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Becoming American: A History of Native American Boarding Schools

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 12:09pm

In the 1800's, assimilation was the government's policy to work Native Americans into mainstream society.  One of the methods used was to take Native children from their homes and ship them to boarding schools.  "Save the man, Kill the Indian" was the motto used by these schools as they stripped Native children of their language, culture, and identity. 

Learn how these schools operated and what was done to help overcome this abuse.

Heather Bruegl, inspired by a trip to Wounded Knee, South Dakota, quickly developed a passion for Native American History.  Curiosity for her own heritage led her to Wisconsin, where she has researched the history of the Native American tribes of that region. Heather is a graduate of Madonna University of Michigan and holds a Bachelor of Arts and Master of Arts in U.S. History. She currently travels and lectures on Native American history, including policy and activism.

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Broadway's Mean Girls @ AADL

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 12:02pm

The stars of the Broadway smash hit Mean Girls discuss their experiences appearing on Broadway in Tina Fey’s Tony-nominated musical.  

Ann Arbor native Ashley Park (Gretchen) is joined by her fellow U-M alums Taylor Louderman (Regina) and Erika Henningsen (Cady) for this special evening.

Ashley Park received Tony, Drama League, Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle, & Chita Rivera nominations for her role as Gretchen in Mean Girls.  Her Broadway credits include the roles of Tuptim in Lincoln Center’s The King and I (Grammy nomination), Sunday in the Park With George , and Mamma Mia!  Off-Broadway credits include  the role of Mwe in KPOP (Lucille Lortel Award Winner; Drama Desk & Drama League nominations). Ashley is also featured in Tales of the City on Netflix. She was the recipient of the Actor Equity Association’s 2018 Clarence Derwent Award. 

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Of Chinese Cheese and Curds

Fri, 06/28/2019 - 11:55am

Nowadays, the Chinese are famous for their food — but not for their cheeses or for their dairy products. Scholarly and popular accounts explain this through biological and cultural factors — the prevalence of lactose intolerance and xenophobia, for example. Miranda Brown, Professor of Chinese Studies, U-M Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, challenges the popular and scholarly view through a mouthwatering tour of dishes composed of curds. Dr. Brown traces the long history of curds in China, demonstrating that such foods were regarded as delicacies by the elite, and accounts for their sudden and belated disappearance from the modern Chinese diet. The talk concludes by exploring the modern legacies of the Chinese fascination with curds.

A native of San Francisco, Miranda Brown is Professor of Chinese Studies in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Michigan, where she has taught since finishing her degree in History at UC Berkeley in 2002. She recently worked on the premodern history of dairy in China, a topic that has received little scholarly or popular attention. Her article, on the history of cheese in South China, appeared in Gastronomica: The Journal of Critical Food Studies (2019). Having been raised by a Southern Chinese mother, Brown is fascinated with all Chinese food and considers herself a serious amateur cook. 

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Nerd Nite 1/17 MRI Magic

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 1:00pm

NNA2 #61 dives into MRIs and what we can and cannot learn about the brain with neuroscience researcher Sam Carpenter, exploring how protons are structured, inside and out, with physics grad student Nicole Lewis, and talking about why we play - or don’t play - video games with Mark Kazmierski.

Sam Carpenter – MRI: Magic Really-cool Images

We often hear in the media about some new scientific study where “brain scans reveal something interesting” But often, not a lot of effort goes into describing what is meant by a “brain scan”, how they work and what they can tell us. A common method of “brain scan” is Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). I break down what an MRI is, how they work and what we can and cannot learn about the brain. 

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Nerd Nite 1/17 Why We Play Video Games

Wed, 06/26/2019 - 12:53pm

NNA2 #61 dives into MRIs and what we can and cannot learn about the brain with neuroscience researcher Sam Carpenter, exploring how protons are structured, inside and out, with physics grad student Nicole Lewis, and talking about why we play - or don’t play - video games with Mark Kazmierski.

