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Jack Newhall and Donald Sell, son of owner George W. Sell, show off the farm's new albino calf, August 1940

Jack Newhall and Donald Sell, son of owner George W. Sell, show off the farm's new albino calf, August 1940 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, August 14, 1940
Caption
ALBINO CALF BORN IN WASHTENAW COUNTY: The albino calf shown above was born Aug. 6 on the George W. Sell farm on N. Territorial Rd., Dexter township. Born to a Holstein-Durham cow, the healthy calf is pure white and has pink eyes. Showing interest in the unusual calf are Jack Newhall of Morley and Donald Sell, son of the owners of the farm. Jack is Donald's uncle and he is visiting at the farm this summer.

J.C. Bradbury's Dutch Belted Cattle, January 1938

J.C. Bradbury's Dutch Belted Cattle, January 1938 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, January 5, 1938
Caption
FEW OF THESE IN WASHTENAW: J. C. Bradbury, route 1, Dexter, shown here with a Dutch Belted cow, has one of the two herds of this unusual breed of dairy animal in Michigan and the largest herd in the state. The Dutch Belted cow was first brought to this county from Holland by P. T. Barnum of circus fame.

Darwin Downer With Set Of Triplet Lambs, April 1937

Darwin Downer With Set Of Triplet Lambs, April 1937 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 21, 1937
Caption
JUST A SPECIMEN: Many strange and wonderful things happened on the Darwin Downer farm, near Chelsea, last week and the view above is just a sample - just a smidgin, as the boys say - of what went on. Mr. Downer is shown holding one set of the six sets of lamb triplets which were born during the tremendous re-storking of his sheep herd. Six sets of lamb triplets are a lot of potential chops, but they only constituted only the first paragraph of the story. There were also 102 sets of twins. Mrs. Dionne, the thing seems to be catching.

George Henning's Cattle, November 1936

George Henning's Cattle, November 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 25, 1936
Caption
FATTENING FOR MARKET: George Henning, Salem, is one of many Washtenaw county farmers who are feeding cattle for market. Above is shown his 116 Herefords and shorthorns.

Henning Siblings and Sheep, November 1936

Henning Siblings and Sheep, November 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 25, 1936
Caption
INTRODUCING - THE ALL-'ROUND 4-H CHAMPION, HER SISTER AND BROTHER: Above are shown Margaret Henning, right, newly crowned 4-H champion of Washtenaw county, her brother Robert, and sister, Clara. They live near Salem on their father's 280-acre farm. Margaret has completed, with remarkable success, a half dozen 4-H projects and at the banquet given Washtenaw county members in the Michigan Union Monday night by the Kiwanis club she was acclaimed the All-'Round 4-H champion of the county.

Robert Mast with Prize Sheep, October 1936

Robert Mast with Prize Sheep, October 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, October 7, 1936
Caption
WIN THREE BLUE RIBBONS: Above is shown Robert Mast, Webster township, and his three Blacktop sheep with which he won three blue ribbons at the Michigan State Fair. Robert is a son of supervisor Carl Mast, and a student in Dexter high school.

Robert Mast & Sisters With Champion Sheep, September 1937

Robert Mast & Sisters With Champion Sheep, September 1937 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, September 29, 1937
Caption
SHOWING SOME CHAMPIONS: Robert Mast, 16-year-old son of Supervisor and Mrs. Carl Mast of Webster township, had some able assistance in displaying his champion yearling ewe and lamb ewe to The News photographer. The ewes, both grand champions at the Michigan State fair this year, are held by Robert, left, a member of the Scio Junior Farmers 4-H club, and his sister, Kathryn. Lending moral support is little Joan Mast, right, another sister.

Tom The Turkey Chases A Visitor On The Strieter Farm, November 1974

Tom The Turkey Chases A Visitor On The Strieter Farm, November 1974 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 27, 1974
Caption
Being a turkey is hard work these days. You have to be constantly on the lookout for strangers bearing axes and guns, who are saving a place for you on their Thanksgiving table. Thats why Tom, a pet turkey at Arwin (Bud) Strieter's farm, wasn't taking any chances. When he saw hunter Ron Knecht of Ann Arbor moseying around the barnyard, he attacked. Knecht, who had never been attacked by a turkey before, fled quickly - a little too quickly. He tripped over the dog and wound up flat on his back. The turkey was declared the winner. Incidentally, Tom really didn't have much to worry about. He'll enjoy his status as family pet for many Thanksgivings to come.