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Jones School

Jones School was an anchor of Ann Arbor’s historically Black neighborhood (what is now Kerrytown) from the early twentieth century until 1965. Many living Ann Arbor residents remember attending Jones School during the Civil Rights Era. In 1964 the Ann Arbor Board of Education acknowledged that, with over 75% Black students, Jones was a “de facto” segregated school. Jones School closed in 1965, and several years later the building reopened as Community High School.

Waste Paper - Our Job

Waste Paper - Our Job image
Parent Issue
Day
1
Month
April
Year
1944
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Copyright Protected

Ration Guide

Ration Guide image
Parent Issue
Day
1
Month
April
Year
1944
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Hamburg bus purchased by Brown-McLaren Manufacturing to transport Hamburg children to Ann Arbor schools, March 1944

Hamburg bus purchased by Brown-McLaren Manufacturing to transport Hamburg children to Ann Arbor schools, March 1944 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, March 31, 1944
Caption
SCHOOL ABSENTEE PROBLEM SOLVED: When Hamburg High school students, who attend classes at Ann Arbor High school, found wartime travel restrictions making it nearly impossible to attend school, many of them dropped out and forgot about further education. Then R. C. Brown and some of his cohorts at the Brown-McLaren Manufacturing Co. in Hamburg stepped into the picture and solved the school transportation problem by purchasing a $3,300 school bus that makes the Hamburg-Ann Arbor trip daily carrying 12 Hamburg students and an extra 10 picked up at Whitmore Lake. The new bus started its runs this week but it isn't the first effect of Mr. Brown's benevolence to be felt at the Hamburg school. He also purchased a $1,000 fire escape for the school building and has made other improvements possible. Shown in the picture foreground, left to right, are Mr. Brown, the company president; Harry Andrews, treasurer; Ora Moehl, auditor, and Charles Heath.

Line-Up at Muir's During Cigarette Shortage, November 1944

Line-Up at Muir's During Cigarette Shortage, November 1944 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, November 18, 1944
Caption
BANANAS? NO. NYLONS? NO. JUST CIGARETS: Ann Arbor's shortage of cigarets is growing no better fast, if the above picture is a criterion, for this is part of a line-up of more than 50 persons who were waiting to buy cigarets at Muir's drug store on Main St. this morning when the photographer happened along. A sign on the window says "cigarets, first come, first served."
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Media

Legacies Project Oral History: Shirley (Rusty) Schumacher

Tue, 12/10/2019 - 11:03am

Shirley (Rusty) Schumacher was born in 1930 in Detroit. She remembers war bonds, scrap drives, and special manufacturing during World War II. She attended William and Mary College and received two master’s degrees in speech and education from the University of Michigan. Schumacher spent most of her career as a teacher at Clague Middle School. In 1985 she founded a student exchange program with Ann Arbor’s sister city, Hikone, Japan. She led a year-long stay there in 1992-93.

Shirley (Rusty) Schumacher was interviewed by students from Skyline High School in Ann Arbor in 2018 as part of the Legacies Project.

Mr. Burke Goes To Washington [Editorial]

Mr. Burke Goes To Washington [Editorial] image
Parent Issue
Day
20
Month
April
Year
1943
Copyright
Copyright Protected