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UMS Concert Program, February 26,1967: Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra --

UMS Concert Program, February 26,1967: Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra --  image UMS Concert Program, February 26,1967: Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra --  image UMS Concert Program, February 26,1967: Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra --  image UMS Concert Program, February 26,1967: Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra --  image
Day
26
Month
February
Year
1967
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University Musical Society
OCR Text

Season: Eighty-eighth
Concert: Fourth
Complete Series: 3551
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan

1966 Eighty-eighth Season 1967
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Charles A. Sink, President Gail W. Rector, Executive Director Lester McCoy, Conductor
Fourth Program Twenty-first Annual Extra Series Complete Series 3SS1
Seventh program in the Sesquicentennial year of The University of Michigan
Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra
STANISLAW SKROWACZEWSKI, Conductor
Sunday Afternoon, February 26, 1967, at 2:30 Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan
PROGRAM Overture to Euryanthe..........Weber
Symphony No. 3 in D major........Schubert
Adagio maestoso; allegro con brio Allegretto Menuetto
Presto vivace
Concerto for Percussion and Orchestra .... Ross Lee Finney Soloists: Robert Tweedy; Elliot Fine; Marvin Dahlgren; Philip Brunelle
INTERMISSION
Symphony No. 10 in E minor.....Dmitri Shostakovich
Moderato Allegro
Allegretto; largo; allegretto Andante; allegro
The Steinway is the official piano of the University Musical Society ARS LONG A VITA BREVIS
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS
All presentations are at 8:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted.
Jose Greco Dance Company......Wednesday, March 8
Shirley Verrett, Mezzo-soprano.....Monday, March 13
Jacqueline Du Pre, Cellist and
Stephen Bishop, Pianist (sold out) .... Monday, March 20
Stockholm University Chorus......Thursday, April 6
Boston Symphony Orchestra......Saturday, April 8
Boston Symphony Chamber Players (sold out) (2:30) Sunday, April 9
Tickets: $5.00--$4.50--$4.00--$3.50--$2.50--$1.50
ANN ARBOR MAY FESTIVAL-April 22, 23, 24, 25, 1967
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL CONCERTS
PROGRAMS
SATURDAY, APRIL 22, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. GALINA VISHNEVSKAYA, Russian soprano, in arias from Eugen Onegin (Tchaikovsky) ; Katerina Ismailova (Shostakovich) ; Aida (Verdi); Puccini's Manon Lescaut and La Boheme. "Clock" Symphony (Haydn); and Concerto for Orchestra (Bartok).
SUNDAY, APRIL 23, 2:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, Cellist, in Dvorak Con?certo. Vivaldi "Magnificat" with University Choral Union. VERONICA TYLER, So?prano; and MILDRED MILLER, Contralto. Also, Choral Union in world premiere of "The Martyr's Elegy" (Finney), with WALDIE ANDERSON, Tenor.
SUNDAY, APRIL 23, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. VAN CLIBURN, Pianist, in Brahms Concerto No. 2; "Haffner" Symphony (Mozart); New England Triptych (Schuman); Suite No. 2 from "Daphnisand Chloe" (Ravel).
MONDAY, APRIL 24, 8:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. Verdi "Manzoni" Requiem with University Choral Union; GALINA VISHNEVSKAYA, Soprano; MILDRED MILLER, Contralto; GIUSEPPI CAMPORA, Tenor; and EZIO FLAGELLO, Bass.
TUESDAY, APRIL 25, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. All-Brahms Orchestral concert; "Academic Festival" Overture; Symphony No. 1 and Symphony No. 3.
Series Tickets: $25.00--$20.00--$16.00--$12.00--$9.00 Single Concerts: $6.00--$5.50--$5.00--$4.00--$3.00--$2.00
FAIR LANE FESTIVAL--June and July, on the Dearborn Campus of the University of Michigan. Ten concerts by Baroque Orchestra of Chicago Symphony; Bath Festival Orchestra; National Festival Orchestra of Stratford; and two Britten operas, "Curlew River" and "The Burning Fiery Furnace." Complete programs and artist listing with ticket prices, available about March 10.
For tickets and information, address UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Prefacing the Concerto are meticulous diagrams that explain how the percussion and accompanying instruments are to be placed on stage. The four soloists are assigned the following complex of instruments:
Percussion 1: 4 timpani and tube bells.
Percussion 2: marimba, large bass drum, gong, hi hat, 2 plate cymbals and also sus?pended cymbal, alto triangle, large tambourine, large snare drum, glass chimes, 5 temple blocks and 2 wood blocks.
Percussion 3: xylophone, 4 torn toms, contrabass tarn tam, 3 cow bells, soprano tri?angle, alto snare drum, large suspended cymbal and 2 wood blocks.
Percussion 4: vibraphone, glockenspiel, small bass drum, bass tam tam, small snare drum, small tambourine, 3 bongo drums, wood chimes, soprano sus?pended cymbal, sizzle suspended cymbal, large triangle and 2 wood blocks.
Finney once remarked that he never writes a note without first forming his ideas clearly in his mind. The procedures underlying the Concerto for Percussion and Orches?tra are described by the composer:
