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Protesters Wreck U Building

Protesters Wreck U Building image
Parent Issue
Day
22
Month
April
Year
1972
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Student Activists Protest Nuclear Weapons, November 1984 Photographer: Cecil Lockard

Student Activists Protest Nuclear Weapons, November 1984 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 22, 1984
Caption
BAN THE BOMB: Young protestors, many of them Community High School students, staged a "die-in" at downtown Ann Arbor intersections Wednesday. Joining hands in circles in the streets, they fell to the ground, symbolically simulating death by nuclear war. They walked through the downtown area chanting: "No, no, we won't glow." Somewhere along the way, they were joined by members of other groups protesting U.S. involvement in Central America. Ann Arbor police arrested two protestors on charges of disorderly conduct.
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Legacies Project Oral History: Chuck Warpehoski

Thu, 01/16/2020 - 9:32am

Chuck Warpehoski was born in 1978 and graduated from Grinnell College with a BA in sociology. He worked in Washington D.C. for the Nicaragua Network and Latin America Solidarity Coalition before moving to Ann Arbor in 2003. He directed the Ann Arbor nonprofit organization Interfaith Council for Peace and Justice (ICPJ) for sixteen years, focusing on issues such as nuclear disarmament and affordable housing. He also served on the Ann Arbor City Council from 2012 to 2018. He and his wife Nancy Shore have two children. 

Chuck Warpehoski was interviewed by students from Skyline High School in Ann Arbor in 2015 as part of the Legacies Project.

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Legacies Project Oral History: Nancy Taylor

Thu, 01/16/2020 - 9:12am

Nancy Emmons Taylor was born in 1941 and grew up in Luxmanor, Maryland. She attended Earlham College in Richmond, Indiana. She married Thomas Taylor soon after graduating, and they had two children. She received her Masters from the University of Michigan School of Public Health. When their children had graduated from high school, the Tayors moved to London for 12 years. Thomas was the administrator of an international Quaker program and Nancy was the warden of the Quaker meeting house and ran a program for international diplomats.

Nancy Taylor was interviewed by students from Skyline High School in Ann Arbor in 2014 as part of the Legacies Project.