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UMS Concert Program, April 18, 1985: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Polish Chamber Orchestra

UMS Concert Program, April 18, 1985: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Polish Chamber Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, April 18, 1985: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Polish Chamber Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, April 18, 1985: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Polish Chamber Orchestra image UMS Concert Program, April 18, 1985: International Presentations Of Music & Dance -- Polish Chamber Orchestra image
Day
18
Month
April
Year
1985
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University Musical Society
OCR Text

Season: 106th
Concert: Sixty-fourth
Rackham Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan

3ntetMtional
THE UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Polish Chamber Orchestra
JERZY MAKSYMIUK Music Director and Conductor
Jerzy Klocek, Cellist Jan Stanienda, Concertmaster
Thursday Evening, April 18, 1985, at 8:30 Rackham Auditorium, Ann Arbor, Michigan
PROGRAM
Musique Funebre (1958)...................................... Lutoslawski
Prologue Metamorphoses Apogeum Epilogue
Concerto for Cello and Orchestra in C major, H. VIIb:l...............Haydn
Modcrato Adagio
Allegro molto
Jeuzy Klocek
INTERMISSION
Intermezzo....................................................... Reger
Lyric Andante: Liebestraum
Chamber Symphony in C minor, Op. 110a................... Shostakovich
(Rudolf Barshai's arrangement of String Quartet No. 8) Largo
Allegro molto Allegretto Largo Largo
EMIAngel Records Sixty-fourth Concert of the 106th Season Twenty-second Annual Chamber Arts Scries
PROGRAM NOTES by Leonard Burkat
Musique Funebre (in memory of Bela Bartok).......... Witold Lutoslawski
(b. 1913)
Lutoslawski is one of the leading figures among Poland's older "new" composers. He was born into a family of scholars, entered the Warsaw Conservatory as a composition student at fifteen, and also studied mathematics at the University of Warsaw. Most of Lutoslawski's early work, which was traditional in character, was destroyed during the Second World War. In the late 1940s he started to write in a new style, using Polish folk material in a manner modeled after Bartok's use of Hungarian folk music. In the late 1950s he wrote a small number of works using the twelve-tone method of composition, and in the early 1960s he began to incorporate experimental procedures, along with traditional processes, in his music. Funeral Music was written between 1956 and 1958 and is a fine example of his style at the time. The following description of the work is abridged from a note by the composer:
"In dedicating my Funeral Music to the memory of Bcla Bartok, I wished to honor the tenth anniversary of the death of the great composer. I did not seek inspiration in Bartok's own music while writing this piece, and any possible resemblances to it are unintentional. If resemblances do in fact exist, they prove that the study of the works of Bartok has been fundamental for the composers of my generation."
Funeral Music is in one movement made up of four continuous sections. The Prologue, which is constructed in the form of alternating canons in several parts, is based on a twelve-tone row. The Metamorphoses begin with the slow rhythm of the Prologue, but as they unfold they reach a violent presto through the diminution of rhythmic values. The Apogee, the culminating point of the work, is based on chords comprising all the twelve tones of the scale. The twelve parts arc gradually drawn toward the middle register, where they form a unison, and it is with this that the Epilogue begins, fortissimo. This final section, in which the structure is analogous to that of the Prologue, returns to the slow rhythm of the opening. The canons appear here in their most complex form (eight parts) at first, and then are simplified by degrees to six, four, and two parts, and finally leave the last word to a solo cello.
Concerto for Cello and Orchestra in C major, H. VIIb:l.... Franz Joseph Haydn
(1732-1809)
Haydn was one of the greatest composers in the history of orchestral music but, for so productive a worker, he wrote curiously few concertos. The reason is, perhaps, that although he played the violin and piano with professional competence, he was not a virtuoso performer, as were Bach, Handel, Mozart, and Beethoven. Though Haydn had no distaste for virtuosity -evidenced from the difficulty of his symphonies, quartets, piano trios, and piano sonatas -the princely family that employed him as staff conductor and composer was quite content with the occasional concerto he composed for some particularly talented member of the house orchestra, on a special occasion or on commission.
