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UMS Concert Program, March 1, 1965: Rosalyn Tureck --

UMS Concert Program, March 1, 1965: Rosalyn Tureck --  image UMS Concert Program, March 1, 1965: Rosalyn Tureck --  image UMS Concert Program, March 1, 1965: Rosalyn Tureck --  image UMS Concert Program, March 1, 1965: Rosalyn Tureck --  image
Day
1
Month
March
Year
1965
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Season: Eighty-sixth
Concert: Eighth
Complete Series: 3464
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan

1964 Eighty-sixth Season 196S
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Charles A. Sink, President Gail VV. Rector, Executive Director Lester McCoy, Conductor
Eighth Program Eighty-sixth Annual Choral Union Series Complete Series 3464
Rosalyn Tureck
Pianist
Monday Evening, March 1, 1965, at 8:30 Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan
PROGRAM
Compositions of Johann Sebastian Bach
Prelude and Fugue on the name of B A C H
Capriccio on a Departing Brother
Friends gather and try to dissuade him from departure
They picture the dangers which may befall him
The friends' lament
Since he cannot be dissuaded, they say farewell
Aria of the Postilion
Fugue in imitation of the Postilion's horn
French Overture
Overture Sarabande
Courante Bourree 1 and 2
Gavotte 1 and 2 Gigue
Passepied 1 and 2 Echo
INTERMISSION
Three Two-Part Inventions
C major
E minor
F major
Two Sinfonias
F minor
B minor
Italian Concerto
Allegro
Andante
Presto
Steinway Piano Odeon, Londoi
ARS LONGA VITA BREVIS
PROGRAM NOTES
Prelude and Fugue on the Name of BACH
The majestic character of the Prelude and Fugue on the name of Bach forms a fitting tribute to the great name which the subject of the Fugue spells out in the German termin?ology--BACH--b-fiat, a, c, b natural. The authorship of this work is not certain. Spitta believes that it is a youthful work of Bach himself. There is no doubt that the work contains passages and figures similar to other compositions by Bach. In my opinion it is either an early work or one sketched out by Bach and finished by one of his pupils.
Capriccio on a Departing Brother
This piece of program music, unique for Bach, was composed when he was nineteen, on the occasion of his brother's departure for Sweden to join the Swedish Guard. In the first three movements, the work is naive in its descriptive figuration, viz.: the pleading figure in the first movement where friends attempt to persuade the departing one to stay; the sighing, lovely figure of the Lament in the third movement. The title of the second movement leads one to expect some fearful figure evoking an image of formidable dangers, but the actual musical motive is indeed mild enough. It is no wonder at all that the traveller is neither frightened nor dissuaded from departure. The imitative structure in which this move?ment is written produces a piling on and insistence of the same motive, which descriptively may be regarded as the cumulative voices of friends' warning, and thus, the search for a programmatic fulfillment in this movement may be satisfied. The mood changes decisively with the fourth movement, and remains brilliant and gay to the end. Naivete vanishes in the Fugue. Here Bach combines the descriptive elements with the abstract form, creating a fugue which is a perfect little masterpiece, remarkable for its structural and contrapuntal facility.
French Overture (Partita in B minor)
The Overture is in the traditional style--a majestic opening with its dotted rhythms, an enormous central fugal section, complete with subject and countersubject fully developed and episodic material appearing in three sections contrasting with the main fugal material, and a return to the same or similar opening sections, in this case, similar.
The Courante is in the French style in 32 time, melodic but punctuated with ornamenta?tion and short ornamental figures. Two Gavottes follow, the first with a tender melody in B minor; the second contrasts with it not only in key, D major, but it is written mostly in a low dark register. The da capo indication requires the return to Gavotte I completing the Gavotte circle and returning to the tonic key. The gay Passepieds continue the da capo treatment and the change from minor to major; this time, however, Passepied II is set in B major. The Sarabande expresses one of Bach's most elevated moods. Almost hidden in the moving melodic lines is the frequent imitation in the soprano and bass parts of the opening figure which sustains the basic rhythm of the Sarabande form.
The two Bourrees retain the tonic minor key, the second forming the contrast to the more straightforward first by being one of the most exquisite little virtuoso pieces Bach ever wrote. The return to Bourree I with its simpler patterns restores the rhythmic equilibrium, setting the stage for the entrance of the long graceful line of the Gigue with its subtle rhythms.
This is not a jolly English jig, nor an extended contrapuntal masterpiece in fugal style, nor a brilliant end piece. It is a type which one occasionally meets (as in the French Suite in C minor) in his music, expressing the utmost grace rather than brilliance or the more usual strong rhythms. It is not lacking, however, in its moments of subtle vivacity.
The Echo is a brilliant play in dynamic contrasts and echo effects. The "echo" occurs more often in varying types of figures and lengths of sections than in straightforward imitations of figures. Although most of the previous movements are delicate, with this movement the work ends in a mood of gaiety and brilliance.
Three Two-part Inventions
The original manuscript of the Two and Three-part Inventions contains Bach's own words on his aims and intentions in composing these works. The C-major Invention is known by everyone who has had elementary lessons on the piano. But its charming contrapuntal form is, no doubt, less widely known by those who simply learn the notes. The visual simplicity of the score and the simple technical requirements belie the art hidden in the innocent appearance of this fragile Invention.
