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Mo-jud-ran-son

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Parent Issue
Day
20
Month
October
Year
1899
Copyright
Public Domain
OCR Text

The way one prominent republican who refused to be quoted by name, put it, was tlns. "Both parties were putting up a great big bluff, thinking the other would back down. As neither did, they were in a fix and took a slick way to get out. It was all a bluff, I teil you. " Judson is out of politics, out of eourt and out of pocket. The position in a nutshell : Moran - "I insist what I said is true. " Allmendinger- "I second Moran's motion. " Jiidson - "I iusist Moran was in jail." Canfield - "I second Judson's motion. ' ' (Meeting adjourned. ) Said one of the attorneys for Judson when the peaoe protocol was signed: "When Moran was takeu to the jail he put a big sign in the window of the Register office : GONE TO JAIL FOR : TELLING THE TRUTH. : "I think he ought to be allowed to ïave gone free. It was his first ofense. " Moran is tongue-tied in his paper this week. While ré-asserting that what he said is trae, he has agreed not to teil that truth any more. How they love each other- Judson and Moran. Judson for sheriff and Moran for coiuity clerk. Let's all ratify the peace. TMs is the way the Detroit Journal sizes up the end of the Judson-Moran controversy. hi flaring headlines it says: "Big Fight in Washtenaw Couuty Against Pingree 's Lieutenant at au End." Judson said he wouldn't and, thus saying, consented. Canfield stated less than an hour before he signed the stipiüation ending his case against Allmendinger that he wouldn't do it. After having successfully weathered the freshmen rush last week, Jerry Knowlton was in excellent trim to serve as Kinne's plenipotentiary in the Judson-Moran rnix-up. "Oom Paul" and Joe Chamberlain ain't in it for a minute with the envoy extraordiuary of the circuit court of Washtenaw county when it comes to settling a real bad case. It may have been an oversight of the peace commission, but not a word was said about the Young Men 's postoffice club in the treaty. According to the terms of the contract several -leading politicians of Washtenaw will have to revise the vocabulary in which they have been wont torefer to the editor of the RegThoseoithemtside are curious to know what became of Moran's veracity upon which he staked all of those charges. ' _ KÜWWv , Being au authority on'contracts, Prof. Knowlton will nnderstand tliat no parole evidence will be admitted to alter its terms. LLL?■■"" - "rjüBs tam, The state oil inspector was evidently outof the more infiammable brands of It is to be expeoted that the Register will spell harmony with a big H this week. After all of the unMnd statements wlnch Mr. Moran has reiterated about Mr. Jndson with so much positiveness it must be somewhat tiresome to admit that perhaps it wasn't so. Peace Comniissioner Knowlton's cliënt didn't pay $20,000,000 for a settlement, but then McKinley knew he was getting a first-class fight, and Jerry ïsn'tjust sure what he's got. Henceforth it will not be necessary for Mr. Moran to select the other side of the street when the state oil inspector comes down the pike. It's too bad spring poetry is not in season. The sequel of the Young Men's postoffice club would make an inspiring theme. Democrats who had reserved seats for the show which wasn't pulled ofï yesterday, will demand rain cliecks and wait for the convention season. After fencing in all the good grazing, Billy Judson was in au excellent position to stipulate that the other fellows could keep on their own side of the fence. Benig a good lawyer, Prof. Joseph Chamberlaiii Knowlton doubtless arrariged the constitutional features of that settlement so that it vri.ll not be couditional on the supreme court. If it is uot too late, we take pleasure in recommendiug Peace Offlcer Kuowlton to the McMillan-Pingree steering committee of the city of Detroit. Perhaps there wasn't cloth enough to go round, but it has been observed that the plain and humble Germán editor was not mentioned in the protocol. Critical people believe this to be a serious defect in the instrument. Now that "harmony" among the republicans is assured, tlie Argns wonld suggest that at the next caucuses Paris Banfield be selected to head the Third ward delegation and O. E. Butterfield be chosen to march into the convention at the head of the Seveuth ward representativos. "Mysterious Billy" Judsou went to the Ypsilauti races yesterday. Nobody saw him taking Selby A. Moran, arm in arm, up into the grand stand.