurnberg" is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, kettledrums, triangle, symbals, harp, and strings.
The piece begins (Sehr massig bewegt, C major, 4-4 time), with the grandiose theme typical of the Mastersingers. After this has been heard there is brought forward a tender little theme (flute and clarinet) suggestive of the romance of Eva and her lover, Walther. This lasts only for fourteen measures, and another theme characteristic of the Mastersingers appears in the wind, the motive of which is intended to depict the banner of the Mastersingers, whereon is emblazoned King David playing the harp, an outward and visible emblem of the pride and dignity of the Corporation. There is much working over of this majestic subject; and, at length, there appears (in the first violins) a theme taken from the prize-song, and intended to represent the love of Eva and her knightly Walther. The passionate expression of this division is suddenly interrupted by a new section in which there is a humorous treatment of the opening subject in jerky staccato notes played by the woodwind. Soon there is a thunderous outburst in which the massive subject of the Mastersingers appears in the brass, fortissimo. This leads into a remarkable contrapuntal combination of the three principal themes, a restatement of the "Banner" motive in the brass, and a concluding presentation of the imposing subject with which the Prelude opened.
MAY FESTIVAL
MAY 3, 4, 5, 6, 1951
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL CONCERTS
PATRICE MUNSEL, Soprano EILEEN FARRELL, Soprano RISE STEVENS, Mezzo-Soprano BLANCHE THEBOM, Contralto COLOMAN de PATAKY, Tenor OSCAR NATZKA, Bass TOSSY SPIVAKOVSKY, Violinist ARTUR RUBINSTEIN, Pianist
WILLIAM KAPELL, Pianist EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor THOR JOHNSON, Conductor ALEXANDER HILSBERG, Conductor MARGUERITE HOOD, Conductor UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION FESTIVAL YOUTH CHORUS
PROGRAMS
THURSDAY, MAY 3, 8:30
Eugene Ormandy, Conductor Arrur Rubinstein, Pianist
Toccata and Fugue in D minor Bach-Ormandy
Concerto No. 2......Chopin
Artur Rubinstein Symphonie fantastique .... Berlioz
FRIDAY, MAY 4, 8:30
Thor Johnson, Conductor Eileen Farrell, Soprano Coloman de Potaky, Blanche Thebom, Tenor
Contralto Oscar Natzka, Bass
University Choral Union
Requiem Mass......Vekdi
Choral Union and Soloists
SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2:30
Alexander Hilsberg and Marguerite Hood,
Conductors Tossy Spivakovsky, Violinist
Festival Youth Chorus Overture to Manfred . . , Schumann
American Folk Songs (orchestrated by Dorothy
James)
Festival Youth Chorus
Rapsodie espagnole .....Ravel
Concerto in D minor .... Sibelius Tossy Sptvakovskv
SATURDAY, MAY 5, 8:30
Eugene Ormandy, Conductor Rise Stevens, Mezzo-Soprano
Suite for Strings, Op. 5 ... Cokelli
"Che faro senza Euridice" from
Orpheo ed Euridice .... Gluck "Voi che sapete" from
Marriage oj Figaro .... Mozart "II est doux, il est bon"
from Hirodiade .... Massenet
Rtse Stevens
Symphony No. 1 ... Shostakovkh
Air de Lia from L'Enjant prodiguc Debussy
Habanera from Carmen .... Bizet
SeguidiHa from Carmen .... Bizet
Miss Stevens
Polka and Fugue from Schwanda Weinberger
SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2:30
Thor Johnson, Conductor William Kapell, Pianist
Oscar Natzko, Bass University Choral Union
Overture, "Fingal's Cave" . . Mendelssohn
A Masque, "Summer's Last Will
and Testament" .... Lambert
Choral Union anp Soloists
Concerto No. 3.....Prokofisff
William Kapell
SUNDAY, MAY 6, 8:30
Eugene Ormandy, Conductor Patrice Munsel, Soprano
Overture to "Euryanthe" . . . Weber
"Chacun le sait" from
The Daughter of the Regiment . Donizetti "0 mio babbino caro" from
Gianni Schicchi .... PucciNl
"Mia chiamana Mimi" from
La Boheme......Puccini
Patrice Munsel
Symphony No. 3.....Creston
Lucy's Arietta from The Telephone . Menotti Willow Song . . . Coleridge-Taylor
Norwegian Echo Song .... Thrane The Laughing Song from
Die Fledermaus.....Strauss
Miss Munsel
Suite from Der Rosenkavatier . . Strauss
Season Tickets Now On Sale--$12.00--$10.80--$9.60 (tax included).
HEIFETZ, Violinist........Wednesday, March 14
HOROWITZ, Pianist.........Wednesday, April 18

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