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UMS Concert Program, September 22, 1984: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra

UMS Concert Program, September 22, 1984: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, September 22, 1984: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, September 22, 1984: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, September 22, 1984: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, September 22, 1984: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, September 22, 1984: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Chicago Symphony Orchestra image
Day
22
Month
September
Year
1984
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University Musical Society
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Season: 106th
Concert: Eighteenth
Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan

THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Sir Georg Solti, Music Director
Claudio Abuado, Principal Guest Conductor
Henuy Mazeu, Associate Conductor
RAYMOND LEPPARD Conductor
Saturday Evening, September 22, 1984, at 8:30 Hill Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan
PROGRAM
Overture to The School for Scandal, Op. 5........................... Barber
Symphony No. 1, Op. 10 .................................. Shostakovich
Allegretto, allegro non troppo Allegro Lento
Lento, allegro molto
INTERMISSION
Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 7...............................Dvorak
Allegro maestoso Poco adagio Scherzo: vivace Allegro
LondonIDecca, Deutsche Grammophon, RCA, CBS, and Philips Records.
This program is partially supported by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council, a state agency.
Eighteenth Concert of the 106th Season 106th Annual Choral Union Series
PROGRAM NOTES by Aiiuanh Parsons
Overture to The School for Scandal, Op. 5....................Samuel Barber
(1910-1981)
With the death of Samuel Barber in 1981, American music lost one of its most famous exponents of the Romantic tradition in composition. From his earliest works Barber found an individual style that favored "music as expression" as an ideal; he shunned the purely ex?perimental in musical composition, although at times he explored elements of the new music of the age. In a number of ways he was a "contemporary" composer even if he emphasized the traditional stream of musical thought in his own work. His earliest works which brought him international recognition and have remained in the repertory confirmed his musical style from the beginning of his career.
During the years Samuel Barber was a student at the Curtis Institute in Philadelphia, he spent several summers in the Italian village of Cadegliano on Lake Lugano. It was during the summer of 1931 that he composed the Overture inspired by the comedy by Richard Brinsley Sheridan, The School for Scandal. The first performance did not take place until the summer of 1933, when Barber was again in Italy, so that he was unable to attend the performance which was his first with a major orchestra. The Overture was performed by The Philadelphia Orchestra in Robin Hood Dell on August 30, 1933, with Alexander Smallens conducting.
Symphony No. 1, Op. 10 ...........................Dmitri Shostakovich
(1906-1975)
Shostakovich composed his Symphony No. 1 in 1925 during his last year as a student at the St. Petersburg Conservatory; he was nineteen. The first performance was played by the Leningrad Philharmonic on May 12, 1926, under the direction of Nikolai Malko.
When Shostakovich was ten, he entered the Glasser School of Music in St. Petersburg where he remained for two years. Then, in 1919, he was admitted to the Conservatory where his principal interest was in the piano, although he had been composing since he was ten. On graduation as a pianist in 1923, when he played the major works in the piano repertoire, he made the significant decision to pursue a career of composer rather than of pianist.
He wrote, according to D. Rabinovich (Foreign Languages Publishing House, Moscow, 1959): "After finishing the Conservatory I was confronted with the problem -should I become a pianist or a composer The latter won. If the truth be told I should have been both, but it's too late now to blame myself for making such a ruthless decision."
Continuing his studies at the Conservatory until 1925, he worked in composition with Maximilian Steinberg, a pupil of Glazunov and Rimsky-Korsakov. The First Symphony, Op. 10, was the last orchestral work of his student days.
The first movement begins with an allegretto introduction and then the tempo changes to allegro for the strong first theme. The second theme is presented by the flute in triple time. After the development of the themes, both themes return but in reverse order. The second movement is a three-part structure in which the lively, dance-like characteristics suggest the minuet or scherzo of the classical symphony. The third movement is an expressive lento in sonata form; the oboe introduces both the principal themes. A roll on the snare leads directly into the final movement. The finale opens with a slow introduction and is based on two themes. The music offers soloistic treatment of the instruments, including a passage for timpani alone.
Symphony No. 7 in D minor, Op. 70.................... Antonin Dvorak
(1841-1904)
The Seventh of Dvorak's nine symphonies, formerly known as the Second, is one of the masterpieces of this prolific composer and of late nineteenth century central European compo?sition. This Symphony was written at a time Dvorak was admiring the recently composed Symphony No. 3 by Brahms, his benefactor and friend -Dvorak had traveled from Prague to Berlin in 1884 to hear a performance of this work. Even though the Seventh displays less of the
nationalistic elements to be found in much of Dvorak's music, it is, nevertheless, one of the highest expressions of the Dvorak idiom, a musical style which rarely forgets the broad Bohemian landscape.
