Press enter after choosing selection
Graphic for events post

Media

Legacies Project Oral History: Dick Kimball

Tue, 12/10/2019 - 10:59am

Dick Kimball was born in 1935 in Rochester, Minnesota. He was the Minnesota high school diving champion four years in a row, and he also excelled in gymnastics, trampoline, and cheerleading. At the University of Michigan, he was the NCAA springboard champion in 1957, and in 1963 he was the Professional World Diving champion. Kimball coached the University of Michigan diving team for 43 years, and several U.S. Olympic diving teams. He has been inducted into the International Swimming Hall of Fame and the University of Michigan Athletic Hall of Honor.

Dick Kimball was interviewed by students from Skyline High School in Ann Arbor in 2018 as part of the Legacies Project.

A Smile For The Doctor

A Smile For The Doctor image
Parent Issue
Day
2
Month
May
Year
1955
Copyright
Copyright Protected

Francis, Thomas Jr., M.D.

Francis, Thomas Jr., M.D. image
Parent Issue
Day
1
Month
October
Year
1969
Copyright
Copyright Protected

March of Dimes Campaign Kick-Off Banquet at Michigan Union, January 1959

March of Dimes Campaign Kick-Off Banquet at Michigan Union, January 1959 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, January 6, 1959
Caption
At 'Dimes' Banquet: Chatting informally during last night's banquet at the Michigan Union officially launching the national March of Dimes campaign were (left to right) University President Harlan Hatcher; Dr. Jonas Salk, developer of the polio vaccine bearing his name; Dr. Thomas Francis, jr., U-M epidemiology department chairman who directed the serum evaluation; and Basil O'Connor, National Foundation head.

"Today" Show Broadcasts from University of Michigan to Launch March of Dimes Campaign, January 1959

"Today" Show Broadcasts from University of Michigan to Launch March of Dimes Campaign, January 1959 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, January 5, 1959
Caption
Show Telecast: Basil O'Connor (left, center), chairman of the National Foundation, is interviewed by Announcer Dick McCutcheon of the "Today" television program, part of which was telecast nationally from the University's Intramural Sports Building this morning. In front are (from left) Jerry Van Liew, an arthritis victim, and Pam Henry and Jeffrey Reil, national polio "poster children." The U-M Glee Club is in the background. The program helped launch the nation-wide 1959 March of Dimes campaign.

Mothers' March on Polio Volunteers Receive Salk Vaccine, January 1957

Mothers' March on Polio Volunteers Receive Salk Vaccine, January 1957 image
Published In
Ann Arbor News, January 31, 1957
Caption
'Armed' For The March: Before tonight's county-wide Mothers' March for polio funds, three team captains take a moment to receive Salk vaccinations. They are (left to right) Mrs. C. W. Carpenter (seated), Mrs. Allen Eschelbach and Mrs. William R. Stevens. Dr. George V. Fink is giving the shots in his office.

Polio in Ann Arbor

Kids showing off their vaccine marks People were so desperate to save their children from the dreaded disease of polio, that when the first vaccines were sent to Ann Arbor in 1955, they were stored at the police department in a refrigerator, locked with a chain around it. Just three weeks previously, on April 12, Dr. Thomas Francis of the U-M’s School of Public Health had made the momentous announcement that the vaccine developed by Dr. Jonas Salk, which used killed polio viruses to give immunity, was “safe, effective and potent.”

“Vaccine will end polio as a major health threat,” was the headline in the April 12, 1955 Ann Arbor News, shortly after Francis gave his report at Rackham Auditorium. The announcement was made in Ann Arbor because of the key role the University of Michigan had played in the vaccine’s development. Francis, who had earlier developed a flu vaccine, joined U-M’s Public Health Department in 1941, followed the next year by Salk, who Francis had mentored at New York University. Salk left in 1947 for a job at the University of Pittsburgh, where he developed the polio vaccine using tools he had learned from Francis.