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Caucus Reform A Myth

Caucus Reform A Myth image
Parent Issue
Day
25
Month
November
Year
1898
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

Editor Argns: "Witli singnlar unaniinity people who are not suited with the labors of poli ti - cal conventions, or have fault to find with the result of elections, turn to a reform of the processes by which candidates are uamed (or the rules by whioh elections are conducted) as the only solution of the real or fancied evils of which they complain. It does not seem to occur to these would be reformers that the trouble lies, not with the machinery with which political parties are conducted, bnt with the individual members of those parties. The stream cannot rise higher than its sonrce and the nominations of political parties usually reflect the sentiment of the majority of those who particípate actively in party management. Those who do nottake an active interest in party aft'airs are iisually less competent ;o manage public business than those who do, and in all events legislation intended to take the management of political parties out of the hands of the active majority and place it in the ïands of the minority will f all short of ts mark if better govemment is the object intended. The independent 'oter holds in his hands at all times he most saltttary and the only effective cure for partizan corruption - the ballot. The Gates primary election law whieh, it is said, will be introduced nto the next session of the Michigan legislature is of this class. Designed ostensibly to purify party management lts effect wonld be to subject the will of the majority, at all times, to that of a small minority and at an enormous and unnecessary expense to the public. As a reform measure it is about on a par with the suggestion of the correspondent of a Detroit paper who proposed to round up with the pólice - those electors who nelgect to vote and take them to the polls in a patrol wagon, evidently unmindful of the fact that he who does not take interest enough in public affairs to vote without being compelled to do so by force would not make very intelligen uso of the franchise when brought to the polls by the pólice. Real election reforms must be direct ed at the and not the electiou laws. Until the indifferent voter i made to realize the responsibility which he owes to hiniself and liis fel low citizens it is idle to talk of reform ing the methods of politica! parties.