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UMS Concert Program, February 14, 15, 16, 1964: New York Pro Musica -- Noah Greenberg

Day
16
Month
February
Year
1964
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University Musical Society
OCR Text

Season: Eighty-fifth Season
Concert: Third
Complete Series: 3418
Rackham Auditorium Ann Arbor, Michigan

1963 Eighty-fifth Season 1964
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Charles A. Sink, President Gail W. Rector, Executive Director Lester McCoy, Conductor
Third Concert Complete Series 3418
Twenty-fourth Annual CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL
New York Pro Musica
NOAH GREENBERG, Musical Director
SHEILA SCHONBRUN, Soprano
ELIZABETH HUMES, Soprano
EARNEST MURPHY, Countertenor
RAY DE VOLL, Tenor
ARTHUR BURROWS, Baritone
BRAYTON LEWIS, Bass
LaNOUE DAVENPORT: Recorder, Kiummhorn, Cornett SHELLEY GRUSKIN: Flute, Recorder, Krummhorn, Schryari
JUDITH DAVIDOFF: Bass Viol PAUL MAYNARD: Harpsichord, Portative Organ, Regal
The instrumental consort rehearses under the direction of LaNoue Davenport
February 14, 15, 16, 1964 Rackham Auditorium Ann Arbor, Michigan
a r s l o n g a vita " r k y i s
PROGRAM
Sunday, February 16, 2:30 p.m.
EARLY BAROQUE MUSIC OF ITALY AND GERMANY
CLAUDIO MONTEVERDI (1567-1643)
Cantate Domino..........Ensemble
Sing unto the Lord a new song, For He hath done marvelous things.
Laetaniae della Beata Vergine.......Ensemble
Lord, have mercy. Christ, have mercy ... Holy Mary, pray for us. Holy Mother of God, Holy Virgin of virgins, pray for us ...
0 Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the world, have mercy upon us.
CLAUDIO MONTEVERDI
Entrata and Balletto.......Sheila Schonbrun,
Elizabeth Humes, Brayton Lewis, and instruments The due praises of beauty we celebrate in joyous song. Beauty is a ray of heaven's light, which, like the sun in May, Brings us a tempered warmth from which the flowers of love are born.
Ah, dolente partita...........Voices
Ah, sad parting, the end of my life.
In parting I feel a living death that gives life to sorrow.
Hor ch'el ciel e la terra.........Ensemble
Now; that sky and earth and wind are silent And wild beasts and birds are fettered by sleep, Night guides its starry car upon its round, And the sea, without a wave, lies in its bed,
1 stay awake, I think, I burn, I weep;
And she who destroys me Is always before me to my sweet pain; War is my state, full of rage and sorrow, And only in thinking of her have I some peace.
GIROLAMO FRESCOBALDI (1583-1643)
Canzon quinta..........Instruments
TwoCorrenti j......Paul Maynard, harpsichord
Toccata settima) r
GIROLAMO DALLA CASA (ft. c. 1600)
Alix avoit (ornamented version)
.....Shelley Gruskin, flute, and instruments
GIROLAMO FRESCOBALDI
Canzon terza...........Instruments
CLAUDIO MONTEVERDI
Nisi Dominus (Psalm 127)........Ensemble
Unless the Lord build the house, they labor in vain that build it ... Like as the arrows; in the hand of the giant, even so are the young children; happy is the man that hath his quiver full of them.
INTERMISSION
HEINRICH SCHUTZ (1585-1672)
Der Herr ist mein Hirt (Psalm 23) . . . Arthur Burrows, Sheila Schonbrun, Ray De Voll, and instruments The Lord is ray shepherd; I shall not want.
Anima mea liquefacta est (Song of Songs) . Sheila Schonbrun,
Elizabeth Humes, and instruments My soul failed when my beloved spake; Sweet is his voice and comely his face ... Daughters of Jerusalem, tell ye him that I am sick of love.
MICHAEL PRAETORIUS (1571-1621)
A suite of dances..........Instruments
Ballet des coqs Galliarde Ballet and volte Spagnoletta Courante
JOHANN HERMANN SCHEIN (1586-1630)
Wende dich, Herr (Psalm 25).......Ensemble
Turn Thee to me, O Lord, and be merciful ...
The trouble of my heart is great...
Look on my affliction and pain, and forgive me all my sins.
Da Jakob vollendet hatte (Genesis).....Ensemble
When Jacob made an end of commanding his sons, he yielded up the ghost. Joseph fell upon his father's face, and wept upon him and kissed him.
Zion spricht: der Herr hat mich verlassen (Isaiah) . . Ensemble Zion said: The Lord hath forsaken me and forgotten me.
Can a woman forget her suckling child Yea, I will not forget thee; I have graven thee on the palms of my hands.