The first movement of the Seventh is a sonata structure with tuneful themes and a forceful development. The second movement, adagio, is one of the most deeply moving pieces Dvorak composed; here are brief moments when one is reminded of Dvorak's early devotion to Wagner. The third movement, a scherzo with contrasting trio, is close to the Bohemian furiant (a dance in time). The finale is a large-scale symphonic movement which illustrates Dvorak's remarkable skill in achieving an orchestration which is the embodiment of his musical thought.
The Seventh Symphony was begun in December, 1884, and the score was finished March 17, 1885. It bears the inscription, "Composed for the Philharmonic Society in London," and was played for the first time by this orchestra under the direction of the composer during his third visit to England, April 22, 1885, at St. James' Hall in London.
When he was offered only 3,000 marks for the Seventh Symphony by his publisher Simrock, Dvorak, realizing he was in a position which afforded him the privilege of being more demanding, wrote to the publisher a strong and protesting letter. Simrock paid 6,000 marks.
In 1884 Dvorak made the first of nine journeys to England where he conducted a performance of his Stabai Mater (1877), written after the death of his eldest daughter. Many honors came to him. In 1890 he was elected a member of the Franzjoseph Academy for Science, Literature and the Arts at Prague. In 1891 he was given an honorary doctorate by Cambridge University, and the following year he became professor of composition at the Prague Con?servatory. The year 1893 found him in New York as director of the National Conservatory. In 1901 his sixtieth birthday was widely celebrated and he became director of the Prague Conservatory.
At the concerts of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra the Seventh Symphony was played for the first time on March 10, 1894, with Theodore Thomas conducting.
About the Artists
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra was founded in 1891 by Theodore Thomas, the leading conductor in America at that time. His aim to establish a permanent orchestra with performance capabilities of the highest quality was realized at the first concerts of the Chicago Orchestra on October 16 and 17 of that year. Maestro Thomas served as Music Director for thirteen years until his death in 1905, only three weeks after the dedication of the Orchestra's permanent home. Orchestra Hall.
Maestro Thomas' successor was Frederick Stock, who began his career in the viola section of the Chicago Orchestra in 1895. Four years later he was named Assistant Conductor. His tenure lasted thirty-seven years, from 1905 until 1942, and his participation with the Chicagoans in Ann Arbor's May Festival was nearly that long -from 1905 through 1935.
The Stock years, dynamic and innovative, saw the founding of the Civic Orchestra of Chicago in 1919, the first training orchestra in the United States affiliated with a major symphony orchestra. He also organized the first subscription concerts especially for children, and a series of popular concerts. In 1916 the Chicago Symphony visited New York and made the first records by an American symphony orchestra under its regular conductor, for the Columbia Gramophone Company.
During the following decade three men led the Orchestra: Desire Defauw was music director from 1943 until 1947; Artur Rodzinski assumed the post in 1948; and Rafael Kubelik led the Orchestra for three seasons, from 1950 to 1953.
The next ten years belonged to Fritz Reiner. His recordings with the Orchestra remain performance hallmarks. It was Maestro Reiner who invited Margaret Hillis to form the Chicago Symphony Chorus. It was also during his tenure that Carlo Maria Giulini began to appear in Chicago regularly. In 1969 Maestro Giulini was named Principal Guest Conductor, a position he held until 1972.
In 1969 Sir Georg Solti assumed the position as the Orchestra's eighth artistic leader following Jean Martinon who held the position for five seasons. In 1970 Maestro Solti invited Henry Mazer, Associate Conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, to join the Chicago Symphony as Associate Conductor.
In 1971, under the Maestros Solti and Giulini, the Orchestra scored a resounding success on a six-week tour of Europe -its first international concert tour. Three subsequent European tours followed in 1974, 1978, and 1981, and one to Japan in 1977.
In 1982, the distinguished Italian conductor Claudio Abbado was named Principal Guest Conductor.
Today thirty-nine full-length concerts, taped in Orchestra Hall, arc broadcast over more than 400 stations in the United States and Canada. Additionally, a condensed series of thirteen concerts arc made available to overseas broadcasters in the United Kingdom, France, Italy, West Germany, Switzerland, Sweden, Australia, Japan, and the U.S.S.R. The Chicago Sym?phony has received more Grammy awards from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences than any other orchestra in the world.
Tonight's concert marks the Chicago Symphony's 197th appearance in Ann Arbor.
British-born Raymond Leppard has made an impact in both this country and abroad in a diverse career as orchestra and opera conductor, harpsichordist, and scholar of Baroque and Renaissance music. He has impressed conccrtgoers and critics alike with consummate skill, creativity and expressive interpretations.
