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Rabbi Allan Kensky Explains the Significance of Passover to Children of the Beth Israel Congregation, March 1972 Photographer: Eck Stanger

Rabbi Allan Kensky Explains the Significance of Passover to Children of the Beth Israel Congregation, March 1972 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, March 29, 1972
Caption
The Symbols Of Passover Dramatizing the flight of Jews from Egypt at the time of the Exodus, Rabbi Allan Kensky explains to children of Beth Israel Congregation the symbols of Passover. Mark Lampert (left) holds the wine which symbolizes freedom, while Susan Aminoff holds a bottle of horseradish, symbolizing bitter herbs and the bitterness the Jews experienced while slaves in Egypt. Hannah Bernard (right) carries a pack of matzoh, or unleavened bread, on her back as the Jews did when they left Egypt. Kensky says the egg symbolizes spring and the matzoh, the unleavened bread. Traditionally, Kensky says, children in Sefardic Jewish families (from Spanish or Oriental descent) act out the flight from Egypt on the first night of Passover.

Dove of Peace at Temple Beth Emeth, April 1970 Photographer: Eck Stanger

Dove of Peace at Temple Beth Emeth, April 1970 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 21, 1970
Caption
'Peace Seder' Why will Wednesday night be different from all other nights? Tomorrow, at the third traditional Passover meal, a "Peace Seder" will mark the end of the anti-war vigil here. Cindy Margolis, Bill Arrieta (foreground) Rabbi Bruce S. Warshall of Temple Beth Emeth and Mrs. Russell Fuller, Interfaith Council for Peace director, prepare for the meal.

Julius Weinberg Teaches Children About Passover Seder, Beth Israel Community Center, April 1958 Photographer: Eck Stanger

Julius Weinberg Teaches Children About Passover Seder, Beth Israel Community Center, April 1958 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 4, 1958
Caption
Passover Seder: Materials for the Passover Seder are shown to four beginning students in the Hebrew school of Beth Israel Community Center by Rabbi Julius Weinberg, spiritual leader of the center. Materials for the home observance are the candelabra, used for every holiday; a cup for Elijah, who is to herald the coming of the Messianic age and signifies future redemption; the matzah cover, which contains three matsoth (unleavened bread) for the meal; the Passover plate, which reposes before the head of the household and contains items used for the Seder, and the Haggadah, a collection of narratives, poems and blessings. During the ceremony, the door is thrown open in the symbolic hope that Elijah will appear. The children are (left to right) Gail Fine, Paul Berlin, Linda Gallatin and Jonathan Veniar, who will be among those to enjoy Passover games.

Children Prepare To Take Part in Seder Meal, Beth Israel Center, March 1956 Photographer: Attributed to Eck Stanger

Children Prepare To Take Part in Seder Meal, Beth Israel Center, March 1956 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, March 24, 1956
Caption
Children Take Part In Seder Meal: Rabbi Julius Weinberg of the Beth Israel Center explains the ritual of the Seder (which means "order") meal to three of his young congregation members. Beth Israel Sunday school children will have their annual Seder meal at 10:30 a.m. tomorrow, and again on Monday and Tuesday evenings with their families. Rabbi Weinberg is showing the Haggadah, an ancient book which outlines the Passover celebration to (from left) Julian Cook, Jeffrey Ingber and Harvey Lansky.

Leslie M. Werbel Family Preparing For Seder, April 1971 Photographer: Cecil Lockard

Leslie M. Werbel Family Preparing For Seder, April 1971 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 6, 1971
Caption
Preparing For Seder Seder, a traditional dinner marking the beginning of Passover, will be observed Friday by members of Ann Arbor's Jewish community. Members of the Leslie M. Werbel family go over some of the items which are used each year during the religious holiday. From the left are Cheryl, Mrs. Werbel, Aaron and Debra. (News photo by Cecil Lockard)

Larry Rollins Arranges A Passover Food Display At Great Scott Supermarket, March 1976 Photographer: Robert Chase

Larry Rollins Arranges A Passover Food Display At Great Scott Supermarket, March 1976 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, March 28, 1976
Caption
The ready availability of kosher foods processed under rabbinical supervision, like these being arranged by Great Scott Manager Larry Rollins, has greatly simplified the observance of Passover for modern day Jews. But the intricacies of the ancient tradition of 'kashering' still provide fascination - and confusion.

Rabbi Goldstein & Stuart Sandweiss Prepare The Chabad House Kitchen Counters For Passover, April 1985 Photographer: Robert Chase

Rabbi Goldstein & Stuart Sandweiss Prepare The Chabad House Kitchen Counters For Passover, April 1985 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 5, 1985
Caption
Rabbi Goldstein, left, and Stuart Sandweiss use boiling water and hot metal to sanitize the Chabad House kitchen's counters in preparation for Passover.

Rabbi Goldstein Prepares A Chabad House Oven For Passover, April 1985 Photographer: Robert Chase

Rabbi Goldstein Prepares A Chabad House Oven For Passover, April 1985 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, April 5, 1985
Caption
Goldstein uses a blowtorch to remove even the 'taste' of leaven from a Chabad House oven