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UMS Concert Program, March 10, 1961: Dallas Symphony Orchestra --

UMS Concert Program, March 10, 1961: Dallas Symphony Orchestra --  image UMS Concert Program, March 10, 1961: Dallas Symphony Orchestra --  image UMS Concert Program, March 10, 1961: Dallas Symphony Orchestra --  image UMS Concert Program, March 10, 1961: Dallas Symphony Orchestra --  image
Day
10
Month
March
Year
1961
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Season: Eighty-second
Concert: Ninth
Complete Series: 3314
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan

1960 Eighty-second Season 1961
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Charles A. Sink, President Gail W. Rector, Executive Director Lester McCoy, Conductor
Ninth Concert Eighty-second Annual Choral Union Series Complete Series 3314
Dallas Symphony Orchestra
PAUL KLETZKI, Conductor
Friday Evening, March 10, 1961, at 8:30 Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan
PROGRAM
Symphony No. 95 in C minor........Haydn
Allegro moderato Andante
Menuetto: trio Vivace
Variations on a Theme by Haydn, Op. 56a.....Brahms
INTERMISSION
"Mysterious Mountain," Op. 132......Hovhaness
Overture Fantasy, "Romeo and Juliet" .... Tchaikovsky
Mr. Kletzki records exclusively for Angel Records.
The Steinway is the official piano of the University Musical Society. ARS LONGA VITA BREVIS
PROGRAM NOTES
Symphony No. 95, C minor......Franz Josef Haydn
Haydn made two rather lengthy visits to London and on each he took with him a set of six new symphonies which had been commissioned by Johann Peter Salomon. At the time of his first visit to London, Haydn was not quite sixty and in the best period of his life, musically and otherwise. His triumphs in London came about through the ministrations of one of the leading violinists of the day, the aforementioned Salomon, who was a strong supporter of Haydn's music. He had tried for many years to get Haydn to London for a series of concerts and the two had corresponded on the subject, but without success because of Haydn's contract with Prince Esterhazy. In 1790, by chance, as Salomon was en route from Italy to Germany, he read in the newspapers of Esterhazy's death and immediately changed his course to Vienna in order to meet with Haydn and propose the long-hoped-for London visit. He was successful in his per?suasions and carried Haydn off to England.
During Haydn's long years in the service of Prince Esterhazy he had at his com?mand the abilities of some of the best orchestra musicians in Europe. Nevertheless, he had to allow for curiously unequal levels in his orchestrations even in his London symphonies, of which this No. 95 belongs to the first set.
The Symphony No. 95 is unique in one respect; it is the only one of the twelve Salomon symphonies that dispenses with the slow introduction with which Haydn opened so many of his works in this form. It is also unusual in the choice of key; only one other symphony of the dozen is in a minor key and that is the "Clock" Symphony in D minor. In this C minor Symphony there are many spiritual references to Mozart, Haydn's brilliant pupil, whose death occurred in the same year it was written.
Variations on a Theme by Haydn, Op. 56a . . Johannes Brahms
The "Variations on a Theme by Haydn" (discounting the two Serenades) was Brahms's first important work for orchestra and a work which prepared him for the First Symphony, finished three years later. It was in 1870 that Karl Frederick Pohl (biographer of Haydn) brought to Brahms a score of one of sue divertimenti for winds which Haydn had supposedly written for a military band employed by Prince Esterhazy, his patron. The theme of the second movement, entitled "Chorale St. Antonni," was an old Austrian pilgrims' song. Brahms was much taken with it and copied it into his note book for reference. Three years later his work was completed in two versions--one for full orchestra and a version for two pianos (the a and b of opus 56) and there is apparently no indication which came first. The first performance was under the com?poser's direction with the Vienna Philharmonic in November of 1873. It was heard in this country a year later at one of Theodore Thomas' concerts.
The orchestration of the opening Chorale is much the same as the original in Haydn's score, winds and brass but with the addition of basses playing pizzicato. The variations, which number eight plus a Finale, do not expose the theme readily to the average listener. However, the following analysis may help to identify the material. variation i: The theme is hidden under a delicate tracery of violins. variation II: Clarinets and bassoons in sixths have a rhythmic likeness to the theme. variation m: Oboes and bassoons peacefully flow along above double octaves for the lower strings.
variation rv: This variation is a masterpiece of contrapuntal skill. Oboe and horn carry the melody accompanied by the lower strings.
variation v: The strings here present an inversion of the first notes of the choral theme.
variation vi: The strings are pizzicato, outlining the theme. Both this variation and No. V are brilliant and light in mood.
variation vn: This variation is in Siciliano rhythm. It presents a gracious downward-dipping theme which is, of course, derived from the chorale theme. It is one of the most charming bits that Brahms ever wrote.
variation vm: In this variation the strings are muted. The theme is inverted. Wood?winds "creep stealthily" about and there is an air of mystery to the whole. finale: The strings announce a ground bass which is directly from the opening of the chorale theme. As the instruments enter, climax is piled upon climax in increasing elaboration. The winds first and then the strings have rushing scale-passages which build up to a tremendous conclusion.
"Mysterious Mountain," Op. 132.....Alan Hovhaness
This work was commissioned by Leopold Stokowski for the Houston Symphony and was first played there in October, 1955.