Since establishing his residence in New York seven years ago. Maestro Leppard has broadened the scope of his North American appearances. He has returned to Orchestra Hall on two occasions since his debut in 1980 when he conducted Chicago Symphony premiere performances of Vaughan Williams' A Sea Symphony. His most recent appearance with the Orchestra was in April, 1983 in an all-British program which included the world premiere of Benjamin Britten's Occasional Overture, composed for the BBC in 1946.
Born in London, Raymond Leppard's interest and enthusiasm for Baroque and Renais?sance music began during his undergraduate years at Trinity College, Cambridge. Under the instruction of early music authority Boris Ord, he began to study the harpsichord. As a choral scholar he became the director of the local Philharmonic Society, laying the foundation for his conducting career.
Upon graduating he returned to London where he joined several ensembles as a keyboard player, including the New Philharmonia Orchestra, and formed the Leppard ensemble. During this period Maestro Leppard wrote several film scores, including "Laughter in the Dark" and "Lord of the Flies."
In 1958 Raymond Leppard returned to Cambridge as a lecturer. The academic situation provided him with many opportunities to continue his exploration of seventeenth and early eighteenth century music. At this same time he served as music director of the English Chamber Orchestra. By 1968, however, Leppard had taken off his academic gown to devote himself entirely to conducting.
Although he has conducted orchestras in the United States since the late 1960s, Raymond Leppard made his mark on the American music scene in 1974 when he conducted the Santa Fe Opera in his own realization of Cavalli's early seventeenth century opera L'Egisto. Maestro Leppard made his Metropolitan Opera debut during the 1978-79 season leading their first production of Britten's Billy Budd and repeating it the following season both in New York and on the company's national tour. He made his New York City Opera debut in 1983.
Recently honored with the title Commander of the British Empire, Maestro Leppard is best known in his native country as the former music director of the English Chamber Orchestra. His large output of recordings, many of them with that ensemble and featuring works from the Renaissance to the modems, has contributed to his global reputation. Among his most recent recordings are St. Matthew Passion for EMI and Gluck's Orfeo ed Euridice for Erato.
In the 1984-85 season Maestro Leppard begins his first American post as Principal Guest Conductor of the Saint Louis Symphony. In addition to appearances at some of the major American music festivals, he will appear with the New York Philharmonic, Boston Sym?phony, Baltimore Symphony, and Houston Symphony. Also highlighting his schedule on the podium arc two products of an academic sabbatical in Italy. At England's Glyndebourne Festival, he will conduct his realization of Monteverdi's L Incoronazione di Popped, and his realization of Cavalli's L'Orionc with the Scottish Opera at the Edinburgh Festival.
His current tour with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra includes performances in Spring?field, Champaign, and Decatur, Illinois, and this evening's concert, his Ann Arbor debut.
Chicago Symphony Orchestra
Sir Georg Solti, Music Director Claudio Abbado, Principal Guest Conductor Henry Mazer, Associate Conductor Margaret Hillis, Chorus Director
The Chicago Symphony Orchestra string section utilizes revolving seating, 'layers behind the first desk first two desks in the violins) change seats systematically every two weeks and are listed alphabetically in the roster below.
Violins
Victor Aitay Samuel Magad Co-Concertmasters
Francis Akos David Taylor
Assistant Omccrtmasters Klla Braker Perry C'rafton Josef Faerber Krank Fiatarone littty Lambert HI.in .Mill..n David Moll I'J14.11 Muenzer Raymond Niwa Charles I'ikler Jerry Sabransky Theodore Silavin Fred Spector OtakarSroubek
Joseph Golan l-eon Brenner William Faldner Thomas Hall Arnold Brostoff Kranklyn D'Antonio Adrian Da Prato Fox Periling Barbara Fraser Albert Igolnikov Nnrbert Mueller Joyce Noh Nancy Park Haul Phillips. Jr. Ronald Satkiewicz Jennie Wagner Kric Wicks
Violas
Milton Preves William Schoen John Bartholomew Donald Evans Samuel Feinzimer Richard Ferrin Lee lane Robert Swan Thomas Wright William York Isadore Zverow
Violoncellos
Frank Miller U'onard Chausow Philip Blum David Chickering Margaret Evans Leonore Glazer Jerry Grossman Don Moline David Sanders Robert Smith
Basses
Joseph i ,ii,i--i.ii, i. Bradley Opland Wayne Balmer Warren Benfield Roller Cline Joseph DiBello Mark Kraemer Stephen Lester
Harps
Edward Druzinsky l.ynne Turner
Flutes
Donald Peck.
I'rincipal Richard Graef.
Assistant Principal Louise Dixon Walfrid Kujala
Piccolo
Walfrid Kujala
Oboes
Ray Still.
lYincipal Michael Menoch.
Assistant I'rincipal Richard Kanter tirover Schiltz
English Horn
Grover Schiltz
Clarinets
Ixirry Combs.
frincipal John Bruce Ych.
