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Nerd Nite #42 - Prostitutes, Politicians, and Pornography: The History of Ann Arbor’s Red Light District

Tue, 05/16/2017 - 10:02am

When: February 16, 2017 at Live! 102 S. First St.

There was a time in Ann Arbor’s history when the Fourth Avenue area of downtown was known as the red light district. Lined with prostitutes, adult bookstores and massage parlors, Ann Arbor’s red light district was presided over by the Pied Piper of Porn, Terry Whitman Shoultes. Take a trip into the seedy underbelly of Ann Arbor’s dirty past.

Learn more about this topic in the AADL Old News Archives.

About Rich Retyi and Brian Peters: These gents produce Ann Arbor Stories, a podcast featuring stories from Ann Arbor’s distant and not so distant past. Rich runs digital and social media strategy for the University of Michigan hospitals and enjoys writing, playing with his kids, and Friday beers. Brian is the Operating Officer for Ghostly International, a multi-platform cultural curator and record label, as well as co-owner of local indie label, Quite Scientific; he enjoys fishing, camping, mustard, and surprise surprise – Friday beers.

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February 16, 2017 at Live! 102 S. First St.

Length: 00:20:17

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

Related Event: Nerd Nite Ann Arbor presented by AADL at LIVE 102 S First St.

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Subjects
Local History
Local Business
History
Ann Arbor
Nerd Nite

Nerd Nite #42 - Time Traveling Vikings: Or, the many layered subgenres of romance novels

Tue, 05/16/2017 - 10:02am

When: February 16, 2017 at Live! 102 S. First St.

Within the romance genre there are dozens of subgenres, some well known, some very unknown. Most people can name a few – contemporary, historical, or paranormal for example. Some people have even heard of Amish romance, westerns, or Highlanders. This talk isn’t about any of those. It’s about the subgenres that almost no one’s heard of, the time-traveling Viking romances that we never knew we were missing.

About Celia Mulder: She is a first-year Masters student at the University of Michigan's School of Information. She happens to be a huge romance fan but she honestly can’t tell you what her favorite book is, there are just too many. In addition to reading the smutty stuff, she writes it too.

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February 16, 2017 at Live! 102 S. First St.

Contains explicit content

Length: 00:24:32

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

Related Event: Nerd Nite Ann Arbor presented by AADL at LIVE 102 S First St.

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Subjects
Publishing
Live Performance
Books & Authors
Nerd Nite

Culinary Historian Andrew Coe Discusses His Book: "A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression"

Thu, 04/27/2017 - 3:45pm

When: May 21, 2017 at Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

The giddy optimism of post-World War I America came crashing down during the Depression, which radically altered eating habits, as author Andrew Coe describes in his new cultural history A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression. This book, coauthored with Jane Ziegelman, was awarded the 2017 James Beard Foundation Book Award for nonfiction.

Despite President Herbert Hoover’s 1931 claim that “nobody is actually starving,” Americans, in cities and rural areas alike, existed on subsistence diets and the effects of vitamin deficiencies were felt long into the war years.

A Square Meal is an in-depth exploration of the greatest food crisis the nation has ever faced-the Great Depression-and how it transformed America's culinary culture. Join us for a stimulating learning opportunity about this historic upheaval and the shifting role of governmental aid in response.

Andrew Coe is a writer and independent scholar specializing in culinary history. He and his wife, Jane Ziegelman, are co-authors of "A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression." His ground-breaking Chop Suey: A Cultural History of Chinese Food in the United States was a finalist for a James Beard award and named one of the best food books of the year by the Financial Times. He has written books, articles, and blog posts on everything from the ancient history of foie gras to the secret criminal past of chocolate egg creams to where to buy the tastiest bread in New York City. He has appeared in documentaries such as the National Geographic Channel's "Eat: The Story of Food" and "The Search for General Tso." He and his wife live Brooklyn with their two children.

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May 21, 2017 at Downtown Library: 4th Floor Meeting Room

Length: 00:41:13

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

Related Event: James Beard Foundation Book Award Winner Andrew Coe Discusses His Book: "A Square Meal: A Culinary History of the Great Depression"

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Subjects
History
Health & Wellness
Food & Cooking
Books & Authors
American Cultures
Agriculture

Tools Crew Live: Mogi Grumbles - Library Jam 2

Mon, 04/24/2017 - 3:09pm

When: February 28, 2017 at Downtown Library Secret Lab

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February 28, 2017 at Downtown Library Secret Lab

Length: 00:04:46

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

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Tools Crew Live: Mogi Grumbles - Library Jam 1

Mon, 04/24/2017 - 2:59pm

When: February 28, 2017 at Downtown Library Secret Lab

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February 28, 2017 at Downtown Library Secret Lab

Length: 00:04:09

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

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Tools Crew Live: Bill Van Loo - A Night at the Library