It was later heard in Cleveland, Detroit, and Boston. Stokowski took the work with him when he conducted in Russia in the summer of 1958, and played it in Moscow, Leningrad, and Kiev.
The title of "Mysterious Mountain" was added after the work was completed but the composer admits that the title was not a contrived one. "Mountains are symbols, like pyramids, of man's attempt to know God," he writes. "Mountains are symbolic meeting places between the mundane and spiritual world. To some, the Mysterious Mountain may be a phantom peak, unmeasured, thought to be higher than Everest, as seen from great distances by fliers in Tibet. To some, it may be the solitary mountain, the tower of strength over a country-side--Fujiyama, Ararat, Monadnock, Shasta, or Grand Teton."
In describing the form of the "Mysterious Mountain," Mr. Hovhaness says, "The first and last movements are hymn-like and lyrical, making use of irregular metrical forms. The first subject of the second movement, a double fugue, is developed in a slow vocal style. The rapid second subject is played by the strings, with its own counter subject and with strict four-voice canonic episodes and triple counterpoint episodes. In the last movement a chant in 74 time is played softly by muted horns and trom?bones. A giant wave in a 13-beat meter rises to a climax and recedes ... A middle melody is sung by the oboes and clarinets in a quintuple beat. Muted violins return from the earlier chant, which is gradually given to the full orchestra."
Overture Fantasy, "Romeo and Juliet" . Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky
This Overture Fantasy was written in 1869 and is based upon the Shakespeare tragedy. There is an introduction in which the theme of Friar Lawrence is first heard in solemn, hymn-like tones in the woodwinds. Dissonances hint at the tragedy to follow. After this the exposition proper begins with a fast-moving vigorous theme which portrays the hostility between the Montagues and the Capulets. The passionate love theme appears as the second theme of the exposition. It is scored for English horn and violas. A tender, caressing figure for muted strings is heard as the lovers murmur endear?ments and finally a fragmentary figure for bassoon ends the love scene. The development section is built upon the hostile or feud subject and this appears through a number of changes; Friar Lawrence is heard over the furore. In the recapitulation we hear the love music with intensified color and dynamics until tragedy strikes and the theme darkens and wavers. There is a final statement of the feud theme in the Coda and Friar Lawrence makes a last plea--but it is too late. The drums beat out the ebbing life of the lovers and all is over.
"For never was a story of more woe Than this of Juliet and her Romeo."
MAY FESTIVAL
4 5, 6, 7
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL CONCERTS PROGRAMS
THURSDAY, MAY 4, 8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor BIRGIT NILSSON, Soprano
All-Wagner Program Overture to Die Mcistcrsinger Elsa's Dream, from Lohengrin Prelude to Act I, and Love-Death, from
Tristan and Isolde
Excerpts from Die Gottcrdumtnerung: Siegfried's Rhine Journey Siegfried's Death and Funeral Music Hrunnhilde's Immolation Closing Scene
Birgit Nii.sson
FRIDAY, MAY 5, 8:30 P.M.
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
and Boy Choir
Program
"JOAN OF ARC AT THE STAKE"
Dramatic oratorio--music by Arthur Honegger;
poem by Paul Claudcl.
Joan of Arc.....VERA ZORINA
Brother Dominic .... HUGH NORTON JANICE HARSANYI, Soprano
FRANCES GREER, Soprano
MARY MacKENZIE, Mezzo-soprano
DAVID ILOYD, Tenor
ARA BERBERIAN, Bass
Other speakrrs: Nancy Hcusel,
Jcrrold Sandier, and Marvin Diskin
SATURDAY, MAY 6, 2:30 P.M.
WILLIAM SMITH, Conductor
AARON COPLAND, Guest Conductor
ANSHEL BRUSILOW, Violinist
LORNE MUNROE, Cellist
Program
Overture to Colas Brcugnon . . Kabalevsky Orchestral Variations .... Copland
Conducted by the composer Concerto in A minor, Op. 102 . . Brahms
Anshel Brusilow and Lorne Munroe Suite, from The Tender Land . . Copland
Conducted by the composer Suite No. 2 from the Ballet, Daphnis
and Chloe.......Ravel
SATURDAY, MAY 6, 8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor ROBERT NOEHREN, Organist JOHN BROWNING, Pianist
All-American Program
"Toccata Festiva" for Organ and
Orchestra.......Barber
Robert Noehren
Symphoy No. 7......Piston
Concerto No. 2 in D minor, for Piano
and Orchestra .... MacDowell
Rhapsody in Blue.....Gershwin
Mr. Browning
SUNDAY, MAY 7, 2:30 P.M.
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
JANICE HARSANYI, Soprano
MARY MucKENZIE, Mezzo-soprano
DAVID LLOYD, Tenor WILLIAM WARFIELD, Baritone
Program
ELIJAH, a dramatic oratorio for Chorus, Soloists, and Orchestra,
Op. 70......Mendelssohn
University Choral Union and Soloists
SUNDAY, MAY 7, 8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor EUGENE ISTOMIN, Pianist
All-Rachmaninoff Program Vocalise, Op. 34, No. 14
Concerto No. 2 in D minor Moderato
Adagio sostenuto Allegro scherzando
Eugene Istomin
Symphony No. 2 in E minor, Op. 27 Largo; allegro moderato Allegro molto Adagio
Allegro vivace
Season Tickets: $15.00--$12.00--$10.00--$8.00 Single Concerts: $3.50--$3.00--$2.50--$2.00--$1.50, on sale beginning March 15.
Toronto Symphony Orchestra .... Wednesday, March IS Program: Overture, "The Consecration of the House" . . Beethoven
Pocme dc l'amour et de la mer......CnAussoN
Soloist: Ilona Kombrink, soprano
Symphonic Ode........John Weinzweig
Symphony No. 2 in D minor, Op. 70.....Dvorak
Zino Francescatti, Violinist......Tuesday, March 21
Program: Sonata No. 1...........Handel
Andante and Allegro from Sonata in A minor . . . Bach
Sonata, Op. 94 bis........Prokofieff
Duo Concertante.........Stravinsky
"I Palpiti"...........Paganini
For tickets or information, address: University Musical Society, Burton Memorial Tower.

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