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Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Program: The Subject Was Roses, March 03, 1971

Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Program: The Subject Was Roses, March 03, 1971 image Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Program: The Subject Was Roses, March 03, 1971 image Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Program: The Subject Was Roses, March 03, 1971 image Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Program: The Subject Was Roses, March 03, 1971 image Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Program: The Subject Was Roses, March 03, 1971 image Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Program: The Subject Was Roses, March 03, 1971 image Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Program: The Subject Was Roses, March 03, 1971 image Ann Arbor Civic Theatre Program: The Subject Was Roses, March 03, 1971 image
Publisher
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
Day
3
Month
March
Year
1971
Rights Held By
Ann Arbor Civic Theatre
OCR Text

ann arbor civic theatre
TH£ SUBJ£CT WAS R0~£5
TRUEBLOOD THEATRE MARCH 3-6
John Rae has been around the theatre for a long time. His first appearance was with the Swagger Stick Players in 1932. His first show with Civic Theatre was "I Am a Camera" in 1958. He has appeared in thirty-six plays including a season in repertory with Andy Devine in "On Borrowed Time," with Julie WiIson in "Pal Joey," and with Constance Bennett, in her last play, "Oh Dad, Poor Dad, Mamma's Hung You in the Closet and I'm Feelin' So Sad." Mr. Rae is an Ann Arbor attorney, a former County Prosecutor, and for ten years was a County Supervisor. He has appeared many times with Veitch Reinhart, and says with pride that he has had more stage wives than any other Civic Theatre actor. He is enjoying working with Michael Bott because "in each show we've been in to-
gether I have had to do physical violence to him."
Veitch Reinhart's second play for AACT was "I Am a Camera" with John Rae in 1958. She is a U of M graduate with a theatre major and she has appeared in many roles with AACT. Most recently she has appeared in "Skin of our Teeth," and "Spoon River Anthology." Mrs. Reinhart is an Administrative Assistant in the Botany Department at the U of M in her spare time. For her performance in "Never Too Late" she was voted best actress of that year.
Michael Bott has a World War II haircut for this role, reminding us how styles have changed. He played "a handful of minor roles with University Players," appeared in the 1967 Alaska Centennial Show, and will be remembered from the cast of "Cactus Flower" this fall. He has also appeared with AACT in "Shot in the Dark," "Rose Tatoo," and "Spoon River Anthology."
Patricia Reilly (Director) was trained at the Goodman Theatre School in Chicago and went on to a very successful career in radio as, among many other roles, "The Second Mrs. Burton." She was seen by AACT audiences as Lady AIice in "A Man for All Seasons" for which she was named Best Actress of the 1967- 68 season. Mrs. Reilly's advice to potential directors: Take a baby picture and land a job as crying baby in a silent film "trailer" (forerunner of commericals), add ballet classes for toddlers and other assorted dancing and music lessons, win first prize in a Charleston contest circa 1927, start your education as a costume-design major and switch plans and schools in mid-stream, play two summers in Stock doubling ingenue roles with stage managing, costuming, and interior decorating the ladies' powder room, act in radio, do some coaching and and volunteer directing, add a child to the family and retire to the luxury of being a full-time housewife with hobbies and maybe they'll ask you.
Charles Stallman (Producer and Stage Manager) will be remembered by AACT audiences for his performance last spring as Felix in "The Odd Couple." This summer he produced eight shows for the workshop series. His varied career has spanned the American Shakespeare Festival in Stratford, Connecticut and the YpsiIanti Greek Theatre. After twelve Civic Theatre appearances he won the Best Actor award for the 1969-70 season.
Michael Hooker (Lighting Design) appeared in "She Stoops to Conquer" with AACT and has appeared in numerous productions at the University of Minnesota and the U of M. He was with the Michigan Repertory Company in 1969, and has designed both sets and Iights for the University Players. This is the 50th production he has worked on in the last four years.
As a regular theatre patron you probably know already that this past year has seen the formation of The Ann Arbor CounciI for the Performing Arts. No doubt you've seen our handbills, received our newsletter, or perhaps you've heard our publicity on the radio. If for some reason you haven't, or if you are uncertain about just what the council is, let us explain.
The Ann Arbor CounciI for the Performing Arts is a group composed of repre- sentatives from the seven community performing arts organizations and inter- rested individuals. We are: Ann Arbor Civic Theatre, Ann Arbor Black Theatre, Ann Arbor Civic Ballet, Ann Arbor Dance Theatre, Ann Arbor Symphony, Junior Light Opera Company, and Our Own Thing. Annual dues for interested individ- uals are $5.
Funded entirely by our own membership, we aim to strengthen community per- forming arts activities by sharing, by uniting, and by cooperating. So far we have successfully started our own central ticket office at Stanger's (307 South State). Here you may buy tickets to performances by any of our member groups. We have also started a quarterly newsletter in which we provide a calendar of the dates, times, and places of all performing arts activities.
If you haven't joined us yet, we hope you soon will. If you haven't used our ticket office at Stanger's yet, we hope you will think about it the next time you tickets to a show. And if you haven't received our quarterly newsletter and calendar yet, we hope you'll ask to be added to our mailing list. Help us so that we can help you. For information, call 761-3216. To join, send your check for $5 to Dwight W. Stevenson, Treasurer AACPA, 4391 Crestline Drive, Ann Arbor.
"In White America" weds history and drama to tell the story of what it has been like to be a Black in this country. Martin Duberman, Princeton history professor, chose the documentary play format, he says, "because I wanted to combine the evocative power of the spoken word with the confirming power of historical fact." Every word is from actual documents, fitted into scenes which are en- acted by a mixed racial cast. Its style is somewhat like "Spoon River An- thology," presented last summer by AACT. Since its premiere in 1964, "In White America" has been hailed both for its history and for its entertainment value. Director Allen Schreiber (whose last effort for AACT was "The Visit" in 1968) has promised some new angles for the production in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, April 21 -24.
