Press enter after choosing selection

UMS Concert Program, June 29 And 30: The Canadian Brass --

UMS Concert Program, June 29 And 30: The Canadian Brass --  image UMS Concert Program, June 29 And 30: The Canadian Brass --  image
Day
29
Month
June
Year
1985
Download PDF
Rights Held By
University Musical Society
OCR Text

Power Center For The Performing Arts Ann Arbor, Michigan

Arbor
nn mmer '
]stiz)al
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
presents
The Canadian Brass
Frederic Mills, Trumpet Ronald Romm, Trumpet
Martin Hackleman, French Horn Eugene Watts, Trombone
Charles Daellenbach, Tuba
Saturday and Sunday, June 29 and 30, 1985, at 8:00
Power Center for the Performing Arts
Ann Arbor, Michigan
PROGRAM
Trumpet Sonata..............................................Henry Purcell
Five Dances................................................Tielman Susato
Canzone No. 4...........................................Giovanni Gabrieli
arr. Page
Toccata ..............................................Giroiamo Frescobaldi
arr. Mills
Jazz Suite............................................arr. Luther Henderson
Prelude No. 2 from The WellTempered Clavier, Vol. I Contrapunctus No. 9 from The Art of the Fugue Prelude No. 8 from The WellTempered Clavier, Vol. I Fugue No. 2 from The WellTempered Clavier, Vol. I
INTERMISSION
Caprice No. 24.............................................Nicolo Paganini
arr. Dale Fawcett
The Marriage of Figg, R. O.....................................Ray Pannell
Little Fugue in G minor..........................................J. S. Bach
arr. Romm
About the Artists
Throughout the musical world The Canadian Brass has steadily gained a reputation for forging new paths into the uncharted areas of music for brass. Faced with a literature that included only a handful of great works for brass when they came together in 1970. these pioneers in the field of brass ensembles have become unabashed transcribers of music from all eras. Internationally re?nowned for their "brilliant virtuosity and ensemble playing of remarkable unanimity," they have been heard in concerts across Canada and the United States, as well as in Europe, Israel, Japan. Saudi Arabia, the Soviet Union, and China. Indeed, they were the first Western musical ensemble to cross the Chinese border when, in 1977, they were chosen to tour the People's Republic of China in a cultural exchange progam arranged by then Prime Minister of Canada Pierre Trudeau.
In the United States, The Canadian Brass has appeared with the New York Pops and Skitch Henderson at Carnegie Hall, with the Philadelphia Pops and Peter Nero at the Academy of Music, with the Detroit Symphony Orchestra, the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra, the Milwaukee Sym?phony Orchestra, the Denver Symphony, and the Minnesota Orchestra.
Summers are always busy for The Canadian Brass. In 1983 they participated in the opening ceremonies of the new 70,000seat B. C. Place Stadium in Vancouver and performed at the Edmon?ton Commonwealth Stadium before Prince Charles and Princess Diana and 60,000 fans. Last sum?mer they appeard at a number of music festivals, including Meadow Brook, Caramoor, New York's Mostly Mozart, and at the Hollywood Bowl.
The Brass's recordings range from "The Canadian Brass Plays Great Baroque Music" to "The Village Band." Two recent albums -"Champions" and "Brass in Berlin" -are the result of a trip to Germany for a joint session with the Berlin Philharmonic Brass. Their latest album is "Cana?dian Brass Live in Concert." The group's 24karat goldplated matched instruments are specially designed and crafted by the late Renold Schilke of Chicago.
On television the ensemble was viewed by an international audience in 1983 during the opening of Universiade, the World University Games, and has been seen on such diverse TV programs as Camera 3, The Today Show, Sesame Street, the Bravo Cable Network, with Johnny Carson on The Tonight Show, and on PBS with John Williams and the Boston Pops.
The Brass's attitude toward their music and their unique performance style is perhaps best summed up by Charles Daellenbach: "It's important to us that people get involved in the music. We feel a responsibility to see to it that the audience has fun. A good performance isn't enough -people have to go out feeling happy."

Download PDF