"In the Concerto, as in Three Studies in Fours, the divisional sections and pro?portions are all established from the basic series. A horizon note permits the formula?tion of one set of numbers, while interval sizes within the series create yet another. These two numerical sets are combined into ratios which generate the temporal divi?sions, tempi and the intervals to be used by the percussion within individual sections. The orchestra is less bound by this procedure, fa more melodic and more concerned with spacing, climaxes and color. Thus the orchestra is differentiated from the percussion soloists as is desirable in a concerto."
Symphony No. 10 in E minor.....Dmitri Shostakovitch
When Shostakovitch commented on this symphony at the Union of Soviet Composers a few months after its premiere, he disappointed the audience with his evasive remarks as to its meaning: "Authors like to say of themselves, 'I tried, I wanted to, etc' But I think I'll refrain from any such remarks. It would be much more interesting for me to know what the listener thinks and to hear his remarks. One thing I will say: in this composition I wanted to portray human emotions and passions."
Shostakovitch is one of the few giants among modern symphonists, and his works communicate an epic quality and dimension stemming from the Beethoven-Mahler tra?dition. He writes his scores directly for orchestra; the orchestral timbres are intrinsic?ally associated with his original melodic ideas, many of which stride over a broad range. His structures are traditional, and his dissonances and chromaticism are fitted firmly within the realm of tonality.
Moderalo. A ponderous six-note motto-theme emerges from the cellos and basses at the beginning, suggesting the breadth and expansiveness to come. Contrasting with this are a lyric strain in the clarinet and a nostalgic waltz theme that dances through the exposition. These ideas contend with each other in the dramatic development and are revived in the condensed recapitulation.
Allegro. The violent scherzo explodes with a burst of energy that never wanes. All its motives contribute to a unified impression of force and destruction.
Allegretto. This reflective movement seems to function as the philosophical core of the symphony, with motivic references to the preceding movements. Its central ideas are a narrative theme, treated contrapuntally, and a noble horn call, expanded in the meditative middle section which Shostakovitch referred to as a nocturne.
Andante; allegro. After a suspended introduction, through which sounds an exotic, oriental plaint of the oboe, the finale resolves the inner conflicts of the work in music that is by turns joyous and fierce. The motto theme from the opening erupts in the orchestral controversy, and the symphony ends in a triumphant conclusion in E major.
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL PRESENTATIONS
All presentations are at 8:30 p.m. unless otherwise noted.
REMAINING PERFORMANCES, Second Semester
in Hill Auditorium
Aetur Rubinstein, Pianist......2:30, Sunday, March S
Jose Greco Dance Company......Wednesday, March 8
Shirley Verrett, Mezzo-soprano.....Monday, March 13
Stockholm University Chorus......Thursday, April 6
Boston Symphony Orchestra......Saturday, April 8
Tickets: $5.00--$4.50--$4.00--$3.50--$2.50--1.50
ANN ARBOR MAY FESTIVAL-April 22, 23, 24, 25, 1967
THE PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA AT ALL CONCERTS PROGRAMS
SATURDAY, APRIL 22, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. GALINA VISHNEVSKAYA, Russian soprano, in arias from Eugen Onegin (Tchaikovsky); Katerina Ismailova (Shostakovich); Aida (Verdi); Puccini's Manon Lescaut and La Boheme. "Clock" Symphony (Haydn); and Concerto for Orchestra (Bartok).
SUNDAY. APRIL 23, 2:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. MSTISLAV ROSTROPOVICH, Cellist, in Dvorak Con?certo. Vivaldi "Magnificat" with University Choral Union. VERONICA TYLER, So?prano; and MILDRED MILLER, Contralto. Also, Choral Union in world premiere of "The Martyr's Elegy" (Finney), with WALDIE ANDERSON, Tenor.
SUNDAY, APRIL 23, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. VAN CLIBURN, Pianist, in Brahms Concerto No. 2; "Haffner" Symphony (Mozart); New England Triptych (Schuman); Suite No. 2 from "Daphnis and Chloe" (Ravel).
MONDAY, APRIL 24, 8:30
THOR JOHNSON, Conductor. Verdi "Manzoni" Requiem with University Choral Union; GALINA VISHNEVSKAYA, Soprano; MILDRED MILLER, Contralto; GIUSEPPI CAMPORA, Tenor; and EZIO FLAGELLO, Bass.
TUESDAY, APRIL 25, 8:30
EUGENE ORMANDY, Conductor. All-Brahms Orchestral concert; "Academic Festival" Overture; Symphony No. 1 and Symphony No. 3.
Series Tickets: $25.00--$20.00--$16.00--$12.00--$9.00 (now on sale). Single Concerts: $6.00--$5.50--$5.00--$4.00--$3.00--$2.00 (on sale beginning March 1).
FAIR LANE FESTIVAL--June and July, on the Dearborn Campus of the University of Michigan. Ten concerts by Baroque Orchestra of Chicago Symphony; Bath Festival Orchestra; National Festival Orchestra of Stratford; and two Britten operas, "Curlew River" and "The Burning Fiery Furnace." Complete programs and artist listing with ticket prices, available about March 10.
For tickets and information, address UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY, Burton Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan

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