Mark Kazmierski –  Game On! Why you do (or don’t) Play Video Games

What makes games so addictive? In a world of over-stimulation and short attention spans, what makes games the thing that we are drawn to? We will attempt to break down what keeps people playing, as well as what prevents people from getting started.

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Author Event | Cecile Richards Discusses Her Book "Make Trouble: Standing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding the Courage to Lead"

Sun, 06/23/2019 - 11:48am

Cecile Richards has been an activist since she was taken to the principal’s office in seventh grade for wearing an armband in protest of the Vietnam War. Richards had an extraordinary childhood in ultra-conservative Texas, where her civil rights attorney father and activist mother taught their kids to be troublemakers. She had a front-row seat to observe the rise of women in American politics and watched her mother, Ann, transform from a housewife to an electrifying force in the Democratic party.

As a young woman, Richards worked as a labor organizer alongside women earning minimum wage, and learned that those in power don’t give it up without a fight. She experienced first-hand the misogyny, sexism, fake news, and the ever-looming threat of violence that constantly confront women who challenge authority.

Now, after years of advocacy, resistance, and progressive leadership, she shares her “truly inspiring” (Redbook) story for the first time—from the joy and heartbreak of activism to the challenges of raising kids, having a life, and making change, all the while garnering a reputation as “the most badass feminist EVER” (Teen Vogue).

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Nerd Nite 1/17 Proton Power

Thu, 06/20/2019 - 5:57pm

NNA2 #61 dives into MRIs and what we can and cannot learn about the brain with neuroscience researcher Sam Carpenter, exploring how protons are structured, inside and out, with physics grad student Nicole Lewis, and talking about why we play - or don’t play - video games with Mark Kazmierski.

Nicole Lewis – Unpacking the Proton

Scientists have known since the 60s that the proton is made of smaller particles called quarks and gluons that are tightly bound together by the strong nuclear force.  This process is responsible for 98% percent of the mass of the visible universe.  Which would be great if we had any idea how it worked. Lewis studies proton-proton collisions that are at a high enough energy that the proton breaks up into a spray of particles.  By studying the particles that come out of this spray and how they are arranged in space, we can learn more about the internal structure of the proton.

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Kwanzaa: Elizabeth James

Thu, 06/20/2019 - 5:39pm

What is Kwanzaa? Kwanzaa is a holiday in the U.S. and other nations of the African diaspora that celebrates Pan-African heritage in African-American culture. It occurs every year from December 26 - January 1.

Elizabeth James from the U-M Afroamerican and African Studies Department presents an interactive discussion on the history and current celebration of the holiday. In her position with DAAS, James assists with the department's many programs and objectives and performs as its outreach coordinator. James was named a 2014 Harold R. Johnson Diversity Service Award recipient, Advisor of the Year by the Office of Student Affairs and has been awarded the Cornerstone Award from the Black Celebratory. 

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Aaron Foley

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 2:09pm

Aaron Foley is an author, editor, Detroit native and current resident. He is the author of the 2015 book How to Live in Detroit Without Being a Jackass and editor of the 2017 anthology "The Detroit Neighborhood Guidebook." Currently, he is the chief storyteller for the City of Detroit government. Previously, he was editor of BLAC Detroit Magazine, and a contributor to several local and national news outlets, including Jalopnik, CNN, The Atlantic, BuzzFeed and Reuters. Foley draws on a wealth of knowledge about the city and discusses his life and career through an insightful perspective that is sure to educate and entertain.

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Author Event | Barbara Barton and "Manoomin : the Story of Wild Rice in Michigan"

Tue, 06/18/2019 - 2:07pm

Manoomin: The Story of Wild Rice in Michigan is the first book of its kind to bring forward the rich tradition of wild rice in Michigan, and its importance to the Anishinaabek people who live here. The book received the 2018 Michigan History Award and 2019 Michigan Notable Book Award.

Join author Barbara Barton as she follows the threads that connect the history, culture, biology, economics, and spirituality of this sacred plant. Learn about the vast wild rice beds that once existed in Michigan, why many disappeared, and the efforts of tribal and nontribal people working to return and protect Manoomin across the landscape.