The Invention in E minor is one of the more extended forms among these two-part pieces. The second half of its subject forms, as often happens, a cadence to the dominant as well as a countersubject. Extension is the main composing device here. The beautiful lyric subject is continually succeeded by itself in harmonic sequences, emerging as a long singing line.
The Invention in F major is one of the most popular of all. This small work with its irresistible rhythmic flow is composed mostly in canon. Divided into three main sections, the first and third sections are uninterrupted canonic structures. The second section, a short devel?opment, introduces a figure based on the seventh, which enables the contrapuntal motives to make harmonic departures from the tonic and dominant. The following sequences return to the dominant from which point the canon commences again, continuing to the end.
Two Sinfonias
All musicians who study seriously this tender and mysterious work (Sinfonia in F minor) agree that it is one of Bach's masterpieces. The Sinfonias are perhaps more popularly known as the Three-part Inventions and these are regarded as study pieces. But Bach's inspiration was never damped in writing his "little" pieces; in fact, some theorists claim it was stimulated in writing music connected with some study interest. This Sinfonia is composed with distinct motifs in three part counterpoint. Its chromaticism lifts it from the realm of the enclosed tonal system into our contemporary musical style.
The B-minor Sinfonia departs from the more usual contrapuntal treatment which Bach employed in this form. Although it is composed in three voices, the subject and countersubject, appearing always together, are presented in only two voices throughout the work. Also, the third formal entry of the subject does not occur at all in the opening section. The third bar introduces a vivid, brilliant figuration, which is clearly episodic material, but this figuration forms all the main episodic transitions and creates a brilliant individual character for the entire Sinfonia. A dramatic organ point and fermata suspend the flow towards the end, and are followed by a flourish of figuration. The subject is then returned re-establishing the ordered framework of this form. But always there is the sense that this piece is reaching out to a big form, although composed here in miniature.
Italian Concerto
A concerto for solo instrument, the basis of its form is that of the solo concerto with orchestra. The contrast of solo and tutti in the first movement is a clear imitation of orchestral and solo sections. The second movement, a typical cantilena and ornamental figuration for solo instrument, is perfectly integrated in its form. Composed in two parts, the second part is more richly ornamented and improvisational, striking at the outset a mood of passionate urgency, which in the end drops from a climax to a coda that resolves the form and mood as a whole. Yet, because the last note occurs on an upbeat and the interval 'of the third, there is a quality of suspension which irresistibly leads into the third movement. Here, as in the first movement, the orchestral and solo sections exist, but with less emphasis on the division of these sections. The work forms an integrated whole rather than a series of movements. Both formally and instrumentally, this solo concerto is a brilliant tour de force.
MAY FESTIVAL
67 e q
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL CONCERTS
PROGRAMS
THURSDAY, MAY 6, 8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor
LEONTYNE PRICE, Soprano
PROGRAM Overture to Der Freischutz.....Weber
Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major,
Op. 60.........Beethoven
Concert aria, "Delia mia fiamma ? . . Mozart "Ernani involami" from Ernani .... Verdi
Leontvne Price Suite from "The Firebird" .... Stravinsky
FRIDAY, MAY 7, 8:30 P.M.
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
YOUTH CHORUS
JANICE HARSANYI, Soprano
MAUREEN FORRESTER, Contralto
MURRAY DICKIE, Tenor
ANSHEL BRUSILOW, Violin
JOSEPH de PASQUALE, Viola
PROGRAM Overture to 11 Seraglio......Mozart
Spring Symphony--for Chorus, Soprano,
Contralto, Tenor, and Youth Chorus . Britten University Choral Union, Youth Chorus,
and Soloists Sinfonia Concertante in E-flat major for
Violin and Viola, K. 364.....Mozart
SATURDAY, MAY 8, 2:30 P.M. WILLIAM SMITH, Conductor SAMUEL MAYES, Violoncello
PROGRAM Suite from the opera Alcina .... Handel
"Schelomo"--Hebrew Rhapsody for
Violoncello and Orchestra.....Bloch
Samuel Mayes
Symphony No. 8 in G major, Op. 88 . Dvorak
SATURDAY, MAY 8, 8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor CESARE SIEPI, Bass-Baritone
PROGRAM Symphony No. 30 in D major, K. 202 . Mozart
Concert aria, "Per quests bella mano" . Mozart
Es ist genug.......Mendelssohn
La Procession.........Fhanck
Three Don Quichotte Songs.....Ravel
Cesare Siepi
Pastorale .........Stravinsky
Pictures at an Exhibition . Moussorcsky-Ravel
SUNDAY, MAY 9, 2:30 P.M.
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor THE UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION
YOUTH CHORUS
MAUREEN FORRESTER, Contralto
MURRAY DICKIE, Tenor
PROGRAM Les Amants magnifiques......JotrvET
Poeme de l'amour et de la mer . . Chausson Maureen Forrester
Te Deum...........Beklioz
University Choral Union, Youth Chorus, and Murray Dickie
SUNDAY, MAY 9, 8:30 P.M.
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor SVIATOSLAV RICHTER, Pianist
PROGRAM Overture to Egmont......Beethoven
Concerto in A minor, Op. 16, for Piano and Orchestra.........Grieg
SVIATOSLAV RlCHTER
Symphony No. 5, Op. 47 ... Shostakovich
Season tickets: $25.00--$20.00--$16.00--512.00--9.00
(Beginning tomorrow, any remaining tickets will be placed on sale for single concerts). Prices $5.00 (sold out)--$4.50--$4.00--$3.50--$3.00--$2.50--$1.50
Robert Merrill, Baritone........Friday, March 12
National Ballet of Canada.......Saturday, April 3
Marian Anderson, Contralto......Wednesday, April 14
Tickets: $4.50--$4.00--$3.50--$3.00--$2.25--$1.50
For tickets and information, address UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, Burton Tower

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