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Avard Fairbanks Sculpts A Champion Stallion, January 1939

Avard Fairbanks Sculpts A Champion Stallion, January 1939 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, January 18, 1939
Caption
MODELING CHAMPION STALLION: Avard T. Fairbanks, Ann Arbor sculptor, is shown with his nearly completed clay model of Obusier, 189153, rated the best imported stallion at the International Livestock show in Chicago last fall and owned by E. A. Hunter of Ann Arbor. The horse was added to the Dhu Varren Farms herd of outstanding Percherons last month. The clay model is to be cast in bronze and one model will be sent to Michigan State College for exhibition purposes.

Cyril Spike & Eber Baker Hold Brampton Beau at Dhu Varren Farms, December 1936

Cyril Spike & Eber Baker Hold Brampton Beau at Dhu Varren Farms, December 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, December 23, 1936
Caption
ACQUITTED OF KILLING OWNER: In a public trial, conducted with deadly seriousness, a jury of 12 men on the Isle of Jersey, acquitted the bull shown above, Brampton Beau, of killing his owner. The alternative was public execution. The bull recently arrived from the Isle by way of Chester, N. Y., at the Dhu Varren Farms, Whitmore Lake Rd., where he will remain for one year when he will be shipped back to his owner, Edmund Butler of Chester, N. Y. He is a register of merit bull. Shown holding the bull, above, are Cyril Spike, left, and Eber Baker, right, who say that the story about the former owner's death made a more lasting impression on their consciousness than the story of the Bull's acquittal for alleged complicity in the death.

Fred Notton & Yearling Bull, August 1936

Fred Notton & Yearling Bull, August 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, August 26, 1936
Caption
WILL ENTER FREE FAIR PARISH SHOW: Above is Fred Notton, widely known cattle breeder, living west of Chelsea, with the yearling bull which he will enter in the Washtenaw Free Fair parish show.

Braiding a mane, August 1936

Braiding a mane, August 1936 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, August 26, 1936
Caption
WHEREIN THE HORSE'S MANE IS BRAIDED BY AN EXPERT: Harry Moxley, specialist of Michigan State college, is shown above demonstrating to a crowd at the horse clinic on the Charles McCalla farm the art of braiding a horse's mane for show purposes. A yellow sash was used for the braiding. A row of cloth flowers gave the finishing touch.

Jack Newhall and Donald Sell, son of owner George W. Sell, show off the farm's new albino calf, August 1940

Jack Newhall and Donald Sell, son of owner George W. Sell, show off the farm's new albino calf, August 1940 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, August 14, 1940
Caption
ALBINO CALF BORN IN WASHTENAW COUNTY: The albino calf shown above was born Aug. 6 on the George W. Sell farm on N. Territorial Rd., Dexter township. Born to a Holstein-Durham cow, the healthy calf is pure white and has pink eyes. Showing interest in the unusual calf are Jack Newhall of Morley and Donald Sell, son of the owners of the farm. Jack is Donald's uncle and he is visiting at the farm this summer.

J.C. Bradbury's Dutch Belted Cattle, January 1938

J.C. Bradbury's Dutch Belted Cattle, January 1938 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, January 5, 1938
Caption
FEW OF THESE IN WASHTENAW: J. C. Bradbury, route 1, Dexter, shown here with a Dutch Belted cow, has one of the two herds of this unusual breed of dairy animal in Michigan and the largest herd in the state. The Dutch Belted cow was first brought to this county from Holland by P. T. Barnum of circus fame.

Darwin Downer With Set Of Triplet Lambs, April 1937

Darwin Downer With Set Of Triplet Lambs, April 1937 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 21, 1937
Caption
JUST A SPECIMEN: Many strange and wonderful things happened on the Darwin Downer farm, near Chelsea, last week and the view above is just a sample - just a smidgin, as the boys say - of what went on. Mr. Downer is shown holding one set of the six sets of lamb triplets which were born during the tremendous re-storking of his sheep herd. Six sets of lamb triplets are a lot of potential chops, but they only constituted only the first paragraph of the story. There were also 102 sets of twins. Mrs. Dionne, the thing seems to be catching.