AACT's next production will be Noel Coward's "Blithe Spirit" March 31-April 3 in Trueblood Theatre.
Tickets for all AACT shows are available at a ten percent reduction in price for groups of twenty-five or more.
AACT Board of Directors 1970-71
Carol Deniston, President
Sunny LaFave, Vice President Dwight Stevenson, Treasurer Jerry Scofield, Business Manager Amy Vuolo, Membership Chairman Stuart Gould
Trudy Maglott, ex officio
Zeke Jabbour James Kane Charles Stallman John Stephens John Stevens Garren Thomas
Tickets are available for AACT productions and other local attractions at the box office in Stangers Designs on South State Street.
A middle-class apartment.
Scene 1: Saturday morning
Scene 2: Saturday afternoon
Scene 3: Two a. m. Monday morning
The same place.
Act Two
Scene 1: Sunday morning
Scene 2: Sunday evening
Scene 3: Two a. m. Monday morning Scene 4: Nine a. m. Monday Morning
Director's Note:
THE SUBJECT WAS ROSES
By Frank GiIroy Directed by Patricia Reilly Cast, in order of appearance:
John Cleary .....................................................John Rae Nettie Cleary .............................................Veitch Reinhart Timmy Cleary ................................................Michael Bott
Synopsis of Scenes Act One
A relatively short time ago in the history of the theatre, it would have been unthinkable to have written and produced a full length play about three very ordinary people to whom nothing very extraordinary happens. In choosing to celebrate his love for his parents in "The Subject Was Roses," Gilroy dignifies and elevates the common man to his rightful place as worthy of our attention.
The playwright kept a journal during the pre-production period and first produc- tion, and this gives us a preview of his fastidious nature, further revealed in the craftsmanship of the play. The more familiar one becomes with the play the more impressed one is with its simplicity and excellent construction. There isn't a spare word or action yet all the play takes place in a span of forty-eight hours. The sin which threatens the structure of the family, with the son's in- sistence on truth as the catalyst, is false pride, common to all men.
This well-made play presents a real challenge to director and actor alike.
Avanti Hair Fashions Benjie Kaplan
John Kisly
SPECIAL THANKS TO:
The Petal Shop
Ann Arbor Black Theatre Edwards Jewelers The VFW
Mrs. Lila Doran
Mr. James P. Traugh
PRODUCTION ST AFF
Announcer................... . .... . .......................Laurence Coven Producer.................... . ............................Charles Stallman Production Assistants ........... . ................ Alfred Reilly, Lois Porter,
Bobbie Heminger Stage Manager............................................Charles Stallman Set Designer...............................................Chris Stephens Lighting Designer.............. . ...........................Michael Hooker Sound............................ . ......................Arthur Vuolo, Jr. Set Construction ........................Donald Stewart, Chairman, Earl Bell, Jane Cockrell, Nick Contaxes, Sue Green, Cora Greenberg, AI Podewid, Rachel Runells, Chris Stephens, John Stephens Props ................. . .............Joan Scheffler, Chairman, Peggy Burns, Berninger, Cheryl Lowe Costumes .............................Alida Silverman, Chairman, Terry Gray Barbara Small, Marcy Storer Makeup...................................Amy Vuolo, Chairman, Nancy Stys Set up and Strike ....................................Bob Seeman, Chairman Production Photos ............................................Fred Beutler Lighting Crew...................Michael Housefield, Technician, Joan Arrl ich Program Photos ...............................................Walter Ring Publicity ...............................Jim Kane, Chairman, Carren Thomas Program ...................................................Sally Springett Program Ads .................................................Helga Hover Box Office.........................................Joan Gibson, Chairman, Janet Crabtree, Helga Hover, Sharon Lee, Fran Stewart Poster Distribution ....................................Francoise Adamson, Joyce Carrapozza, Larry Coven, Carol Deniston, Helga Hover, John Rae, Ken Johnson, Veitch Reinhart, Joan Scheffler, Charles Stallman, Dwight Stevenson Ticket Agent ...............................................Jerry Scofield
PATRONS OF AACT
CLINT CASTOR'S
~illageJJjell
VISIT US BEFORE OR AFTER THE SHOW 769-1744
1321 SOUTH UNIVERSITY
STADIUM OPTICIANS, INC.
David F. Meldrum Olarles R. Meldrum MEMBERS OF THE
AMERICAN BOARD OF OPTICIANRY 2333 W. Stadium Blvd.
335 S. Main 611 Church St.
[f]RINNELL•s
First in music since 1879
323 South Main 662. 5667 Ann Arbor
JOHN LEIDY Gl FTS
601-607 E. Liberty 668-6779
Diamonds-Watches- Gifts Imported Crystal
EDWARDS JEWELERS, INC.
Watch and Clock Repairing
215 s. Main St. David J, Pastor Ann Arbor, Michigan Jeweler Telephone 665-3787
Jacobsons
PORTRAIT
BRIDAL PHOTOGRAPHY
761-7500
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Tower Plaza, 555 E. WiIiiam, Ann Arbor
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663-3372
Ann Arbor 3666 S. State St. Ann Arbor, Mich.
ANN ARBOR CIVIC THEATRE
wishes to express special thanks to the following SUPPORTING PATRONS
BIMBO'S
FABER'S FABRICS GOODYEAR'S
HURON VALLEY NATIONAL BANK MAST SHOES METZGER'S RESTAURANT OVERBECK BOOK STORE
PURCHASE CAMERA SAM'S STORE
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