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Behind The Marquee: Episode 24 - Cinetopia 2019: Hits and Outliers

Tue, 04/16/2019 - 10:35am

Nick, Makenzie, and Nadeem discuss the 2019 Cinetopia Film Festival schedule, the anticipated hits, and a few their favorite outlying selections. And as always, they conclude with their Movie Magic Moments of the week.

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Presenting Alfred Hitchcock Presents #9 - The Long Shot

Thu, 04/11/2019 - 1:37pm

Presenting Alfred Hitchcock Presents is a podcast dedicated to examining each episode of the original "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" television series, show by show in chronological order. In this installment, Al Sjoerdsma looks at "The Long Shot," a story dealing not with who the murderer is but who the murderer murdered.

The classified ad that draws in Charlie Raymond.

 

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Presenting Alfred Hitchcock Presents #8 - Our Cook's a Treasure

Tue, 03/12/2019 - 4:41pm

Presenting Alfred Hitchcock Presents is a podcast dedicated to examining each episode of the original Alfred Hitchcock Presents television series, show by show in chronological order. In this installment, Al looks at an adaptation of a Dorothy Sayers story, “Suspicion”, offering a perfect excuse to also talk about Hitchcock’s film Suspicion.

Ethel offers a cup of cocoa to Ralph at the close of the episode.

 

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Behind The Marquee: Episode 23 - "Captain Marvel: An Indie Success Story"

Fri, 03/08/2019 - 4:20pm

Nick, Makenzie, and Nadeem discuss Captain Marvel, the latest installment in the Marvel Cinematic Universe and the latest blockbuster to follow the trend of being helmed by former indie directors. Plus, they get into the long awaited conversion of "toxic fandom" and as always, conclude with their Movie Magic Moments of the Week.

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Martin Bandyke Under Covers for March 2019: Martin Bandyke interviews Thomas Brothers, author of Help: The Beatles, Duke Ellington, and the Magic of Collaboration.

Fri, 03/08/2019 - 3:32pm

The Beatles and Duke Ellington’s Orchestra stand as the two greatest examples of collaboration in music history. Ellington’s forte was not melody―his key partners were not lyricists but his fellow musicians. His strength was in arranging, in elevating the role of a featured soloist, in selecting titles: in packaging compositions. He was also very good at taking credit when the credit wasn’t solely his, as in the case of Mood Indigo, though he was ultimately responsible for the orchestration of what Duke University musicologist Thomas Brothers calls "one of his finest achievements." If Ellington was often reluctant to publicly acknowledge how essential collaboration was to the Ellington sound, the relationship between Lennon and McCartney was fluid from the start. Lennon and McCartney "wrote for each other as primary audience." Lennon’s preference for simpler music meant that it begged for enhancement and McCartney was only too happy to oblige, and while McCartney expanded the Beatles’ musical range, Lennon did "the same thing with lyrics."

Through his fascinating examination of these two musical legends, Brothers delivers a portrait of the creative process at work, demonstrating that the cooperative method at the foundation of these two artist-groups was the primary reason for their unmatched musical success. While clarifying the historical record of who wrote what, with whom, and how, Brothers brings the past to life with a lifetime of musical knowledge that reverberates through every page, and analyses of songs from Lennon and McCartney’s Strawberry Fields Forever to Billy Strayhorn’s Chelsea Bridge.

Help! describes in rich detail the music and mastery of two cultural leaders whose popularity has never dimmed, and the process of collaboration that allowed them to achieve an artistic vision greater than the sum of their parts.

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Fellow Youths: You've Got Male

Wed, 02/27/2019 - 2:30pm

We talk (mostly over each other) about two Netflix original films: To All the Boys I've Loved Before and The Package.  We discuss the ancient art of snail mail and Ashley announces our own Oscar nomination for Best Prosthetic Genitalia.

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Behind The Marquee: Episode 22 - "Back From Sundance"

Mon, 02/18/2019 - 7:13pm

Nick, Makenzie, and Tyler discuss their experiences from the 2019 Sundance Film Festival, the best movies they saw, and as always, conclude with their Movie Magic Moments of the Week

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Behind The Marquee: Episode 21 - "Cinetopia Season Has Begun"

Tue, 02/12/2019 - 11:01am

Nick, Nadeem and Ariel give the first updates to the Cinetopia Film Festival and their favorite films in consideration so far, discuss the documentary The Biggest Little Farm, and as always conclude with their Movie Magic Moments of the Week. 

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Presenting Alfred Hitchcock Presents #7 - Breakdown

Mon, 02/11/2019 - 3:44pm

Presenting Alfred Hitchcock Presents is a podcast dedicated to examining each episode of the original "Alfred Hitchcock Presents" television series, show by show in chronological order. In this installment, Al Sjoerdsma discusses the second Hitchcock-directed episode along with Hitchcock films "Shadow of a Doubt" and "Under Capricorn," somehow managing to bring up Zane Grey more than once. Amy Cantu joins Al for a discussion that doesn't bring Zane Grey up at all. 

William Callew (Joseph Cotten) is paralyzed in his automobile.

 

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Martin Bandyke Under Covers for February 2019: Martin Bandyke interviews Chris Stamey, author of A Spy in the House of Loud: New York Songs and Stories.

Tue, 02/05/2019 - 2:20pm

Popular music was in a creative upheaval in the late 1970s. As the singer-songwriter and producer Chris Stamey remembers, “The old guard had become bloated, cartoonish, and widely co-opted by a search for maximum corporate profits, and we wanted none of it.” In A Spy in the House of Loud, he takes us back to the auteur explosion happening in New York clubs such as the Bowery’s CBGB as Television, Talking Heads, R.E.M., and other innovative bands were rewriting the rules. Just twenty-two years old and newly arrived from North Carolina, Stamey immersed himself in the action, playing a year with Alex Chilton before forming the dB’s and recording the albums Stands for deciBels and Repercussion, which still have an enthusiastic following.

A Spy in the House of Loud vividly captures the energy that drove the music scene as arena rock gave way to punk and other new streams of electric music. Stamey tells engrossing backstories about creating in the recording studio, describing both the inspiration and the harmonic decisions behind many of his compositions, as well as providing insights into other people’s music and the process of songwriting. Photos, mixer-channel and track assignment notes, and other inside-the-studio materials illustrate the stories. Revealing another side of the CBGB era, which has been stereotyped as punk rock, safety pins, and provocation, A Spy in the House of Loud portrays a southern artist’s coming-of-age in New York’s frontier abandon as he searches for new ways to break the rules and make some noise.

Martin’s interview with Chris Stamey was recorded on August 29, 2018.