The New York Pro Musica records exclusively for Decca Gold Label Records, available in monaural and stereo.
SOURCES OF THE MUSIC
I. Tutte le Opere di Claudio Monteverdi Vol. 16, ed. Gian Francesco Malipiero. Universal Edition.
II. 1. Scherzi Musicali, ed. Hilmar Trede. Barenreiter Verlag.
2-3. Tutte le Opere di C. Monteverdi Vols. 1-4-8.
III. 1-5. Canzoni per sonar, ed. Hans T. David. B. Schott's SShne.
2-3. Orgel und Klavierwerke Vol. 4, ed. Pierre Pidoux. Barenreiter Verlag.
4. Ms. transcribed by Imogene Horsley.
IV. Tutte le Opere di C. Monteverdi Vol. 16.
V. 1. Ed. Karl Friedrichs. Moseler Verlag.
2. Symphoniae sacrae I, Nr. 7, ed. Rudolf Gerber. Barenreiter Verlag.
VI. Seeks Tanzfolgen, ed. Adolf Hoffmann. Moseler Verlag.
VII. 1-3. Das Chorwerk Heft 12, ed. Adam Adrio. Moseler Verlag.
2. Israelsbrunnlein 1623, Nr. 10, ed. Adam Adrio. Barenreiter Verlag.
ABOUT THE INSTRUMENTS
Music written for a specific instrumental ensemble was a rarity in the Renaissance and early Baroque eras. But it is untrue to infer from this that the art of orchestration was unknown or that a variety of instruments did not exist in these periods. Contem?porary accounts relate that the striking characteristic of orchestral sound was an infinite variety of instrumental colors.
The musical sources do not indicate any specific instrumentation until the begin?ning of the 17th century, and not always even then. The scoring used by New York Pro Musica is as close as possible to the performance practice contemporary with the compositions. The instruments used in this concert are listed below, with brief descrip?tions. All, except the bass viol and flute are modern constructions, modeled after old instruments in various collections.
Recorders are members of the flute family and were made in consorts or families. Praetorius in his Syntagma Musicum of 1619 shows eleven sizes, but states that the higher voices were seldom used "... as they shriek so."
Viols of all sizes, even the smallest, are held between the legs. In general they have six strings and sloping shoulders in contrast to the straight shoulders of the violin family. The body is thicker than that of the violin, the strings more loosely strung, and the fingerboard is fretted.
The Krummhorn, a soft wind instrument, derives its name from its curved body. Its double reed is encased in a wooden cap, the cap having a hole at the top through which the player blows.
The Schryari or Rauschpfeif is a loud wind instrument, also with a capped double reed. Having a most piercing sound, it was made in families for use in outdoor performances.
The Transverse Flute, still in regular orchestral use, has been changed consider?ably from its original state. Made of wood, not silver, it did not acquire its elaborate hey system until the late 19th century.
The Cornet} combines characteristics of both the brass and woodwind families. The sound is produced via a cup mouthpiece, somewhat like our trumpet, but the instrument is made of wood and is fingered after the manner of a recorder. There are two versions of this instrument; one is straight (Ital., cornetto diritto), while the other, and more popular, is curved. The curved treble cornett has a thin leather cover?ing and its lowest note is either c' or a'. Contrary to other instruments of the time, cornetts were rarely used in families. Besides the treble instrument there was a tenor cornett (Ital., torto) in c, which was used in consort with sackbuts and other mixed ensembles.
The Portative i a small organ consisting of one rank of stopped flue pipes. The Regal is also a one rank organ whose tones are produced by reed pipes with wooden resonators. Both were widely used as ensemble instruments during the middle ages and Renaissance.
The Harpsichord is a single manual keyboard instrument with two sets of strings at eight foot pitch and a harp stop. There are two ranks of jacks; one with leather plectra, the other with quill plectra.
Parts for Percussion instruments were not indicated in early music. However, the countless paintings depicting percussion of every variety attest to its use in eariy music.
LaNoue Davenport

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