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The Webster Farmers' Club

The Webster Farmers' Club image
Parent Issue
Day
17
Month
April
Year
1891
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

The Webster Farmers' Club seems to have lost none of its old time vigor, as the gathering at Mr. Blodgett's last Saturday, was large and enthusiastic, the women entering into the discussion with nearly as much vim as the men and young, middle aged and old, all manifesting an equal interest. Music and feasting were no inconsiderable feature of the occasion. Rev. Geo. E. Lincoln read an excellent paper on "Success in Life," which called forth no discussion, but the question box was looked after, especially the question, "Should the farmer be his own mechanic ? " and finally the conclusión was drawn, that he who is "Jack of all trades is master of none." "What is the best remedy for the present financial difficulty of the farmer?" was the main question for discussion as announced at the previous meeting, one month [ago. E. A. Nordman and R. C. Reeve were announced to open the discussion, and as the former gentleman was not present, Mr. Reeve threw down the gauntlet and awakened quite an expression of opinión, so much so, that some of the most plethoric feeling farmers advanced the thought, that farmers of to-day are in no financial difficulty. In his opening remarks, Mr. Reeve claimed that more recreation and less of that incessant toil and grind on the part of the farmer, would have a tendency to help them out financially. This phase of the question seemed to frame a topic for the next monthly meeting, namely: "Should the farmer take more recreation?" The relation of the farmers to railroads, also to the political world was alluded to but seemed to awaken but little response from the well to do members of the club, who evidently seem quite satisfied with themselves and the rest of the world.