Mon, 04/24/2017 - 2:53pm

When: January 4, 2017 at Downtown Library Secret Lab

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January 4, 2017 at Downtown Library Secret Lab

Length: 00:07:35

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

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Tools Crew Live: Bill Van Loo - Downtown Guitar Improvisation

Mon, 04/24/2017 - 2:37pm

When: January 4, 2017 at Downtown Library Secret Lab

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January 4, 2017 at Downtown Library Secret Lab

Length: 00:09:35

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

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AACHM Oral History: Phase Four of the Living Oral History Project

Fri, 03/31/2017 - 5:31pm

When: 2017

Compilation video from Phase Four of the Living Oral History Project, in collaboration with the Ann Arbor District Library and the African American Cultural and Historical Museum of Washtenaw County. With Fred Adams, Audrey Lucas, Chuck Morris, Nelson Freeman, Johnnie Rush, and Janice Thompson.

Washtenaw Reads 2017 Author Event: Kathryn J. Edin & H. Luke Shaefer, Authors of "$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America"

Tue, 03/28/2017 - 3:10pm

When: February 7, 2017 at Rackham Auditorium 915 E. Washington St. Ann Arbor

Hundreds of community members throughout Washtenaw County read and discussed the award-winning book $2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America by Kathryn J. Edin & H. Luke Shaefer, which was selected as the Washtenaw Reads in September 2016 by a panel of community judges.

About the book:
After two decades of groundbreaking research on American poverty, Kathryn Edin noticed something she hadn’t seen before — households surviving on virtually no income, a level of destitution so deep as to be unthought-of in the world’s most advanced capitalist economy. Edin teamed with Luke Shaefer, an expert on surveys of the incomes of the poor, to discover that the number of American families living on $2.00 per person, per day, has skyrocketed to 1.5 million American households, including about 3 million children.

The result of their investigative teamwork is this book, which received much critical acclaim. "$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America" won the prestigious Hillman Prize for Book Journalism by the Sidney Hillman Foundation, was short-listed for the J. Anthony Lukas Book Prize by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism and the Nieman Foundation and was named a New York Times Notable Book and a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice.

About the authors:
Kathryn J. Edin, the Bloomberg Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Public Health at Johns Hopkins University, is the coauthor of "Promises I Can’t Keep: Why Poor Women Put Motherhood Before Marriage" and "Making Ends Meet: How Single Mothers Survive Welfare and Low-Wage Work." H. Luke Shaefer, Ph.D. is an associate professor at the University of Michigan School of Social Work and Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, where he studies poverty and social welfare policy in the United States.. He is an elected member of the National Academy of Social Insurance, and received the 2013 Early Career Achievement Award, given by the Society for Social Work and Research.

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February 7, 2017 at Rackham Auditorium 915 E. Washington St. Ann Arbor

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

Related Event: Washtenaw Reads 2017 Author Event: Kathryn J. Edin & H. Luke Shaefer, Authors of "$2.00 a Day: Living on Almost Nothing in America"

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Subjects
Social Issues
Politics & Government
Economy
Books & Authors

City of Ann Arbor 2017 Sustainable Ann Arbor Forum: Grow Your Own

Mon, 03/27/2017 - 2:16pm

When: April 13, 2017 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

The conversation on sustainability in Ann Arbor continued as the City and the Ann Arbor District Library hosted their annual Sustainable Ann Arbor series. The series of four events each focused on a different element of sustainability from Ann Arbor’s Sustainability Framework.

The final event in this series was Grow Your Own. Local gardening experts shared tips and tricks to help you grow your own fruits, veggies, flowers, and more. Panelists included:

Jason Frenzel, Ann Arbor City Councilmember
Monica Milla, Master Gardener
Drew Lathin, General Manager of Creating Sustainable Landscapes, LLC
Caitlyn Dickinson, Biodynamic Beekeeper

Emily Springfield, Founder of Preserving Traditions

The forums offer an opportunity to learn more about sustainability in the community and tips for actions that residents can take to live more sustainably. A think tank of local stakeholders including representatives from community organizations, and staff from both the City of Ann Arbor and Washtenaw County join the public to discuss local sustainability efforts and challenges in our community.

This event was cosponsored by the City of Ann Arbor and details of the series are posted online on The City of Ann Arbor's Sustainability site. For information and videos from current and past Sustainable Ann Arbor Forums, please visit the City’s Sustainability website.

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April 13, 2017 at Downtown Library: Multi-Purpose Room

Length: 01:23:46

Copyright: Creative Commons (Attribution, Non-Commercial, Share-alike)

Rights Held by: Ann Arbor District Library

Related Event: City of Ann Arbor 2017 Sustainable Ann Arbor Forum: Grow Your Own

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Subjects
Environment
Ann Arbor
Sustainable Ann Arbor