Assistant Principal Gregory Smith
J. I .i.-.n. Hi", .i:i
E-Flat Clarinet
John Bruce Yeh
Bass Clarinet
J. Lawrie BI(Km
Bassoons
Willard Elliot.
I'rincipal John Raitt.
Assistant I'rincipal Wilbur Simpson Burl Une
Contrabassoon
Hurl Liiu'
Saxophone
Burl line
Deborah Oberschelp Performance Coordinator
Horns
Dale Clevenger.
I'rincipal Thomas Howell,
Associate I'rincipal Norman Schweikert Richard Oldberg Daniel Gingrich Gail Williams
Trumpets Adolph Herseth,
I'rincipal William Scarlett.
Assistant I'rincipal George Vosburgh Timothy Kent
Trombones
Jay Friedman.
I'rincipal James Gilbertsen.
Associate I'rincipal KrankCrisafulli Edward Kleinhammer
Bass Trombone
Edward Kleinhammer
Tuba
Arnold Jacobs
Timpani
Donald Koss
Percussion
Gordon Peters Sam Denov Albert Payson James Koss
Piano
Man1 Sauer Librarians
Marilyn Herring Walter Horban
Stage Manager William Hogan
Stage Technicians
Kocco Principe Thomas I! Kerins Robert Reynolds Richard Tucker
Extra Players
Samuel Agres. Bass Elaine Kohrman. Violin James Hansen. Violin Vicki Mayne. Violoncello Maxwell Raimi. Viola
Paul Chummers Acting General Manager
Orchestra Hall 220 South Michigan Avenue Chicago, Illinois 60604 312435-8122 Colbert Artists Management Inc. 111 West 57th Street New York New York 10019
1984-85 Concert Season
Houston Ballet.................................. Sat., Sun. Sept. 29, 30
Western Opera Theater, Rossini's La Ccnerentola.............. Sat. Oct. 6
Cleveland Orchestra Christoph von Dohnanyi......... Wed. Oct. 10
Guarneui String Quartet................................. Wed. Oct. 17
?James Galway, Flutist....................................... Sat. Oct. 20
Atlanta Symphony Robert Shaw......................... Sun. Oct. 21
Royal Winnipeg Ballet............................Sat., Sun. Oct. 27, 28
Ivo Pogorelich, Pianist.................................... Tues. Oct. 30
?Nexus...................................................... Fri. Nov. 2
The Masterplayers of Lugano............................. Sun. Nov. 4
Leipzig Gewandhaus Kurt Masur....................... Thurs. Nov. 8
?Leipzig Gewandhaus Kurt Masur.......................... Fri. Nov. 9
Viktoria Mullova, Violinist................................. Sat. Nov. 10
Kuijken Quartet (early music)............................ Tues. Nov. 13
Judith Blegen, Soprano, and
HAkan HagegArd, Baritone................................Sat. Nov. 17
Romanian National Choir........................... (aft.) Sun. Nov. 18
American Ballet Theatre II......................... (eve.) Sun. Nov. 18
Handel's Messiah I Donald Bryant............Fri.-Sun. Nov. 30, Dec. 1, 2
?Vienna Choir Boys.........................................Sun. Dec. 9
Pittsburgh Ballet, Tchaikovsky's Nutcracker........... Fri.-Sun. Dec. 14-16
Vladimir Ashkenazy, Pianist................................Tues. Jan. 15
Music: from Marlboro.....................................Wed. Jan. 23
Balletap USA............................................. Sun. Jan. 27
Prague Symphony Jim Belohlavek ..........................Sat. Feb. 2
Festival Chorus and soloists
Feld Ballet.......................................... Fri., Sat. Feb. 8, 9
Guarneri String Quartet.................................. Sun. Feb. 10
Katia & Marielle Labeque, Duo-pianists...................... Sun. Feb. 17
Royal Philharmonic: Yehudi Menuhin................... Tues. Feb. 19
New York City Opera National Company.................Tues. Mar. 5
Verdi's Rigoletto
?Kodo.....................................................Thurs. Mar. 7
I Fiamminghi................................................ Fri. Mar. 8
Paul Badura-Skoda, Pianist................................ Sun. Mar. 10
?Academy of Ancient Music:..............................Thurs. Mar. 14
National Symphony Mstislav Rostropovich............. Wed. Mar. 10
?Faculty Artists Concert................................. Sun. Mar. 24
Sherrill Milnes, Baritone.................................... Fri. Mar. 29
Polish Chamber Orchestra..............................Thurs. Apr. 18
?Concerts added since first announcement last spring.
For free brochure with complete information, cotitact the Musical Society (see below).
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Memorial Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1270 Phones: (313) 665-3717, 764-2538

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