Two of his finest concertos arc for cello, the one in D major, written in 1783, and the C-major, which was completely lost for about 200 years. Haydn listed the opening theme of this C-major Concerto in a catalog of his works that he sketched around 1765, but the music was not found until 1961, when it turned up in a private library transferred from the castle of a once noble Czech family to the National Museum in Prague. A note in the old cello part indicates that Haydn wrote the Concerto for Joseph Wcigl, a close personal friend and a member of his orchestra, for whom he also wrote difficult solo cello passages into several of his symphonies. The Concerto was given its first performance in modern times at a concert of the Prague Spring Festival in 1962.
The thin writing for the orchestral strings suggests that Haydn had very few players available at the time when he wrote the Concerto, and that the soloist may even have been his only cellist. The Modcrato is, in terms of the time, quite grandly laid out and is devoted to the intense exploitation of the theme which it opens. Next are a lyrical and almost sentimental Adagio and a finale, Allegro molto, of brcathtakingly brilliant virtuosity.
Intermezzo.................................................. Max Reger
(1873-1916)
When Brahms died in 1897, many Central Europeans thought that his successor, the banner-bearer of the next generation of German composers, was 24-year-old Max Rcger, whose work seemed to be rooted in Bach, yet to reconcile the differences between the classical tradition and the new music of Wagner. Even Schocnbcrg wrote that the greatest musicians alive then were Mahler, Strauss, and Rcger.
Rcger was an organist, pianist, teacher, conductor, and music director of the University of Leipzig and of the famous court at Meiningcn until, in 1914, he settled in Jena to devote the remainder of his life to composition. Two years later, at age forty-three, he died suddenly of a heart attack. "The second Bach," as some of his friends called him, was a man of broad tastes and admirer of both the arch-Romantic Liszt and of the classicists who were Liszt's enemies, and Reger refused to be drawn into the wars between the supporters of Wagner and Brahms. He composed this lovely, short work in 1898.
Chamber Symphony in C minor, Op. 110a............Dmitri Shostakovich
(1906-1975)
Shostakovich's family, originally Polish, settled in Russia two generations before the composer's birth, when his grandfather was released from exile in Siberia. Following his first piano lessons from his mother, the young musician studied at the Petrograd Conservatory and for his graduation piece wrote his First Symphony, a brilliant work that was soon performed everywhere in Europe and America. During his fruitful career he proved to be music's last great classicist, the composer of fifteen symphonies and fifteen string quartets with an important place in the historical line that leads from Haydn to our own time.
During the Second World War, Shostakovich lived through the terrible siege of Lenin?grad, which he memorialized in his Seventh Symphony, saying that the Russian people would never forget or forgive the Nazis' attempt to destroy Slavic culture. On July 14, I960, he finished his Eighth String Quartet and dedicated it to "the memory of the victims of fascism and War." This Chamber Symphony is Rudolf Barshai's arrangement of the Quartet.
The dedication suggests a great social and historical purpose for the piece, but it is also an intensely personal work. It is pervaded by references to the composer's motto, the notes D, E-flat, C, B, which are a sort of musical cryptogram derived from the German designations of the notes of the scale and the German spelling of his name: D. SCHostakovitch. These are the opening notes of the first, third, and fifth movements, and they are heard in the other movements as well.
Shostakovich developed his late style from elements found in his earlier works, which are better known in America. In this score we find the characteristic extended chromatic melodies that are often stretched over long sustained notes, persistent rhythmic figures that are power?fully hammered out at some times and at others are repeated gently and quietly, with great dynamic contrasts and much counterpoint of considerable complexity, even when it is in only two parts.
The work is in five connected and closely related movements. The Largo first movement is a quiet, contrapuntal prelude derived principally from the DSCH motto, and the second, Allegro molto, is assembled in a structure that resembles the classical sonata-form. After a moment's pause comes the Allegretto, a waltz-like consideration of the motto. The music of the fourth movement Largo is dark in tone, almost always in the lowest registers of the instruments, and it quotes the patriotic song Bowed by the Burden of Bondage. At its end, the motto leads into the final Largo where it is used fugally, and other musical ideas from the first movement arc also recalled.
About the Artists
Founded in 1972 by Jcrzy Maksymiuk, the Polish Chamber Orchestra is hailed for its superb ensemble and artistic excellence throughout Europe, North America, Australia, and Japan. It performs in many of Europe's major festivals, including Edinburgh, Vienna, and Lucerne. Among its recording credits is the Best Mozart Recording of 1978, awarded by the Mozart Society of Vienna for the Mozart Salzburg Divcrtimenti. Maestro Maksymiuk was formerly principal conductor of the Polish National Orchestra and with that group toured throughout Europe and performed at many of Europe's leading music festivals. He and the Polish Chamber Orchestra are currently making their sixth tour of North America and their first Ann Arbor appearance.
