Press enter after choosing selection

Fly-Casting Class To Meet Tonight

Fly-Casting Class To Meet Tonight image
Parent Issue
Day
2
Month
April
Year
1956
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Planting Fish at Pleasant Lake, October 1938

Planting Fish at Pleasant Lake, October 1938 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 15, 1938
Caption
BASS PLANTED IN WASHTENAW LAKES: Twenty-six Washtenaw county lakes and streams were stocked with 15,000 large mouth black bass fingerlings by a State Conservation Department crew Thursday and yesterday: In the picture at the left, William Corson, Washtenaw county conservation officer, is standing between J. R. Meadows (left), and Nick O'Day, in front of the truck used to carry the fish. The picture was taken at Pleasant lake, and at the right is an interested spectator, Junior Sodt of Pleasant lake. Note that the conservation officer is equipped with a gun, following out the department's recent order to equip all its men with side-arms. In the picture at the right, Mr. Meadows is shown dumping some of the small fry into Pleasant lake.

J. R. Meadows Plants Largemouth Bass In Pleasant Lake, October 1938

J. R. Meadows Plants Largemouth Bass In Pleasant Lake, October 1938 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 15, 1938
Caption
BASS PLANTED IN WASHTENAW LAKES: Twenty-six Washtenaw county lakes and streams were stocked with 15,000 large mouth black bass fingerlings by a State Conservation Department crew Thursday and yesterday: In the picture at the left, William Corson, Washtenaw county conservation officer, is standing between J. R. Meadows (left), and Nick O'Day, in front of the truck used to carry the fish. The picture was taken at Pleasant lake, and at the right is an interested spectator, Junior Sodt of Pleasant lake. Note that the conservation officer is equipped with a gun, following out the department's recent order to equip all its men with side-arms. In the picture at the right, Mr. Meadows is shown dumping some of the small fry into Pleasant lake.

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Haines of 7th St. With Big Pike, June 1937

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Haines of 7th St. With Big Pike, June 1937 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, June 26, 1937
Caption
YEAH IT'S NICE, BUT WHO IS GOING TO CLEAN IT? Mrs. Howard Haines of South Seventh St. is proud of her husband's prowess as an angler, but when he brought this eight and three-quarter pound pike home yesterday, the question immediately arose as to who was going to clean it. Judging from the above picture, Mrs. Haines doesn't relish the job. Mr. Haines caught the pike in Whitmore Lake yesterday morning, as the inland fishing season opened.

Jim Cook Fishing With Netting In Charlevoix, February 1940

Jim Cook Fishing With Netting In Charlevoix, February 1940 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 3, 1940
Caption
MINNOWS FOR BAIT: Charlevoix is a supply center for fishermen who want bait for ice fishing. This picture was taken on the end of a dock, but most of the minnows are caught at feeding houses. These stand over the ice, and the minnows are attracted by food which is placed in the water.
Graphic for events post

Media

AACHM Oral History: Audrey Monagan

Sun, 07/21/2019 - 3:33pm

Audrey Monagan was born in Ann Arbor in 1941, and grew up in a close-knit, predominantly black neighborhood on North Fifth Ave. She remembers attending Bethel AME Church with her grandparents, spending time at the Dunbar Community Center, and helping raise her younger siblings. She attended Jones School and Pioneer High School before working for General Motors, where she was an inspector for eighteen years. Mrs. Monagan has been married to her second husband, Philip, for 48 years.

Emerson Shall Displays The 17 Pound Pike He Speared In Base Lake, January 1941

Emerson Shall Displays The 17 Pound Pike He Speared In Base Lake, January 1941 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 1, 1941
Caption
ANN ARBOR MAN GETS BIG PIKE: Emerson R. Shall, 1608 Charlton Ave., is shown with the 17-pound pike he speared Thursday in Base lake in Webster township. After fishing unsuccessfully through the ice in one spot for three hours, Shall moved to a new location and almost immediately speared the big fish, described by Conservation Officer William Corson as probably the largest pike speared in Washtenaw county in several years.

Bob Berger Displays The 9 Pound Walleye He Caught In Portage Lake, February 1941

Bob Berger Displays The 9 Pound Walleye He Caught In Portage Lake, February 1941 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, February 11, 1941
Caption
CAUGHT NINE-POUND WALLEYE: One of the largest walleyes to be caught in this section in some time was pulled out of Portage Lake Sunday afternoon by Bob Berger, 807 S. Seventh St., shown holding his catch above. The walleye weighed nine pounds, was 28 inches long and had a girth of 17 inches. The world's record length for walleyes is 35 inches. Bob caught the fish on a tip-up, using a large minnow for bait. He was fishing in the shanty of Birkett Newkirk, who helped him land the prize with a gaff-hook.