Jerzy Klocek studied the cello under Professor Jozef Mikulski in Krakow. From 1965 to 1979 he was principal cellist and soloist in the Polish National Radio and Television Symphony Orchestra in Krakow. He also worked with The Mastcrplayers, an international chamber orchestra based in Lugano, Switzerland. Mr. Klocek has performed in chamber groups and as soloist throughout Europe, and in 1973 he was awarded the City of Krakow Prize for his services to music.
The Orchestra wishes to thank LOT Polish Airlines for its partial subsidization of travel expenses during this tour.
Ann Arbor Summer Festival
June 29 through July 23, on the U-M campus
Marcel Marceau, Canadian Brass, Hal Holbrook, Maureen Forrester
Liona Boyd, American Repertory Theatre, Ballet of Montreal
Ian McKellen, Gidon Kremer, Orford Quartet, Margaret Whiting
Cliburn competition winners, Sunday brunch concerts, and much, much more . . .
A New Season of International Presentations, 1985-86
Public sale begins Monday, April 22
Choral Union Series
Concertgebouw Orchestra, AmsterdamBernard Haitink ... Sat. Sept. 28
Hanover Band of London.................................. Sat. Oct. 12
Nathan Milstein, Violinist................................. Thurs. Oct. 24
Munich PhilharmonicLorin Maazel....................... Tues. Oct. 29
Vienna Symphony OrchestraWolfgang Sawallisch....... Wed. Nov. 13
Jessye Norman, Soprano....................................... Wed. Jan. 8
Detroit Symphony Orchestra................................ Sun. Feb. 2
Gunther Herbig, Conductor; Heinrich Schiff, Cellist
Andre Watts, Pianist.......................................... Fri. Feb. 7
San Francisco SymphonyHerbert Blomstedt..............Tues. Mar. 11
St. Paul Chamber OrchestraPinchas Zukerman............Tues. Apr. 1
Chamber Arts Series
Guarneri String Quartet................................... Wed. Oct. 2
Fine Arts String Quartet and Donald McInnes............ Tues. Oct. 15
Cleveland Octet........................................... Sun. Nov. 3
New Philadelphia String Quartet.......................... Sun. Nov. 24
with Richard Woodhams, Oboist, and Yohevid Kaplinsky, Pianist
The Songmakers' Almanac................................... Sun. Feb. 9
Guarneri String Quartet.................................. Tues. Feb. 18
Beaux Arts Trio.......................................... Sun. Mar. 16
Bonn Wind Quintet.........................................Sun. Apr. 6
Debut & Encore Recital Series
Franc;ois-Rene Duchable, Pianist........................... Thurs. Oct. 10
Shura Cherkassky, Pianist................................. Tues. Nov. 26
Michala Petri, Recorder.................................... Thurs. Feb. 13
Ruggiero Ricci, Violinist.................................... Wed. Mar. 26
Choice Series
Kalidoskopio of Greece...................................... Sun. Oct. 6
Aterballeto..................................... Fri. & Sat. Oct. 25 & 26
Western Opera Theater, Don Giovanni....................... Sun. Oct. 27
National Folk Ballet of Yugoslavia..................... Thurs. Oct. 31
Murray Louis Dance Company and Dave Brubeck Quartet. . Wed. Feb. 5
Berlin Ballet............................... Wed. & Thurs. Mar. 12 & 13
Lewitzky Dance Company.....................Mon. & Tues. Mar. 24 & 25
Special Single Concerts
(available now to scries subscribers)
Carlos Montoya, Flamenco Guitarist........................... Sat. Nov. 9
Pittsburgh Ballet Theater, The Nutcracker............ Fri.-Sun. Dec. 13-15
Cracow Philharmonic....................................... Sat. Jan. 11
Krzysztof Penderecki, Conductor; Yo-Yo Ma, Cellist
The English ConcertTrevor Pinnock...................... Wed. Jan. 15
Philip Jones Brass Ensemble.................................Sun. Apr. 13
John Williams, Guitarist..................................... Wed. Apr. 16
UNIVERSITY MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burton Memorial Tower, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-1270 Phones: (313) 665-3717, 764-2538

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